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RACING NEWS.

■ STABLE AND TRACK NOTES. (By WHALEBONE.) FIXTURES FOK THE SEASON July 2—Astaburton County B.C. July 12, 14, 16—Wellington B.C. July 21—Waimate Hunt Club. July 23—South Canterbury Hunt July 28, 30—Glsborne R.C. July SO—Christ church Bant Chiekwheat is getting through strong "work at Riecarton, in view of the Ashburton and Trentham races. The weights for the Melbourne Cup are due to make their appearance to-day. The Southern-owned Cassolette is being kepi up to the collar by F. W. Ellis, witfi a view to being raced at the Wellington Racing Club's meeting. The French jockey, George Stern, has won thirteen Derbies—one in England, seven in France, two in Germany, two in Austria, and one in Belgium. Messrs. Pyne, Gould, and Guinness, Ltd., have effected the sale of the brown gelding Battle Colours, by Satisfaction, from Mr. G. A. Karn to Mr. D. Campbell, of Riecarton. The hurdler Relic, by Calibre from Lady Talbot, has been purchased by the Wingatui trainer C. Christie, who will probably take the gelding to Trentham as a mate for the steeplechaser Cartoon. Four horses went to the post in a race at Nar Nar Toon, Victoria, and a triple dead-heat occurred. This must be an absolutely unique performance. The result would not, we imagine, be popular with the "'Tbooks." Tanadees was put into work at Trentham a week or two ago, but subsequently developed a severe cold. Veterinary attention became necessary, and it is reported that . the Hoseworthy gelding is in a bad way. The Riecarton trainer, D. Campbell, has purchased the Otago-bfed three-year-old, Battle Colours, by Solferino from Satisfaction. He has some useful form to his credit this season, and he should do his new owner good service as a four-year-old. Trentham reports credit Pantagruel with doing good work and he may be a competitor in the Winter Cup and other events at the Grand National meeting. He went amiss a year 'ago, after running third in the - 'Raukawa* •Clip* at' Otahi, but he is quite sound again. It appears certain that, if the weights suit, Whenuanui will make the trip to Trentham next month (says He is hitting out freely on the tracks, and apparently the. easier going will be relished by him,,as it was partly due to the state of the tracks that he was given a spell after his successful campaign last autumn. The Southland trainer, F. J. McKay, has not done a great deal with Mr:. W. T. Hazlett's horses since their arrival at Riecarton, but as soon as the weather and track conditions improve he will be sending them along in useful • tasks. None of the southern team will go to Trentham, but they should be in good order for engagements at the Grand National meeting. At Riecarton the other morning -The Harp, Sunny Loch, and Blue Hall were sent over three flights of hurdles. The Harp lost ground at the first fence, and just when he caught the leaders at the second fence, Sunny Loch crossed over in front of him. However, The Harp went on again, and jumped the last obstacle in good style. Sunny Loch -was -goingwell at the conclusion of the round* while Blue Hall jumped well throughout. There was not much between the trio at the finish. . Owing to the parlous plight of racing in Ireland the authorities are seriously considering- the- inauguration of Sunday meetings, says an. English writer. Those interested are testing public opinion. They urge that Sunday racing will attract sportsmen from England if good sport is provided, and that there will be good attendances. Owing to depleted resources many clubs are now in severe straits. Meanwhile breeders are asked to race the best* horses instead of selling them to Eng-' lish owners. "Pilot," of the Sydney "Referee," in discussing the prospects of A.J.G. Derby candidates, does not hold out much hope of any New South Wales horse winning the race. He writes: "Greenline and Beckwith are our best two-year-olds, and they are by Greenstead, who may not sire stayers. Early in the spring there may be marked development by something that has not yet shown form of particular value, but at present it would be difficult to pick a.Sydney two-year-old that is sure to be a stumbling-block in the way of the success' fn' the AJ.C. Derby of the best of the Victorians. New Zealand opposition has also to be taken into account." The New Zealand opposition to the best of the Australians will probably be Agrion, whose racing during the season stamped him as a very likely Derby winner.

