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STORMSWEPT.

CITY AND SUBURBS. WIDESPREAD DAMAGE. ROOFS TORN FROM HOUSES, Auckland city and suburbs felt tlu full force of the storm, which at its height, was cyclonic in intensity. The heavy rain on Saturday was followed by boisterous conditions, and through the night the wind rose to a lull gale, which continued throughout yesterday, and did not show signs oi lessening in force until the evening. There are reports of damage in a! directions, much of a minor nature, bul in some cases both extensive and serious Full sized trees, which had stood the iorce of many a blow, were uprooted, gardens were flattened into desolation sheets of iron were torn oft* houses, is several instances small buildings were wrecked, while there was a heavy toll •f broken windows. A feature of the storm was the shifts of the wind and a remarkably long period of a very low barometric leading. On the Auckland Harbour the worst effects of the storm were felt in the early /hours of yesterday morning, when at the top' of highwater seas were breaking right across the western viaduct, and the deck of King's Wharf was awash. Similar Visitation. The cyclonic storm was similar in Intensity to one which swept the Xorth Island 011 March 18, 1918. On that occasion great damage was caused on the Auckland waterfront, houses were damaged in various suburbs and trees uptooted, and in the King Country, and in the Raetihi district in particular, disastrous bush fires followed, involving loss of life. On that occasion the barometer fell as low as 28.9. It was estimated that m Auckland yesterday the gale at its height reached a velocity of 90 miles an hour. In the early part of Saturday evening the wind was in the east quarter, and gradually shifted to nor'-east. Through *ihe night the full force of the gale continued, but at daylight there was a lull. It was only temporary. The wind then shifted to the west, and steadily grew io gale force. At mid-day yesterday many of the residents of the outer Auckland suburbs had cause to feel alarm, as houses rocked and branches Were being stripped off trees. The wind then worked round to another point of the compass and gradually died down. It was the wildest Sunday that many Aucklanders have known. The streets were practically deserted until the afternoon, but then a good many people made their way to the waterfront on the city side to view traces of the storm. All through the afternoon there

was' a confused sea in the harbour waves were breaking all along thi northern shores, but despite the Incle ment conditions the harbour service! ■fc-ere regularly maintained. Damage To Houses. The higher levels of the Mount Eos kill and Mount Albert areas got th< full force of the wind when it shiftec to the west, and in these districts there was general uprooting of trees and levelling of fences. The home of Mr. E. A. Sly, at 482 Mount Albert Road, Mount Roskill, was damaged. Half the roof was torn off sheets of flying iron cut the power and telegraph lines, and the chimney crashed, A portion of the roof was torn off at the home of Mr. M. P. Hansen, 24, Gladstone Road, Mount Albert, and iron and rafters were scattered over the street. A house being built in Nikau Road. Onehunga, was wrecked, while at the brickyards at New Lynn considerable damage was caused. In the city area damage was not so apparent, but several plate-glass windows at the Auckland Gas Company's showroom in Pitt Street were blown in, and there was also window damage in bymonds Street and Ponsonby. Even in the city parks the trail of the storm was evident. Near the Auckland Public Library one tree in Albert Park was uprooted, "while large limbs were smashed off others. It was the wildest week-end that Auckland has probably known, a delude that was followed by an intense storir which, while it lasted, came from nearly every; point of the compass. Owing to telegraphic isolation then is little news of how some of the dis .tricts in other parts of the island liav fared, but it is evident that .the rail and storm was widespread and of area Intensity.

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Bibliographic details

STORMSWEPT., Auckland Star, Volume LXVII, Issue 28, 3 February 1936

Word Count
714

STORMSWEPT. Auckland Star, Volume LXVII, Issue 28, 3 February 1936

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