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NEWS OF THE DAY.

New Zealanders Too Complacent?

Several remarks by Professor D. B. Copland in Lis address last night amounted to a warning to New Zealanders against complacency. lie remarked that it was difficult to find anyone in New Zealand who knew what the Dominions economic position was, whereas in Australia, the latest "fix" in Avhich Mr. Lang found himself Avas avcll known and understood. It was difiicult in New Zealand even tor him (a New Zealandcr) to learn the facts. Later he remarked: "One difference between Australia and New Zealand is that in Australia we know how much our deficit is."' Grass Fires. A largo grass fire broke out on the KerrTaylor estate, Mount Albert, last evening, and burnt over an area of about 35 acres. No damage to propertv was caused. The Mount Albert Brigade, owing to the distance of the fire from water mains, had no Avater to quench the flames. Two grass fires occurred at Mount Eden, one near the Mount Fxlen Kiosk, and the other in Prospect Terrace. There have been several fires of this nature on the mountain within the last six weeks, but none has been serious. Camp at Narrow Neck. About 130 trainees of the North Auckland Regiment, drawn from Auckland city and the north, Avent Avith the Ist Battalion into bivouac at Narrow Neck last night. Specialised training will be conducted for Viekere and Lewis-gun men and signallers, the unit having no general sections. An interesting programme of entertainments has been arranged. A concert will be given to-mor-row night and a dance on Thursday. Sports will take place on Friday afternoon, and the camp will end on Saturday. Lieutenant-Colonel C. S. White, T.D., is in command, with Major A. D. Jack, M.C., as his second in command, and Captain 0. Dittmcr, M.C., N.Z.S.C, adjutant. Municipal Ills. "There is no doubt that many millions of pounds of our local body debt still outstanding is in respect of works Avhich no longer exist, or arc redundant or obsolete," said Mr. J. W. Mawson. Director of Town Planning, in an address in Christchurch. lie added that a large part of the municipal ills from whic!t the people Avere suffering to-day lay in the fact that they had pursued in the past a haphazard and hand-to-mouth policy in the design, construction and improvement of their streets and public services, without any precise knowledge or certainty of the load which they would be called upon to carry during the period of the loans. The Road to Warkworth. At Warkworth on Saturday several old residents expressed approval to members of the Hospital Board, avlio were A'isiting the district, at the wonderful improvement in the roads. They said they could come to Auckland now after they had had their breakfast, do their business before lunch, then go to a good picture show and be home in time to have their evening meal. They did not mind the bad hairpin bends on the Waiwcra Hill, because, while they supposed there was nothing very much Avorsc on any main highway in New Zealand, it was a reminder of some of the hardships they had to go through in those early days when to get stuck in a deep hole with a horse-drawn or bullock-dray load led to manoeuvring which no modern driver ever had to go through. If the old hill could only speak, what tales it could tell, but some of the language Avould be too bad for publication. Naming Alpine Peaks. Three peaks in the Godley-Rangitata watershed, Southern Alps, have just been named by a party of Christchurch climbers which spent three weeks exploring in the neighbourhood. The party scaled five peaks that had never previously been ascended. The climbers worked from a base camp on Separation Creek, near the terminal face of the Godley Glacier. A fine rock peak, 7750 ft high, dominating the head of Godley Glacier, Avas named "The Commander." Another commanding summit, between Mount D'Archiac and Mount Forbes, Avas named "Mount Coatcs," after the Right Hon. J. G. Coates. An unnamed peak, 7800 ft high, on the main divide between Jacqueline Pass and Mount Victoire, was christened "The White Pyramid," on account of its remarkably symmetrical icecap, pyramidal in form. The names suggested by the party have been approved by the Geographic Board. Horticultural Training. When a remit asking the Government to establish a School of Horticulture came before the New Zealand Horticultural Trades' Association conference in Christchurch, Mr. A. Shrubshall (Christchurch) said that he thought "scheme" should be substituted for "school" in the phrasing of tho motion. The time Avas not ripe to ask the Government to form such a school, as there would not be sufficient support to make it a success. Horticulture embraced so many subjects, said Sir. Shrubshall, that some form of instruction should be available. He thought that if the Government introduced a scheme of training it would fill the present need. When New Zealand's population was large enough to warrant a school being established, then would be the time to bring the matter up. Mr. B. P. Mansfield (Napier) said that lie had carried out instruction in horticulture in his home town and at Hastings. The earthquake of last year had disrupted his classes, but those Avho received training from him showed great keenness. The remit was passed. Avith the substitution of "scheme" for "school." "That Reminds Me." Heading of Allcott's remarkable bowling feat of eight Avickets for 14 runs (including the double hat trick) at North Shore on Saturday, a local cricket enthusiast Avas overheard to remark that it reminded him of the days of "Kay" Olliff. About tAvcnty years ago, he declared, Olliff Avas the "Freeman" of Auckland cricket, a little man with a big break, who did amazing things with the ball on a sticky Avicket, to the utter confusion of even the most experienced batsmen of the day. Challenged to quote facts and figures, the oracle could not remember any speeilic devastating feat by Olliff in local club games, but ho recalled that at the Auckland Domain 19 years ago Olliff skittled the first six batsmen of 'Wellington's interprovincial side for three runs. Wellington made a recovery, getting 120 for the innings, and Olliff's average for the innings was seven for 42. His seventh victim was one Clarrie Grimmett. Yes, the same Grimmett who now bowls for Australia in Test matches. That Avas his first appearance in representative cricket in Auckland, and he got one AA'ickct for 53, but he Avas second top-scorer Avith the bat, getting 25 and 28 in the match. "Kay" Olliff is now a glad memory, but Grimmett is one of the world's best spin bowlers. Blue Herons. "Natural History Student" Avrites.- "Arc blue herons more common in the harbour than they used to be? One pair used to nest under the Queen's wharf, so waterfront gossip had it, another pair frequents Northcote wharf and environs, while some people have said that the birds are to be seen in Judge's Bay. These places are in the comparatively busy parts of the waterfront, so that the birds cannot fear man and his Ways to any extent. With their long bills and their long legs they 'make excellent fishermen, so that it is not surprising to find them on the mudflats at the head of Great Shoal Bay, in the upper harbour, where it is shallow when the tide is low. They also haunt the little islands off Rangitoto, near the lighthouse. Deserted and lonely as they are, those little islands, tussocktufted and sandy, Avould make ideal nestingplaces. Blue herons are not tlie only birds which make the coast of Rangitoto their home. Shags, terns and black-backed gulls fill the sunlit air with noise. Sea birds are always to be seen on sunny days, basking on sandy bars and low-lying islands in the gulf. On one small shoal near Rangitoto on Sunday there must have been over 200 gulls, screaming, fighting, or merely enjoying the sunshine like those watching them."

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Bibliographic details

NEWS OF THE DAY., Auckland Star, Volume LXIII, Issue 27, 2 February 1932

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1,339

NEWS OF THE DAY. Auckland Star, Volume LXIII, Issue 27, 2 February 1932

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