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NEWS FROM ALL QUARTERS.

WAR VETERAN OF 104. Detlef Marxen, of Satrup, Schleswig, who was claimed to be the last living soldier of the Schleswig-Holstein army which fought against Denmark in 1848, died recently. He was 104 years of age. UNEXPECTED HOME-COMING. Finding a man unconscious as the result of a motor car accident, a policeman took him to the Essex County Hospital at Colchester, and the injured man was admitted as "name and address unknown." When attended by the doctor on duty, lie was recognised as the hospital's 'house physician, Dr. J. A. Smith. VALUABLE PICTURES FOUND. The police discovered at the shop of an art dealer in the West End of Berlin 250 valuable engravings by Rubens, Durer, and Lucas van Leyden, which were stolen two years ago from the National Library at Madrid. Among them were 57 etchings by Rubens. The art dealer only paid £2000 for them. The police are now trying to find the persons responsible for the theft. A RECORD SENTENCE. A record in the cumulative sentences customary in Jugoslavia was passed at the Negotini Assizes on the international brigand, Captain Barbulovitch. He was sentenced to death by hanging and to 138 years' imprisonment. Barbulovitch terrorised the wilder areas of Jugoslavia, Bulgaria and Rumania for four years. His

■band of .brigands is till active under his successor, Babevitch. MACHINE-GUN MARVEL. What is claimed to be the deadliest machine-gun in the world, capable of firing .5 calibre bullets nine miles at the rate of 800 shots a minute, was recently perfected in 2s'ew York by Mr. Robert Hudson and adopted by the United States Navy. Navy officials are also interested in two other pieces of ordnance; One of these Mr. Hudson declares will shoot l.lin explosive bullets thirteen miles at the rate of 800 a minute. The other is an anti-aircraft gun, which fires .3 calibre bullets at the rate of 1400 a minute. TWICE SENTENCED TO DEATH. The execution took place recently i. Belfast of Samuel Cushnan, 26, son of a farmer, for the murder of James McCann, a postman, whom he shot and robbed.' As a consequence of the judge's mistake Cushnan had had sentence of death passed upon him twice. On the first occasion t'he Lord Chief Justice of Ulster ordered him to be hanged on "April 8, 1929." Cushnan had been removed to the cells when an official made the discovery of the mistake of a year in the date. Cushnan was then brought back to the dock and ivas again sentenced to he hanged—this time on "April 8, 1930." BOMBS IN GETHSEMANE. Unfounded rumours were lately circulated to the effect that a bomb or 'bombs in an unfinished state had been found in a garden, near Gethsemane. The facts are that on April 1 seven shells intended for the use of Turkish 70-millimetre guns during the war were discovered and reported to .the police. The police carried out an examination and found the shells in a very had condition. The shells were

removed and destroyed in the usual way. The incident was identical with frequent incidents of the discovery of Turkish ammunition throughout the country during the ploughing season. £100,000 PLAY RIGHTS. The huge royalties paid to successful playwrights were revealed by Mr. Lee Shubert, the New York theatrical producer, who opposes any change in the Copyright Law which would permit authors to dispose separately of their book, play, motion picture, and radio rights. Authors' receipts from successful productions, Mr. Shubert told the Senate Committee, range from £20,000 to £100,000. Mr. P. C. Sherriff, author of "Journey's End," had already received £26,000, and Mi6S Mary Roberts Rhinehart got £60,000 for "The Bat." The record sum of £100,000 was paid to the authors of "The Desert Song." PYTHON'S EGGS AT THE ZOO. Great was the surprise of the keeper of reptiles at the London Zoological Gardens, when, on inspecting his charges, he found that one of the large reticulated pythons—a 16ft long specimen —had laid a number of eggs, each about sin in circumference. As is invariably the case with these, snakes, the mother protects her eggs, sometimes as many as 100 in number, by coiling herself around them and supplying them with the necessary heat ; for incubation, the temperature of the parent's body during this period rising some 15deg above the normal. Although pythons lay eggs, the other giant constricting snakes—the boas and anacondas—all bring forth their young alive. RARE BOOKS ON BIRDS. A set of Gould's famous books on birds was the outstanding feature of the late Lord Blythswood's library, which was

