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RACING NEWS.

STABLE AND TRACK NOTES. ( r.y WIIALKRONE.) UXTLUES L'Ui; THE SEASON. '"•? J-. 1-t. 10—Wi'iiinpion R.C. ' 1 ' — W'.uinale Hunt Club. ju .v Souiti Canterbury tlunt. July 'js,, p,u— Uishorue K.C. July Ct:-isrruiirch Hunt. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. • i M .1". • i. : ]>or>ps who ' - ' ' during Ins career were: ..1; ii. I )e.-;'i I Cold. itaz- \\ aq.iane. Affectation. I'! i!:it■;;11• -. iii'i i i.e. ]!;;ll\niena, Heauaiul IVnrel. It was in the C..T.C. ( h.iile l rje Stakes thai lie \v;h lei'i many lengths and Kaz/.le Dazzle heat J" lll( ' North Island Challenge stakes at Wellington, lie fell at the ■tart and the places were tilled by \\arplai:c. Affectation and Printemps. 1 hi' Stitala lilly Delicious has l>cen ■u re'.iesed from Mr. G. D. Greenwood, ind placed in J. Bcale's stable. I lie New Zealanders Stormy and I'.ree/.y were nut taken to the Menangle '| 1 -'• inji> last Tuesday, and their owner was lined X.2 for late scratching. Killute lias been doing well since he '.oed at tile Auckland meeting in June. I lie brown gelding is due to leave for I'retitliam to-morrow, to fulfil engagements at tlie Wellington winter meeting. Endorse, bv Paper Money from Epi'iiplt. is among the rising two-year-olds | being worked at Trentliam. This filly to;: y do her early .spring racing over in 'I'iry. providing she trains on satisfact; i:;i the interval. 'he Newcastle jockey, A. OrrelE has a eeptcd an engagement to ride in India. I I'irell was in India a couple of seasons and had several important victories. He v.as in New Zealand a few seasons bark and lode at several meetings. W. Patterson has now added to his the bay Glenulbyn gelding Gleii'iglit. So far this horse has done very! little racing, but in several of liis school- ! ing tasks at. Ellerslie, when trained by 1.. ('. Rae, lie gave promise of developing into a useful juniper. Cliaritaine, Eiery Lad. Automne, and Furore have commenced activc work ajrain at Ellerslie, under P. Conway's charge. The above horses have been doing plenty of useful exercise around the roads, and they are all in nice condition at the present time. •Toy Ride is once again among the regular workers at Ellerslie, under J. Buchanan's care. The chestnut gelding is very much in the rough, and one ofhis knees appears to be enlarged somewhat, although it does not so far seem to trouble hjpi at all in his work. War Officer has started work again under R. E. Brown's chargc at headquarters. He has done well, and is carrying a lot of condition at the present time, while there is every chance of the bay Warplane-— Eady Officer gelding racing in improved form during the coming season. Vice Versa, who joined W. Tozer's stable a short time ago, is to be put into active commission again at once. The Penury gelding, who ljas not raced for some time, won the Takapuna Hurdles at that club's summer meeting two seasons ago, and lias raced very little in the interval. i Fred Gilchrist indulged his three juve- ! niles, Nankin Blue, the Lucullus—Avon Park lilly, and the Seremond—Lute String colt, in barrier practice r.t Ellerslie this morning. The two former are well forward in condition, and Lave been shaping well in their track work at headuarters. Sir Archie is again being prepared at Ellerslie by F. Stenning, and the big chestnut son of Archiestown is in great condition just at present. He should be quite capable of paying his way tiuring the coming racing season, for he has shown plenty of pace in the few races which he has contested. Mrs. M. G. Mcintosh, of- Gisborne, in whose interests White Fang has been winning in Sydney, recently leased a relation of the gelding, White Polly by name, to Mr. F. MeNee. White Polly is a rising five-year-old mare by Polvdamcn front C'heddite. the latter-mare being the. maternal grandam of White Fang. Rina Manga was shipped to the South on Wednesday of last week. It is understood that the King Lupin— Semolina Filly has joined J. Beale's stable at Riccarton. Rina Manga was placed on several occasions around the country meetings, and should be equal to winning a race at the smaller meetings around Canterbury. W. Cough, whose training quarters are at Avondalc, has added to his team Mis? Mavis, a rising thrt«!-year-old .filly bj Borneo from Sweet Auburn, who, •\lthough only a pony in size, is stated to be a good sort. The same trainer has taken in hand two three-year-old fillies by Prince Meriwee from Lady Electra and Birkenrain respectively. Heroic, who retired from the turf at the conclusion of the A.J.C. autumn meeting, and was tiien taken to W. Booth's stables at Rosehill to be "let down," has gone to Tarwyn Park, Rylstone, where he will do stud duty. He was accompanied by Greenwich, who is being spelled, and Gloaming's. Sister. The latter has again been retired to the stud. Areheno has commenced activc work again at Ellerslie, after a short spell since she raced at the Auckland winter meeting. The brown mare looks nic« and fresh after her holiday, although she has not put on a great amount of condition. Areheno won four races during this season, and has paid her way well, for she was not raced very extensively. When Zircon won the Winter Hurdles at 1 rentham last season he carried 9.9 "J'.y. Handicapped in the same event t-us season with 10.8, he is set a much naider task as far as weight is eon'•orncd; still the chestnut gelding has een racing m splendid form during the ;°"t "Stings, and, having proved him,l weight-carrier, lie should M»i« yrar. 1

