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STAGE JOTTINGS.

"The Miracle/' greatest of all miracle plays, has recently enchanted. Glasgow. Lady Diana Manners' Madonna is a portrayal which will live long int he hearts of everyone who saw the famous 6 P e < : " tacle drama, which the "Glasgow Weekly Herald" declares to be unreservedly the finest stage play ever present®! in the city.

Frank Neil, the producer, is greatly impressed with Auckland s modern film theatres. It is 14 years since he was last here as a lead in the stock drama which was once popular at the Kings Theatre, now the Prince Edward picture house. Mr. Brandon Cremer, manager of tho old King's, it will interest many New Zealand friends to learn, is now a responsible executive at the Els tree film studios in London. When in England 12 months ago Mr. _ Neil was delighted, to meet Mr. Cremer, wnj retains happy memories of his experience hero in matters theatrical.

Stockport has now one of the most beautiful theatres in England. The new Garrick, opened on December 19, with a seating capacity of 1600, has one o: tho best stages built in recent years. With a proscenium opening of 41ft, the stage has a depth of 43ft. There are 30 dressing rooms and eight boxes in tl-e theatre itself. The house was given a particularly brilliant opening vehicle in "Firebird," which was played by Gladys Cooper and her company. Incidentally, it is rumoured that Miss Cooper will produce a new play early in 1933, wit'a Ivor Novello in the male lead.

A play which proved most successful in London was introduced to Melbourne theatregoers on Boxing Day, and is now in the middle of its season. This is "Treasure Island," a serious dramatic interpretation of the famous R. L. S. adventure story. At least three famous artists appear in the roles in which they were seen in the Old Country. Vernon Fortescue (Long John Silver), Beckett Bould in a dual hole Bones and Ben Gunn), and Harold Reese (Jim Hawkins) are the players concerned. The play is being produced by Vernon Fortescue. Several well-known Australians appear ill the minor parts, and include Tal Ordell, George Blunt, John D'Arcy, Raymond Longford and Les King. The production is in four acts of ten scenes.

An 18-year-old Auckland dancer, Miss Leslie Crane, is reported to be doing very ■well across the Tasman, playing with the Madge Elliott-Cyril Richard company in "Hold My Ha-nd" and "Blue Roses" in Sydney and Brisbane. She was first given an audition some months ago while the company was playing in "Blue Roses" in Auckland, and as a result went to Sydney, where she was cast as one of the four show-girls in "Hold My Hand," the latest musical comedy produced by the company. She then went with them to Brisbane, where she played in "Blue Roses." In a revival of the same play she was once more seen in Sydney shortly afterwards. While there, she was given an audition by Dame Sybil Thorndike, who spoke very well of her voice. Miss Crane received her dancing training in Auckland. By reason of her height and looks, she has won a place in Sydney a fashion model for several city business houses.

On Monday evening Wellington will be given its final opportunity to see Dame Sybil Thorndike during her present tour. She opens a two-night season 111 "Madame Plays Nap," after liaving given, from Christmas Night, performances in "Saint Joan" (six nights), "Captain Brassbound's Conversion" (3), "Macbeth" (2), and "The Medea of Euripides" (2). The great actress will open in Christcliurch on January 11, playing there till January 23. She will next be seen in Dunedin. (January 24 to February 2), Oamaru (February 3), Timaru (February 4 and 6), Mastcrton (February S), Hastings (February 0), Palinerston North (February 10 and 11), Wanganui (February 13), Hawera (February 14), New Plymouth (February 15 and 10), and then Auckland (February 18 to March 4, 13 nights). It appears that the powerful play by Henrik Isben, "Ghosts," in which the star gained perhaps her most impressive triumph in Melbourne, will not be seen locally. Dame Sybil is accompanied by her husband, Mr. Lewis Casson (who plialvs Macbeth in the Shakespearean tragedy), and her son, Mr. Christopher Casson.

A charming English musical comedy artiet, Shirley Dale, lias comc to Australia from London to appear in the role of Resi in "Waltzes From Vienna," which opened in Melbourne on Christinas Eve. The appearance of this artist in Australia and New Zealand will be given additional interest by the fact that she has already been seen and heard in the British "talkie" production of "The Beggar Student," with Lance Fairfax, the New Zealander. Shirley Dale has had varied experience 011 the stage. She played Melisande in Debussy's "Pelles and* Melieande"; understudied and deputised for Dorothy Silk at the Court Theatre; played Jenny Diver in "The Beggar's Opera" at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith; played in "La Vie Parisienne"; was the Singing Woman in "The Liar" at the Embassy Theatre: appeared as Imogen in "Tantivy Towers," by A. P. Herbert, of "Punch," at the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith; Betty in "The Old Bachelor"; and made her film debut in "The Beggar Student." One of her most recent stage successes was in the much-discussed "Helen." in which George Robey appeared. Her roll was Minefva.

