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DOLE EXTENDED.

FOR BOYS AND GIRLS. CONDITIONS IN ENGLAND. it everyone SEEMS HAPPY." "Conditions in England are very much better than I expected to find; everyone seems to be happy and contented," said Mr. J. W. Beanland, a member of the Christchurch City Council and Christchurch Drainage Board, when seen on the Rangitiki this morning, on the liner's arrival from England. Mr. Beanland has been away from the Dominion for six months, and spent a month in Australia, and 10 days in Germany. In

England he attended the international bowling conference at Belfast, and the health conference at Bristol, at which he represented the Christchurch City Council. Mr. Beanland said he had particularly interested himself in the payment of the dole. The Government had recently introduced a number of alterations governing its distribution, the principal alteration being that which provides for boys and girls under 18 years being allotted sustenance. Mr. Beanland said that he would explain the whole position at the first meeting he would attend of the unemployment committee in Christchurch. "From what I gathered from reports, and saw, there is less unemployment in England to-day than some little time back. Building is very active, particularly in the North of England, and hundreds of workers' homes are going up in the small towns. The prices of these homes range from £300 to £f)00, and for rented houses the workers pay from 8/0 to 12/0 weekly."

Marketing Difficulties. "In conversation with Sir James Parr, High Commissioner for New Zealand, I realised the difficulties which confront this country in marketing and disposing of her butter and meat on the English market," said Mr. Beanland. " The British farmer is now being encouraged to increase his production, and is being assisted in various ways by the Government. He is much better off than formerly, and is now given a bonus of 5/ per head for cattle sold for slaughter. The problem of selling our produce to the extent we would like is not an easy one to solve. "As chairman of the Christchurch City Council I was naturally interested in the English roads. They are magnificent, mostly bitumen, and they make travelling comfortable and easy, and because of their first-class order, travel is cheap. The trolley buses in England are a big success, and in many places have replaced tlie trams. I saw many streets where the tram rails had been removed, the trams having given way to the buses." The health conference at Bristol occupied five days and was attended by representatives of nearly every town in England. Addresses were delivered by prominent medical men and engineers, and were mostly of a high standard. During his 10 days in Germany Mr. Beanland saw considerable unemployment and a great deal of poverty. Tourist traffic seemed to be at a standstill and at one hotel which had accommodation for 500 guests, there were only three in the diningroom during his stay. Mr. Beanland leaves by the Limited for Christchurch this evening.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19341024.2.29

Bibliographic details

DOLE EXTENDED., Auckland Star, Volume LXV, Issue 252, 24 October 1934

Word Count
498

DOLE EXTENDED. Auckland Star, Volume LXV, Issue 252, 24 October 1934

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