J ELLERSLIE TRACK NOTES. There was little doing in the way of fast work at Ellerslie this morning. The No. o grass was open for the benefit j of horses that are competing at the j Wellington Winter meeting. The iirst to work was Beau" Cavalier, who traversed a round in 1.50, the last six furlongs of which he covered in 1.24 3-5. The Great Northern winner ■ went well throughout tho full journey. ! Passionate was better than Killute} over six furlongs, which occupied 1:22 '• 3-59. ; Kamehameha and Rahepoto we're com- ', pan ions over a round, completing the j distance in 1.49 2-5, the last seven fur- J longs taking 1.39 2-5. The former was ' going the better at the finish,, and he is a greatly improved horse. COSTLY NEW ZEALANDERS. Since they arrived from New Zealand a few months ago the geldings Clarus and Le Ohoucas have been costly propositions says an Australian writer. Each went out favourite for a j division of the Flying Welter Handi- J cap on Saturday week, and while. Le i Choucas was only just beaten,! Clams turned round the wrong way when the barrier was released, and his chance then was hopeless. The second division favourite, Le Choui-as, jumped away smartly, but ho soon lost his position, and this cost him the race, for in the meantime Reference, had cleared away, and, making every post a winning one, had only a neck to spareat th; , iini>h. Lc Choucas came home siror.giy, but the task of making up the leeeway was too much ft. , him. SPEEDY TEA LEAF. The New Zealand-bred filly Tea Leaf] gave nothing else a chance in the third division of the Flying Handicap at Victoria Park, says a Sydney writer. Wallace McDuff was the early favourite for the race, but a few minutes before barrier rise a big commission was launched in Tea Loaf's favour, and she eventually wound up favourite. Settling down behind Lord Rino, Tea Leaf took charge approaching the turn, and was not afterwards headed. Over the final, half furlong the filly was "on the bit," and she passed the post four! lengths in advance of Lingar. 1 THE GRAND PRIX. I "Has Fiance any horse in this year's j Derby capable of repeating the 1914 | success of Durbar?" According to the Paris correspondent of the London "Sporting Life" that question was boinp asked about the middle of May, and it had special reference to the capabilities of Mon Talisman, the then French hope for the Derby, who was two days later in the Prix Noailles at Longchamp. The colt, however, did not start in that race, and this notwithstanding the sporting writer referred to said that in any case he did not think Mon Talisman would trouble any of the horses engaged at Epsom.- His judgment was sound, for Mon Talisman was even beaten in the Grand Prix, run over a mile and seven furlongs, last week, by Fiterari, a brown colt by Sartlanaple from Miss Bachelor, who was bred in Ireland in 1919 by Sir George Murray, and imported to France in 1922. Miss Bachelor is by Bachelor's Double from Ella Simon, *by Jeddah I from Simonella, by St. Simon. Fiterari has won several good races this season, and on the same course earlv in May he secured the Poule d'Essai des Poulains (2000gns). Mon Talisman, who is by Craigan Eran from the Lemberg mare Euthene, won the Prix Juigne, and then followed it up by taking the Prix Dam early this season. The third horse, Flamant, is a chestnut by San le Sou from Faisanderie, but he has done very little of note. ASCOT GOLD CUP. Sir A>j3 Bailey is the proud possessor of the Ascot Gold Cup, a trophy valued at £500, for which the race was run on the old Heath last month. His five-year-old brown horse Tbxlaw is by Son-in-law from Alope, by Gallinule from Attoviscar, by Donovan. He was bred by his owner, but he apparently did not start early this season. Last year lie failed in the Ascot Stakes; won the Northumberland Plate, two miles, at Newcastle; won the Jockey Club Stakes, one mile six furlongs, at Ncwmarke*; was not placed in the Cesare witch Stakes; and on the same course finished some distance back in the Jockey Club Cup. There were 54 nominations for this year's race. The Cup race was abandoned in 1915, 1916, 1917, and 1918, but substitute events were run at Newmarket. Royal Ascot's history, apart from the racing, provides outstanding incidents that apparently other racing grounds in the Old Country have not experienced. A cable message from London refers to a robbery from a dwelling near the Heath after the racing; and this recalls the theft of the valuable trophy some years ago. The Cup was placed on a red velvet covering on a table in the pnblic—-not the Royal—enclosure, and before the first race a man wearing an overcoat came along and picked up the cup. It was not seen afterwards. The popular musical comedy, "Our Miss Gibbs," .was written round this incident. ■