CAUGHT. "Folks," said the coloured minister, "the subject of my sermon dis evenin am 'Liars.' How many in de congregation has done read the 69th chapter of Matthew?" Nearly every hand. in the audience was raised immediately. "Dat's right," said his reverence. Y is just de folks I want to preach to. Dere is no C9th chapter ob Matthew. CROWD WITH A KICK. Political Speaker: I'm pleased to see such a dense crowd here to-night. . Voice: Don't be too pleased. We am t all dense. the nurse had some. Doctor: The tablets I sent you were to produce sleep. Did they have that effect. Patient: Yes, indeed! The nurse never wakened once during the night. EASY. Jake: What is ijhat you part your hair with, ride all over the town in, and feed the baby with? Legge: I can't imagine. Jake: A comb, an automobile, and a bottle. A RESPONSIBLE POST. Employer: What was the nature of your last employment? Applicant: I had 200 people under me. Employer: Well, what was your work? Applicant: Cutting the grass in the cemetery. ALL FIXED. Visitor (watching a hotly-disputed football match in a Yorkshire village): It looks as if the referee is going to get into hot water after this match. Excited Yokel: No, he bain't, ba-goom; he is going in the pond; it be a' fixed oop. CERTAINLY DID. In a big store an old woman badgered the assistant for an hour without making a purchase. "After all," said | the woman, after the stock of fabrics had been exhausted, '"I think I want | muslin."

"You certainly do," was the reply.

A QUICK PATCH.

Caller (to child whose mother has left the room for a moment): Come here to me, my dear. Terrible Child: No, I mustn't do that. Mamma told me I must stay sitting in the chair, because there's a hole in the cushion. VERY HOT. She was very proud of her son's prowess. "He must be a very fast runner," she said, showing a paper to a friend. "It says here that he fairly burned up the track under his record-breaking epeed, and it's true because I saw it th'is morning, and the track was nothing but cinders." HP A TREE. Two coloured men were discussing family relations. "Yes," said Ambrose, "I can trace my relatives back to a family tree." "Chase 'em back to a family tree?" said Mose. "No—trace 'em, trace 'em.* "Well, there ain't but two kinds of things dat live in trees—birds and monkeys—an' you ain't got no feathers on you." ANYTHING TO OBLIGE. She was very stout. A long course of slimming lessons had failed to give her that schoolgirl figure. One day she went into a second-hand clothes shop. "Do you let out costumes?" she asked the assistant. The young lady eyed her somewhat curiously, and replied: "Well, Ave don't as a rule, madam, but I'm afraid we should have to do so in your case." BEAUTY UNADORNED. Boggles: There was a whale of rumpus at the charity fancy dress ball last wee'k, I hear. Goggles: What happened to cause that ? Why, Blathers (who is a bit nearsighted) asked Miss Faceache when sh3 was jroing to remove her mask. Well, that's nothing to squabble about. Yes, but you see, the trouble was the lady was not wearing one. GETTING WINDY. Patient in hospital, just coming round from under anaesthetic after operation, and looking at patient in next bed: "What's been the operation, mate ?" "Why, the removal of two swabs the doctor left in at the last operation." "Oh, who was the doctor?" "Why, Dr. Brown, of course." "Well, that's the one that's operated on me." Voice from next bed: "He left a pair of scissors inside me." Dr. Brown (in corridor): "Has anybody seen my top hat?"

Lady (to butcher): I'll take a pound AI of these sausages. Are they British? '.Ml Butcher: Yes, ma'am, the bulldog breed. . f Hubby: You didn't have a rag on Sf your back when I married you. Wife: Anyway, I've plenty of rags now. ImL "So Dora took a rich old invalid for ; || | better or worse?" "No, she took him for worse, but he }$> * got better." Mother to Tommy: If you don't bo 8 ! good, I'll call a policeman. ° Tommy: And if you do, I'll tell him f we've got no wireless license. Husband: You know, dear, I'm not perfect. Wife: Oh, yes, I know it, but I was j§£ not aware that you did. ' "'lt First Diner: May I trouble you, sir, 1 for the sugar baein from your table? Second Diner: Do you mistake me for |||f| a waiter? "No; I mistook you for a gentleman." Woman (to friend): I have got a 'sip splendid husband. He halves everything with me. He came home the other night with two black eyes, and he had to give me one. ' Mother: What is the trouble between , you and Charles? Young Wife: I—l always heard « Charles was fond of the turf, but I simply can't make him touch the lawnmower !

Auntie had arrived to stay, and Mary,.f with pride, was showing a jumper she had knitted. f "And did my little niece make this *11 by herself?" "Xearly, auntie —all hut the hole you put your head through, and that was there before I started." He entered the bird and reptile shop, saying: "I want ten thousand insects of every description—three thousand mice, and a couple of crates of cockroaches, and—" "Good gracious, man, what do you want such things for?" "Well, nj landlard gave me notice to quit, and I've to leave the house as I found it." "Good morning, Martha—always knitting. Do you find the stockings wear ■ longer if knitted by hand?" "Wear longer? Yes, of course, mum. You wouldn't believe it, but this pair of my husband's socks I knitted five years ago, and I've knitted new legs to 'em twice, and new footed 'em five times! Seems to me they'll never wear out!"

One afternoon a somewhat vain organist had been "showing off." As he was leaving the church he remarked to the blower, hoping to secure a compliment: "Well, Jock, I hope you have not been too bored by my playing to-day?" "It's all right, sir," was the reply. "I gets lots of people come and make queer noises on my organ. Some of 'em are worse than you." The master "builder spotted a man standing smoking on tho ground, and went up to him in a rage, saying: "You are no good to me, here's your wages and get off the ground." The man looked at him and held out his hand. Then he took the notes and walked quickly away. As he was passing out of sight the master called the foreman and', pointing to the man, said: "I've just paid that chap off. He's not to be engaged here again." Foreman: He never was working here; lie's not one of our men; he called to look for a job.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19330107.2.137.19

Bibliographic details

STAGE JOTTINGS., Auckland Star, Volume LXIV, Issue 5, 7 January 1933, Supplement

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2,055

STAGE JOTTINGS. Auckland Star, Volume LXIV, Issue 5, 7 January 1933, Supplement

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