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DANCE HALL

COUNTRY CLUB CASE

MANAGER CONVICTED

In an oral judgment which he gave in the Police Court to-day at the conclusion of the hearing of charges brought against Max Archer, manager of the Titirangi Country Club, Mr. F. K. Hunt, S.M., held that the premises were those of a dance hall and restaurant, and not those of a dwelling house.

Defendant was charged on summons on two charges of permitting liquor to be consumed in a restaurant when licensed premises had to be closed, and two charges of permitting liquor to be consumed in a dance hall, while an additional charge, brought only this morning, alleged that defendant kept liquor for other persons within a no-license area. Mr. L. P. Leary represented the defendant, who pleaded not guilty to all charges. When the case first came before the court last Friday week, Mr. Leary submitted that the premises were not those of a dance hall or restaurant, but were a dwelling house occupied by the owner, Mr. George Hunter, and his family and relatives. Counsel resumed legal argument along these lines when the hearing was continued this morning, and also called the defendant to give evidence. "Xo Xight Life" The magistrate said he was satisfied, after hearing the evidence of both sides, that the premises were those of a dance hall and a restaurant. "I'm afraid Auckland has not got a large enough population of leisured people to run a country club, but it does seem hard that a lot of young people who want to enjoy themselves in the evening have great difficulty in doing so without breaking the law," added Mr. Hunt. "There is certainly no night life in Auckland, so I'm told, but we have got to take things as we find them. In this case I am asked to find that this place is a man's private home, and that people who go there are his guests. That I am quite unable to do. It is a dance hall and a restaurant. Two absolute strangers to the manager—twp policemen, each with a lady partner, were admitted after paying 10/ for a double ticket. They brought beer with them and this was taken in by an assistant and was kept for their consumption on the premises. They were also supplied with a good meal. They were not members, and were not asked to become members."

Convicted on each of the first four charges, defendant was fined £5 and costs on two charges, and was discharged on the other two charges. The charge of keeping liquor for other persons within a no-license area was dismissed.

"In case you might want to consider an appeal, I will increase the fines," the magistrate suggested to Mr. Leary.

Mr. Learv agreed to this course, and each of the two fines was increased to £5 1/.

"It was certainly a very well run and managed place, and there was no suggestion of anything improper occurring," said Mr. , Hunt.

Mr. Leary: That is quite so, sir, and I thank you for the observation.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19410715.2.88

Bibliographic details

DANCE HALL, Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 165, 15 July 1941

Word Count
511

DANCE HALL Auckland Star, Volume LXXII, Issue 165, 15 July 1941

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