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OBITUARY.

MR. CHARLES WILSON. FORMER PARLIAMENTARY LIBRARIAN. (By Telegraph.—Press Association.) WELLINGTON", this day. The death took placc late last night, at a Bowen Street private hospital, of Mr. Charles Wilson, formerly chief librarian of the General Assembly library, aged. 75 years. Deceased was elected to represent Wellington Suburbs in the Parliament of 1898, but did not seek re-election, being appointed to the position of librarian, which he held for over 25 years, until his retirement in 1920.

Mr. Wilson was born at Harrowgate and educated in the local college. Afterwards lie was engaged in the woollen trade in Bradford, and then in mercantile pursuit's at Paris. He arrived at Port Chalmers, in 1880, and was for one year assistant master at Te Aro school, then for four years on the staff of the Wanganui Collegiate School. He was next subeditor of the Wanganui "Chronicle," afterwards editor of the Gisborne "Standard" and of the "Evening News," Napier. Mr. Wilson founded the Marton "Mercury," and was editor of the "New Zealand Mail" for nine years. Mr. Wilson was one of the best-known book lovers in New Zealand, and as ail essayist 011 literary subjects had a large and appreciative following. His natural taste for reading, and his long term of office as Parliamentarian librarian, enabled him to deal with many subjects. He had a gift for writing about books in a very pleasant, gossipy style. Mr. Wilson was a bibliophile, and his collection of Dickens early editions was one of the best m Australasia. He contributed reviews of books, also literary articles, to the "Dominion" ( for many years, and articles from his pen also appeared in the "Auckland Star." Mr. Wilson published a collection of essays, "Rambles in Bookland" "New Rambles," also "City of Wellington." MR. W. WAKEFORD COX. The New Zealand friends of Mr. W. Wakeford Cox, of Shanghai, will regret to hear that cable advice has been received by the head office of the South British Insurance Company of his death from heart trouble. He was taken ill 011 February 5, when he went into hospital, and died suddenly on February 8.

Mr. Cox liad catered upon his fiftieth year of service with the company, having joined the Auckland branch in •August, 1882. He was transferred to Wellington in IS9O, and to Shanghai in 1594. He was appointed manager of the Shanghai branch in 1899, and held that position at the time of his death, iii liis sixty-fourth year. He was the elder son of the late Mr. William Cox and of Mrs. Mary E. Cox, of Norman' 3 Hill Road, Oneliunga. He married Miss A. Dryden, of Wellington, who, with two married daughters and one son, survive him. Mr. Cox last visited Auckland in 1930. MR. ALEXANDER COPLAND. (By Telegraph.—Press Association.) TIMARU, this day. The death has occurred of Mr. Alexander Copland, father of Professor D. B. Copland, Dean of the faculty of Commerce of Melbourne University. Mr. Copland, who was 92, was born in Aberdeenshire, and arrived in New Zealand by the Tudor in 1865.

MRS. WILLIAM CHRISTIE. A resident of Whangarei, Mrs. "William Christie, died in the local hospital on February 8. She was born in Scotland 80 years ago, and came to New Zealand with her parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. John Wright, in the ship Helenslea. The family settled at Pokeno, and in 1874 Miss Wright was married to Mr. William Christie, whose death occurred in 1918. Mr. Christie was for some years engaged in' carrying passengers and goods between Auckland and Mercer. In 1879 they moved to Tangoj wahine, and then to Mangakaliia, where I Mr. Christie was bush contracting. In i ISB4 they took up a farm at Hikurangi. Then Mr. Christie started carrying passengers to and from Whangarei until the railway was opened. MR. HENRY WEBB. A well-known resident of Whangarei, Mr. Henry Webb, died in the hospital there at the age of 58 years. His father and mother were pioneers of the district. Mr. Webb was born on the trip out from England. His father, Mr. William Webb, farmed at Pakuranga, Panmure, Ohaupo and Waihou before settling at Maromaku. Mr. Henry Webb was well known in the old coaching days, being a partner in the firm of Webb and Pearson, of Whangarei. He was also at one time contracting for the Railway and Public Works Departments. Mr. Webb purchased a farm at Maungakaramea some years ago, where he had since lived. He is survived by Mrs. Webb, six sons and two daughters. MR. WILLIAM OSBORNE. (By Telegraph.—Own Correspondent.) WHANGAREI, Tuesday. The death occurred last evening at his home, Rust Lane, of Mr. William Osborne, decorator and signwriter. He was born in Glasgow 45 years ago, and served in the Great War with the 10th Scottish Rifles. His health was injured by gas poisoning and shell shock, from which he never completely recovered. Mr. Osborne arrived in ' Auckland seven years ago, and two years latex he accepted an engagement with Mr. R. H. Allan, of Whangarei, and afterwards started business on his own behalf. An enthusiastic bowler, he was a member of the Whangarei Club. He was also a member of Court Victory, 9380, Whangarei. He is survived by his wife and one son, who is living in Durban, South Africa.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19320210.2.21

Bibliographic details

Auckland Star, Auckland Star, Volume LXIII, Issue 34, 10 February 1932

Word Count
880

OBITUARY. Auckland Star, Volume LXIII, Issue 34, 10 February 1932

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