The death is reported from Christchurch of Charles Stratford, who in his day was one of the most capable and certainly the most vigorous finisher in New Zealand, says a Dunedin writer. "Charlie" was the last of the "long legs," and persevered with the old-time seat to the last, as he still used it when noticed riding exercise on the eve of the last Great Autumn meeting at Riorarton. In 1893 he won the Stewards , Handicap on Au Revoir, and in 1894 the Dunedin Cup and Wanganui Cup on Liberator. He also won the Wellington Cup on The Poet., These, were' his most notable wins,* and* "he "asso. scored on Artillery in the'D.J.XX Champagne Stakes. One of the most ' notable finishes that ever took place on the old Forbury Park course was between Stratford on Au Revoir and T. Buddicombe on Beadonwell. They fought out a battle royal nearly all the way up the straight, with both riders hard at it over the final 100 yards, with demonish vigour. They flashed past the r<ost together, and the judge could "not separate them. Such finishes are not, seen nowadays, because the average rider site too short to* get the last ounce out of a .horse, who not infrequently lias to nmsh on_hw own and just for the love of Stratford was very ojd brigade, and Mi £w «£* dee byall who

The walk-up start continues to grow in favour in Victoria, and its success there is creating a strong agitation for its restoration in other Australian States.

The New Zealand Racing Conference made the usual donation of £600 this season to the New Zealand Sports Protection League. It was debited against the stipendiary steward's account.

Assurance is one of the regular workers on the Riccarton tracks. He is being got ready to race, at the Grand National meeting, but he is rather backward at present, as a result •of his autumn spell.

Prodice, a full sister to Phaola, is reported to be doing well under F. Loomb's guidance at Te Awamutu. She will most likely be a starter in the Avondale Stakes next spring, providing all goes well with her in ihe interval.

Tarleton was given a trial over the big hurdles just recently at Riccarton, and the bay gelding is reported to have jumped well. He will probably have his first run over hurdles at the Ashburton meeting which takes place on July 2.

Red Sea., one of the juveniles at present being educated by F. W. Ellis, in Southland, is by Valkyrian from Whitianga. The chestnut filly who was bred by Mr. W. C. Ring, of Hinuera, is stated to be showing quite a lot of promise in her work.

Brightling was turned out for a spell after racing unsuccessfully at the Dunedin Jockey Club's meeting early this month. It is now reported from the south that when he resumes training it will be as an inmate of C. Giesler's Wingatui stable.

Master Doon was given a run over six furlongs on the No. 3 grass at Ellerslie on Saturday morning. The Lucullus gelding went in his Lest style and appeared to relish the heavy going, while he promises to strip in great fettle when again required to race.

Passionate and Kamehameha, were associated in a gallop over a round of the No. 3 grass at headquarters on Saturday morning. They were not ridden out and covered the journey in 1.47 3-5, with Passionate, who had the worst of the weights, going the best at the finish.

The Lucullns-Avon Park filly trained by F. Gilchrist, is one of the most forward of the rising in work at EUerslie at the present time. This filly, who is well grown for one of her age, hicks nothing as far as quality goesi and although she has not yet been required to gallop fast, her track work is full of promise.

Americans «re strong believers in advertisement, and some breeders advertise the names of the mares sent to their stallions, and at the same time take the opportunity of thanking the owners for their patronage. Nor does a studowner lose anything by the announcement that owners of high-class mares are patronising his stallions.

When Master Arch negotiated the pony hurdles at Ellerslie on Saturday morning, it was his third try out as a jumper. Ridden by S. Henderson, he fenced really well, particularly so at the second attempt when the pace was well on. The Marble Arch gelding jumps with plenty of dash, and does not attempt to run about at all at his fences.

H. Donovan has been recommended for a trainer's license. He has a Balboa tony under his. care and he should soon hare other horses. Donyvan is one of the Dominion's veteran.;joNkeys. He has done very little race riding in recent years, though he has continued to attend reguarly at the Riccarton tracks, where hie services havjj been highly valued by trainers.

The present intention of Mr. R. A. McKenzie is to send Piuthair and Clarinda to Sydney for the spring racin« there. They have also had engagement! made for them in Melbourne, but poesibly they will miss that part of the -trip, returning in time to race at Trentham in October, and then coming on to Riccarton for the Canterbury Jockey Club meeting.

