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MOTORING

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~ TOO COMPLICATED.

STANDARD ROAD SIGNS,

-FEELING IN TARANAKI.

are something like demented macaroni —fish hooks, pot hooks, and alii sorts of hooks," said Mr. W. G. Watlkley, of Hawera (secretary of the South Taranaki Automobile Association), when, at the annual meeting of the.. Stratford branch, he referred to the standard road sigrs recently introduced by the Main Highways Board, says the Hawera '^Star." When other regulations had been introduced the motorists' associations had been consulted, proceeded Mr. Walkley. Had the motorists been consulted in this matter it was practically certain that such a weird set of symbols would never have been sanctioned. The boird apparently had forgotten that signs had already been posted by associations in many parts of the country. These could be easily read and understood, but the new signs would be a series of puzzles to the average driver. If standard signs were set it was essential,that they should be simplified. He considered that there should be no alteration to regulations without reference tot -the associations representing the motorists. "There seems about 50 of these queer hieroglyphics, and I'll swear they would be quite unintelligible to the average driver "-unless he was given a special education," said Mr. S. A. Ward, the chairman of the Stratford committee. "When a driver comes to a bend he'll have to pull out a notebook to see what tho sign means. They are absurd, and we should protest against them." "Altogether-hopeless," was the description used by the Rev. J. L. A. Kayll. He urged that motorists should have the benefit of simple eigns instead of difficult symbols.

Mr. D.; jj. Mnlone {president of the branch) said it was .highly desirable, that signs should' be short and expressed in plain 'tßtniai: *No doubt the new signs mean-- something," said the president, %ut" ■tiie'ejucation of drivers concerning their significance ingoing ;to be difficult and may .lead to a great deal of confusion.Th3''automobile associations have done a great deal, and the nevv' signs seeril. to be superfluous." ' Mr. Kayll moved: "That this meeting emphatically protests against the road •igns provided by Government regulations and considers that any sign other than an explicit direction or ; warning provides a definite source of danger to motor traffic." ' In seconding the motion Mr. Ward also criticised sjtrongly the new requirement of the Public W ol 'ks Department that ro?,d signs should not be more than 3ft 6in high. This Mr. Ward described as "another absurd provision." He also attacked the provision that signs should be placed on the left in all cases, as while the principle was good it was not always applicable. . The motion was carried unanimously. Hear Reflectors. Mr. G.j A. Carter moved: "That this branch of; the South Taranaki Automobile Association supports the objection of the North Island Motor Union to the regulation making it compulsory to have red rear reflectors on motors, particularly p,s the onus is placed on motorists to keep a rear light burning; also that red reflectors on push bicycles are not considered effective and that the regulations should pFovide for the equipment of push bicycles with red lights in lieu of reflectors." The motion was carried unanimously. Referring to both resolutions, the president--pointed out that, they were not intended to convey dissatisfaction with the motor-regulations as a whole, it being recognised that those adopted after consultation with the motorists' association? were in the best- interests of road lisers.

NO HOWKING AT MIGHT.

According,'tA the Paris correspondent <>f the "Baity Mail," in two days in Paris Inst mootj|vj47 summonses were issued «aainst' taxi-driversand private motorics, new regulation,; requiring *• ••-fit a.m. and s,a.rri. all car.s must be dfiven at a speed rendering it sound signals at turnings a lid floss-roads. The 1 , use of', horns .and hooters is; : prohibited; eVen in thie main boulevard and: avenues.-

STEADY GROWTH.

MOTOR TRADE MEMBERS. 100 PER CENT INCREASE XN" TWO YEARS. The number of members on the register has shown a considerable increase during the year, and is now nearly double what it was two years ago, says the report of the New Zealand Motor Traders' Association, presented at the annual conference at Nelson last week. The members under each section for the past year and the previous two years are as follow:— 1928. 1927. 1926 Garage proprietors .... 757 574 505 Accessory dealers 4 2 1 Blec. and battery section 32 9 1 Petrol section 137 69 — Tyre section 158 53 10 Wholesalers' section .... 13 14 14 Motor cycle section .... 11l 116 114 1202 837 645

HARRISON AND GASH, LTD.

MR. GASH RETIRES FROM FIRM. One of the oldest firms in the motor trade in Auckland, Messrs. Harrison and Gash, of Khyber Pass Road, has undergone a change in ownership from the beginning of this month. Mr. Gash retires from the firm, which has been taken over by Mr. Harrison, who will continue the business in the old premises under the title of Harrison and Gash, Ltd. Mr. Harrison has taken into partnership his two sons, who have recently returned from England, where they have been for two years gaining experience at the Morris factory and other works. A full range of Morris cars will be carried, and no doubt the new firm will meet with the success it deserves. Mr. J. N. Seeman, factory representative for Morris Motors, is at present in Auckland, and will motor through the Dominion.

THE NEW HARLEY DAVIDSON MODEL.

| The' consistent demand for a motor I cycle of medium power las /been answered in the new'range of 1929 Harley Davidson by the addition of the new :5.0-h.p. model twin. The motor has a Very clean appearance—all working parts, including the throttle controlled lubricator, being completely enclosed. Power is transmitted from the motor by means of a silent duplex chain drive. The generator is gear driven and is provided with the new 1929 output controller. An- outstanding feature is the fitment of two Bullett headlights, which are very trim in appearance, and will add to the safety of night riding. A flew Klaxon high' " frequency horn is neatly located between the two headlights. The new electrical panel groups ignition and light, switches arid a new built-in ammeter in an attractive panel lighted by a small hooded parking lamp —visible from front and rear. Another new fitting is the four tube muffler, which is being introduced on nil models. All the above features are ineluded as standard equipment on 1929 models. The opening display is announced for this evening at Messrs. Merson Bros.' garage.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19281002.2.146

Bibliographic details

MOTORING, Auckland Star, Volume LIX, Issue 233, 2 October 1928

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1,085

MOTORING Auckland Star, Volume LIX, Issue 233, 2 October 1928

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