M. McCarten, who was subjected to a hostile demonstration from a section of the crowd at Rosehill on. Saturday when he won on The Thorn, has for some seasons been recognised as one of the leading horsemen in Australasia. It is interesting to note that the sporting writers in Sydney consider that the N,ew Zealandcr's riding was not faulty the previous week when The Thorn was Ivpiiten at Moorefield. j

HURRY ON'S PROGENY. The success of tho progeny ai Hum On in the English Derby i s of particular interest to Australian owners who are fortunate enough to possess stallions bv that horse's sire, Marcovil. When Mr Hunter White, an A.J.C. eommitteeman was in England, he secured the sire Roger de Busli. n chestnut horse bred in j 1020 by Hurry On from St. Genevieve, by j St. Amant, for whom a price, stated to be in the vicinity of 20,000gns, was refused early in his eareur. Roger de Busli is now located at Havilah,"where his oldest foaTs are yearlings. Already ; Australia has had previous experience of j the Earculdinc line through Linaere I I imp I, one of the most successful I stallions that ha? been brought out. HARD TO FOLLOW. I Under the above heading the "Sydney Morning Herald," commenting upon the Mooretiolrl Handicap, won by Stormy, says:—-'Middle-distance handicap form is exceedingly difficult to follow nowadays, and this wa« never so conclusively demonstrated than in the Moorefield Handicap on Saturday. Cyron. who was not further back than second in tho Canterbury Handicap, with !'st. the j same weight as he had on Saturday, eeri tainly looked to have a great ehavicr. ! although the Moorefield field was a 1 It— j tie stronger, and. in consequence, he was rushed when operations began on the event. At one stajrc it looked like him starting at a very short price, but gradually the price receded, until a fair price was available. C'yrou never looked like a winnrr at any st.i<;e. while tho New Zealandcr. Stormy, who did not appear Rble to raise a gallop at Gosford on Tuesday, moved un smartly from the half-mile and. finishing- well, just -manned to beat Garrula. who had made •ill the running, by a nock. Those owners who had been offered Stormy and Breezy during the past week or so for something like £3000. are probably wishing that Il">v had closed on the deal. It I was pointed out previously that the form of New Zoalanders at Gosford would not be taken as their best, but, at the same time, it was not, thought that Stormy was capable of such rapid improvement, notwithstanding: that he had mot with interferons at the stnrt of the Gosford Stewards' Milo. On that occasion it took him a!I bi< time tn forrre ahead nf the very mediocre performer My Son. Apparently the drop in the weighth (at Gosford Stormy oerrirrl 10.2 and ran third * was n materia' factor in j remarkable improvement. Wli«n the ! horses rotuniprl to Iho enclosure o*i Sathirdav. a section of the rrc.vil rlnition"traced against the winner with *\\c]i remarks as "What nhout C!o?-fnril running." ''Rub him out." : _ _ j JWHAT DISQUALIFICATION MEANS. To those whose livelihood is earned on the racecourse, disqualification is a serious blow, and in some instances it means the stoppage of all income. Tin* is embarrassing for a jockey who rides a limited number of winners, but m «.ne who is at the top of his form and is "making hay while the sun shines,' it is of more serious concern, says the Sydney Morning "Herald." It is a coincidence that M. McCarten. who was disqualified by the A.J.C. Stewards for tweho months over the running of Royal Despatch, has this year earned the greatest ponvntnge in the metropolitan area, his total being £702; Of this amount, £.">o."