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STORM FORECAST.

"QUITE A GOOD ONE." AUCKLAND CRITICISM. METEOROLOGIST "REPLIES. (By Telegraph—Own Correspondent.) WELLINGTON, Thursday. A reply to Auckland criticism that | warning of the recent cyclonic storm , was not given by the meteorological service was made to-day by Dr.'E. Kidson, director of meteorological services. He claimed that the forecast issued last Saturday was, under the circumstances, quite a good one. "We have to issue the forecast a considerable time before the 2vent, whereas people in Auckland no doubt realised that the storm was coming when it was right upon them," Dr. . Kidson said. "Many people can be weatherwise after the event." The forecast sent to Auckland on Saturday morning was to the following effect:—'"While an anti-cyclone of slight intensity has moved on to the central and southern portions of the Dominion, a deep cyclone is moving from the north toward the northern extremity. The forecast is for strong easterly winds to gales; weather dull and misty with general rain. Heavy falls probable, with some flooding. Seas be'eoming rough to high on the east coast and moderate but rising on tne west." Reports from Norfolk.

"This," continued Dr. Kidson, "in view of the fact that we have to depend almost entirely 011 indications received from reports from Norfolk Island, I do not consider a bad forecast. At that time the centre of the storm was north of the North Island and it had been moving south very slowly. It was not until Saturday evening that the southerly movement became very rapid, while at that same time the storm deepened very considerably."

Commenting on the advocacy of the establishment of a branch of the meteorological office in Auckland, Dr. Kidson said it was the intention to establish a branch there within a few months, chiefly in connection with the meteorological services for aviation. The only advantage of having a branch in Auckland during the recent storm would have been that there might possibly liavo been issued late on Saturday evening a special warning, but that was very doubtful. When a storm was coming across tlffe ocean one could not get detailed reports about it. Sea Captain's Remarks. The storm in Auckland was described as the greatest that had ever been experienced, Dr. Kidson said. It was difficult to say that that was so; it was quite possible that it was, but there were many places that had had worse storms. At Palmerston North it seemed to have been the worst ever experienced there. Referring to remarks attributed to a sea captain to the effect that due warning could have been given, Dr. Kidson said that these people were always weatherwise after the event. Even- at .'5 p.m. on Saturday.no gales were reported in reports received by the meteorological office. Dr. Kidson added that it was no more complex a problem to forecast for Auckhyid than for anywhere else; in fact, the problem was more complex in Wellington, where the high mountain ranges were a complicating factor.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19360207.2.120.3

Bibliographic details

STORM FORECAST., Auckland Star, Volume LXVII, Issue 32, 7 February 1936

Word Count
494

STORM FORECAST. Auckland Star, Volume LXVII, Issue 32, 7 February 1936

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