sold at Sotheby's recently, the nine works producing £376. Comprising 37 ■huge folio volumes, they represent over 50 years' work by Gould, whose attention to detail in the 2500 coloured lithographic plates makes them of permanent value to the ornithologist. The highest price paid at the sale was £135 for "The Birds of Australia," a work which represents 21 years' labour, and contains nearly 700 plates showing over 1000 birds —many now extinct. Lord Blythswood also owned a Hecond edition of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," which, realised £100. LIGHTNING'S TRICKS. A remarkable freak of lightning is reported from Tarbes, in the Hautes Pyrenees, at a farm occupied by M. Jean Duffau. A flash of lightning melted the principal arch of the building in which he housed his cows and horses. It also cut the chains by which three cows were fastened in their stall, without, however, doing the least harm to the animals. The same flash cut three legs from a chair on which the farmer's son was sitting, without hurting the man. Then, passing through the wall, it gave the farmer and his wife a severe fright. They were sleeping in a bed which faced from east to west. After the flash their bed faced north to south, but they had suffered no injury whatever. The lightning played a similarly harmless prank at the house of M. Betheze, a farmer in the same neighbourhood. The family were sitting round the house when the flash occurred. Two of the farmer's sons had their chairs flung from under them, but nothing more serious happened.

"MARRIED" TO DEAD GIRL. A young man living in a small village near Cleve, Germany, was recently "married" to a dead girl. By a mistake, the officials of the registry office entered the particulars of the 'banns of marriage on the docuineu'ts of the bride's sister who died a year ago. Legal proceedings will have to be taken to rectify the error. QUIETEST PLACE TO LIVE. During an application for a new license at Leicester Mr. Hinde, opposing, asked ilr. Keay, architect for the applicants, whether he did not think people objected living next to a public house. Mr. Keay: I can conceive of people not wanting to live next to a public house. For the same reason I would not live next to a church or chapel. The only safe place for quiet is to live next door to a cemetery. (Laughter.) DIVORCE AFTER HALF A CENTURY. A woman, 70 years of age, who was married over half a century ago, was granted a decree nisi recently on the ground of the misconduct of lier husband, who was 75. The petitioner was Mrs. Maud Mary Imlacli, Liverpool, and the respondent was Charles Imlacli, described as a professional man. The misconduct of Mr. Imlacli was alleged to have taken place in 1925 at a bungalow at Cross Lane, Bevington, Cheshire, with a woman about 40 years of age. The suit was undefended. DIRTIER SHIRTS. A curious and not unamusing sidelight on the effect that the prevailing depression is having in Victoria ani South Australia was provided by delegates from those States to the Laundry Conference who declared that people there were now wearing »their shirts and collars longer before having them washed than they used to in more prosperous times. They said that while the depression in those States had not affected the number of bundles of washing received, it had a noticeable effect on the size of the bundles. TOM SAYERS LINK. Mr. and Mrs. David John Warnett, of Tonbridge, who celebrated their diamond wedding recently, have received a telegram of congratulation from the King . and Queen. Until four years ago Mr. Warnett, who is 81, was licensee of the Blacksmith's Arms, Hadlow, which had been in possession of the family for nearly three centuries. He was well acquainted- with the famous Tom Sayers, who used to visit a forge which belonged to the Warnetts and stving the sledge hammer when he was training for his memorable fight with John Heenan at Farnborough in 1860. BEQUEST TO LOUVRE. Senor Carlos de Bektegui recently bequeathed his magnificent art collection to the French nation. T'he gem of the collection, which will revert to the Louvre Museum ou the owner's death, is the portrait of the Marquise de la Solana, by Goya. There are also portraits by Rubens, Van Dyck, Lawrence, Nattier, David and