> was earned at the A.J.C. autumn meeting. When one takes irlo account the additional amounts received from winning owners in the form of I doccurs, it is realised that the position of a successful jockey is financially an enviable one. S. Davidson, the Newcasf !•> apprentice, who is at the head of the winning jockeys' list for the season, and who has ridden more than 100 winners, has earned £686 in percentage in the metropolitan area, while J. Munro, who has been disqualified for 12 months over the running of Songift at Canterbury Park, has received £608. Munro has had more remunerative seasons than this one, and probably iie received most this season over the success of Amouius in the Epsom Handicap, when he had almost a last-minute engagement. J. Toohey's percentage cheque for the current season amounts to £505, while J. Pike, whose opportunities are limited tn account of increasing weight, has received £398. The lightweight, J. Simpson, has had a fairly successful timo, end he has drawn about" £350. • DISQUALIFIED FOR LIFE. For the stipendiary stewards to take n hand in the selection of a rider for a horse is not an uncommon occurrence in Australia. They are not loath to use this power, especially when there is an ominous drift in the quotations in the* betting ring. Ata recent meeting at Kedron Park, Queensland, the activities of the stewards in this direction led to a rather uncommon, conclusion. Honour Garde was an acceptor for the third division of the Park Handicap, and, .opening at a short price, eased in the market until 10 to 1 was available. By that time the horses had left the enclosure, but the stewards recalled Honour Garde and sought to substitute G. Draper for the rider C. Hobbs. An argument arose, and subsequently at the instigation of those concerned with the horse, Honour Garde was taken to the stalls. The stewards questioned the lessee, H. Alexander, who, it is alleged, stated that he refused to let anyone else ride the horse, "when their money was on." The stewards were not long in making up their minds to disqualify Honour Garde, Alexander, and Hobbs for life. The disqualification is causing keen interest in the northern State, where, it is claimed, it is not only the first of its kind in Queensland, but also in Australia. CAUGHT IN THE ACT. '"" There is a man in Sydney to-day who had an unpleasant memory revived when he read a week ago how the clerk of the Pokoblin course reported to the stipendiary steward that he had found an electric battery inside the jacket of a lad who had been injured in a race. The old case occurred a few years ago at a registered meeting in Western Australia. A race had almost finished when a horse threw its rider in the straight. That would not have troubled the boy very much if he had been able to pick himself up, but he was knocked unconscious, and bystanders rushed to his assistance. When he was examined a battery was found to be concealed in his clothing. Caught in the act, all explanation failed, and he was disqualified for life. i '. Although the use of a battery has often been suspected,. 51 is seldom that the wrongdoer is bowled out. A case, however, occurred in Adelaide toward the end of last season when one of the stewards saw a jockey from West Australia throw away a battery on his way back to scale. That boy, who steadfastly declined to implicate anyone else, was sent out for life.

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RACING NEWS., Auckland Star, Volume LVIII, Issue 156, 5 July 1927

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RACING NEWS. Auckland Star, Volume LVIII, Issue 156, 5 July 1927

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