Through his progeny, Carbine's name of ten crops up in England. His grandson, Spion Kop, has already been represented by one smart two-year-old this season. This is a filly named Kopje, whose dam, Dutch Mary, is by William the Third from Pretty Polly, and she won the First Spring Two-Year-Old Stakes, of £1030, at Newmarket, on April 26. The winner was bred by her owner, laeut.-Col. G. Loder. The unplaced high-priced runners included the Aga Khan'a 4000gns colt, Hakim (Friar Marcus—Honora), who finished ahead of Three Star H., with whom the lastmentioned owner declared to win. As a general rule it may be said that racing men are philanthropically inclined. The late Mr. T. A. Stirton, one of Sydney's most prominent sportsmen, who died last year, had the reputation of performing many charitable acts during has lifetime, and many institutions will benefit under hie will. The Sydney "Referee" says: "Although it was known that the late Mr. Stirton was rich, it created a little surprise when the net value of his estate was sworn for probate at £296,650. His bequests took a wide range, and the institutions to benefit are the Sydney Hospital, Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales Home for Incurables, New South Wal«<» Institution for Deaf, Dumb and Blind, Royal Hospital for Women, and Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children

The defeat of Carbine in the Victorian Derby of 1888 has been revived by Touchstone" in the "Australasian," and lus remarks about the race drew comment from correspondents who, in common with the scribe mentioned above attributed the colt's defeat to .the fact that Derrett was caught napping'by Tom Hales on Ensign, who came with an electric rush and pipped him on the post The writer has heard another version of the defeat. In those days the whips in use were about twice as long as they are to-day, and when Ensign was putting in his run Derrett drew his whip on Carbine and unluckily hit the colt on a particularly tender part of his anatomy. Carbine flinched instead of striding out to the call of the fiagellator, and this made the difference between victory and defeat. It was shortly after this that the present-day dwarf whip came into vogue, and. it guards against a horse getting punished too deeply on the fltnk. Possibly there is some truth in the whip version, which the writer has heard from more than one old-time sport.

Gold Money, the rising two-year-old | half-sister to King Emerald, is doing nicely in her work at EUerslie. She also impresses one as being likely to turn out a useful filly, being built on very solid lines and possessing plenty of quality. In the list of two-year-olds mentioned in these columns a few days ago, the filly trained by W. Tozer, was described as being by Mountain Knight, whereas it should have been by Valkyrian. The filly referred to is a half-sister to Rahepoto. E. Pope expects to have Desert Knight in work early in July. The Mountain Knight-Merry Gain gelding has been doing plenty of road work during the last few months, and has built up very solid in condition. His dam, Merry Gain, who was by Merrie England—Come Again, won a number of races around the Wairarapa district some years ago, one of her most important wind being the Easte*- Handicap, of one mile and a-quarter, at the Wairarapa autumn meeting in the 191.". 10 season. AUCKLANDERS AT ROSEHILL. The Kosehill meeting, which was held on Saturday, had a flavour of Auckland about it, and the cabled results of the principal events show that the Quin Abbey gelding Stormy continues to prove he is more than useful. On his first visit to Australia Stormy created something of a sensation by winning a whole string of events on end. Certainly they were at small gatherings, but he always did his job so well that he created quite a lot of talk in certain quarters. On this, his second visit, Mr. H. VV. Burch's gelding is racing in much

stronger company, but tie is equally at home, and two races have gone down to his credit in the past couple of weeks. The Moorefield Handicap, which he won on Saturday, is endowed with only £250 in prize money, but many good horses contest the event. Another to. play a prominent role on Saturday was The Thorn, who was taken across to> .Sydney by J. Williamson. - • The son of Absurd was not quite equal (a -winning, the .Hurstville Handicap, but he made a bold bid, and after making most of the running, he was beaten over the last bit by Gladshot, a gelding by Validor. ■ ottts Mft'AwimL: • " It' is' reported' from' Ctiri#tcliurch that Geo. Price, who is at present in the Dominion, is negotiating for the pur-

chase of the Autumnus gelding Footfall. So far no deal has been made, but it can be assumed that if Mr. Dalgety parts with the ; gelding the consideration will be a fairly solid one. Footfall this season has proved himself a high-class handicap horse, and his performances in important handicaps, under substantial burdens, have earned him a place with the best, and he was very little short of weight-for-age form. There is every reason to> expect Footfall to go on improving, and if he does, and goes into Price's stable at Randwick, New Zealanders may look forward to seeing the gelding playing a prominent part in some of the important handicaps and perhaps weight- for-age events next season in Australia. All this, of course, if Mr. Dalgety sells to Price.

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Bibliographic details

RACING NEWS., Auckland Star, Volume LVIII, Issue 149, 27 June 1927

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2,574

RACING NEWS. Auckland Star, Volume LVIII, Issue 149, 27 June 1927

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