Ingres. Senor de Beistegui, who is a Mexican citizen tout by 'birth a Spanish Basque, has lived in France for the past 50 years. The French Government recognised his munificence by creating him a Commander of the Legion of Honour. LIVES RISKED FOR A DOG. Two Beacby Head signalmen risked their lives in a two hours' climb to save a dog which had fallen over the cliff. The dog had landed on a ledge 250 ft from the top, and the two men, Messrs. Warren and Bearn, volunteered to attempt a rescue. Other signalmen and passers-by lowered them over with ropes at separate points 40ft apart. Great care was necessary owing to the treacherous condition of the cliff, and once Bearn was half engulfed in an avalanche of falling stones and rock released by the rope. Both men reached the ledge. Bearn took the dog and with. Warren climbed and was pulled to the top again. INSECT COLLECTOR'S DEATH. It was suggested at the inquest on Herbert Marriott, 23, of Northampton, who had teen missing, and whose body was taken from the river later on, that he fell into the water while searching for insects. A hook with a wooden handle a foot long was found on the body. Marriott had particularly fine collections of moths and butterflies, it was stated, obtained in forests in the neighbourhood, but those sources were now closed and he had been searching rushes' by t'he river for specimens of larvae. The hook was used for scraping rubbish from trees and for finding grubs, from which he obtained insects. Marriott had never threatened suicide, and had commented on the absurdity of it. An open verdict was returned. VANISHED NOTES. The disappearance of money and papers lends mystery to the discovery of Jessie Alice Fordham, 44, of Bristol Road, Forest Gate, who was found dead in a mews at the rear of Parliament Place, Forest Gate. In her left hand was a bottle containing a poisonous disinfectant. At the inquest at West Ham Allen Douglas Fordham, an engine turner, said that recently his wife had been depressed and had had unfounded suspicions about him. When he returned home the night before, his wife

was not there, and on a table was a note in which she stated that he had turned against her. The next day he missed the deeds of the house, his cheque book and Army papers. His wife used to carry £100 in notes about with her, and he had just given her £14 10/. All the' money had disappeared and had not been traced. Death was stated to be due to disinfectant poisoning, and a verdict of suicide while of unsound mind was recorded. SOVIET CITY MADE TO ORDER. Commissioned by the Soviet Government to build a city to house 35,000 people, Mr. A. S. Austin, of the firm of Austin and Co., New York contractors and engineers, spent a few days in London prior to continuing his journey to Russia. Mr. Austin said that the contract was offered to a number of British and other European contractors, but was awarded to the American company upon their undertaking to complete the entire city within fifteen months. The cost to the Soviet Government will he, approximately, £10,000,000. The city is to be built in an endeavour to establish a motor industry within the Soviet, and the contract also calls for the construction of a huge automobile factory, capable of a production of 100,000 cars a year. The industry will be modelled upon the Ford organisation. A number of Russian engineers are being sent to the Ford factories in Detroit, and it is understood they will be given free instruction in return for a large ■ contract for machinery for the Russian factory. THE EXPENSIVE ORCHID. Orchids, which are at the same time among the easiest -and most expensive flowers to cultivate were some of the chief exhibits at the Royal Horticultural Society s show at Westminster recently. Most people have an idea that orchids are very difficult to grow," said one exhibitor. "This is a fallacy. As a matter of fact they are more easily grown than most hothouse plants, for the majority of them live on air, and take their nourishment more from the atmosphere than from the soil. Thus, suitable atmospheric conditions, with a certain amount of moisture, are of the first importance. The reason they are so expensive to, rear is that they must either be imported abroad or grown from seed. To i P ■ them, of course, means expense, and to rear them from seed is as^xpeasie, because it is years increasingly Orchids are becoming fe£ though I "they : are Sr^d. f expend sive 'In America," said another Smart "where they are even more popular than here, and where the people have more money to' spend on luxuries, a woman considers nothing of giving fror £1 to £2 for an orchid buttonhole."

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Bibliographic details

NEWS FROM ALL QUARTERS., Auckland Star, Volume LXI, Issue 139, 14 June 1930, Supplement

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2,320

NEWS FROM ALL QUARTERS. Auckland Star, Volume LXI, Issue 139, 14 June 1930, Supplement

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