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OBITUARY.

MR. W. J. TAYLOR. The death occurred at Tuakau early yesterday afternoon of Mr. William James Taylor, aged 53, who had been for 13 years a member of the Tuakau Town Board. He was chairman for ten years, until last September. Born at Thames in 1880, Mr. Taylor was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Taylor. He was educated at Waiotahi School, and as a youth worked in the gold mines in the Thames district. He joined the police force after service in the South African War (he enlisted when 18 years old), his last three stations being at Wellington South, Hikuai and Tuakau. When he retired in 1920 he purchased the freehold of the Tuakau Hotel, which he still held at the time of his death. He was a past patron of the Franklin Rugby Union, atad, besides being chairman for many years of the Rugby Referees' Association, was also an active referee. Other activities were membership of the executive of the Franklin Racing Club and patron of the Tuakau District Sheep Dog Trials Club. He is eurvived by Mrs. Taylor and two sons, Messrs. Leslie and WiUi am Taylor. MR. DAVID DOULL. An old resident of Auckland, Mr. David Doull, died on April 9, aged 83 years. He was born in Dumbarton, Scotland, and arrived at Auckland by the ship British Trident in 1864. He joined the staff of the "Southern Cross" newspaper, and remembered the occasion when men of war sailors, put a rope round a newspaper office in Auckland and threatened to pull it down unless the proprietors of the paper apologised for some strictures regarding the officers of the ship. As the apology was made, the men unhooked the rope and left the building intact. Mr. Doull was a member of the old Naval Brigade under Captain Le Roy, and also belonged to the drum and fife band of that corps. At one time he was superintendent of St. David's Presbyterian Sunday school. He married a daughter of Corporal Gladding, and the guests were conveyed to the wedding in the first bus run by Mr. W. Patterson to Kingsland. Mrs. Doull died in 1909. The following children are left: Mr. D. W. Doull, of Waiuku, Mr. James F. Doull, West End, and Mrs. A. F. Gladding, Narrow Neck.

MRS. ELLEN CALLAGHAN. After a residence of 63 years in New Zealand, Mrs. Ellen Callaghan died on April 9 at her home, Hamilton. She was born in Liverpool 86 years ago, and after her arrival in Auckland, lived at Ohaupo, where she was married to Mr. John Callaghan, 56 years ago. For the last 35 years Mrs. Callaghan lived at Hamilton. Her husband died 16 years ago. One son was killed in the war. The remaining children are Mr. J. L. Callaghan, of Rlokio, and Miss Margaret Callaghan, of Hamilton. MRS. ISABELLA BAILDON. An old resident of Auckland, Mrs. Isabella Baildon, died on April 10 at the house in which she had lived for 53 years. She was born at Paisley, Scotland, 86 years ago, being a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Gow. The family arrived at Auckland by the ship Ganges in 1863. Shortly after arrival Miss Gow was married to the late Mr. William Baildon, a well-known builder, and they went to Thames when that goldfield was opened in 1867. Mr. and Mrs. Baildon returned to Auckland in 1876. The husband died 15 years ago. She is survived by the following children:—Messrs. George Baildon (formerly Mayor of Grey Lynn and later for several years Mayor of Auckland), John, Joseph and Frederick (of this city), Harold (Hamilton). Cameron (Foxton), Mesdames John Farrell (Devonport), and L. Benson (Waihi). One son, William, was killed in France during the war.

SISTER MARY ALEXIS. Sister Mary Alexis Collins died on April 10, at St. Mary's Convent, Ponsonby. She was born in Capetown 70 years ago, and came to Auckland with her parents, who settled at Waiuku, and later went to Thames. From that town Sister Mary Alexis was sent to St. Mary's boarding school, and was afterwards for 54 years a Sister of Mercy. She was a woman of wide culture, and much beloved by her pupils and their parents. Requiem Mass was celebrated in the Convent Chapel. MR. CHARLES MONRO. \ A ..very old resident of New Zealand, Mr. Charles John Monro, died at Palmerston North, aged 92 years. He was born at Waimea West, Nelson, being a son of the late Sir David Monro, Speaker of the House of Representatives from 1861 to 1871. Mr. C. J. Monro was educated at Nelson College and in England. He was one of those responsible for the introduction into New Zealand of Rugby football. Prior to Mr. Monro's return, New Zealanders had been playing a form of football known as the Australian code. In 1870 Mr. Monro persuaded those so engaged to change to Rugby, thus playing a large part toward organising the new code. He also took part in the first interprovincial Rugby match Between Nelson and Wellington, played on Petone Paddock, near the site where the railway station now stands. On going to the Manawatu district in 1887 Mr. Monro still was associated with eports, and was first president of Manawatu Golf Club. Mr. Monro's three sons are medical men: Major D. C. Monro, R.A.M.C., England; Dr. J. S. Monro, Palmerston North; and Dr. H. Monro, Ramsgate, England; There are two daughters. Mrs. H. M. Gaisford and Miss L. Monro, of Palmerston North. Mrs. Monro survives her husband.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19330412.2.141

Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Auckland Star, Volume LXIV, Issue 86, 12 April 1933

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926

OBITUARY. Auckland Star, Volume LXIV, Issue 86, 12 April 1933

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