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SIR JAMES CARROLL.

DIES IN AUCKLAND. SOLDIER AND STATESMAN. NATIVE-BORN OitATOB. Many friends all over New Zealand will learn with extreme regret of the death of the Hon. Sir James Carroll, whicb occurred last evening at Rawhiti Hospital. The last public function at which Sir James took part was the unveiling of the memorial to his former colleague and close friend, Sir William Herries, at Te Aroha on October 9. Sir James came on to Auckland, and has remained here at the Ambassadors Hotel. He was at the races on .Saturday, and appeared in his usual health on Sunday. Yesterday morning he did not get up at the usual hour, and about 10.30 it became apparent that he was in a serious condition. He was removed to Rawhiti Hospital, unconscious, about 1 p.m. From the first it was feared that the end was near. During last session Sir James had a similar seizure, from which he recovered, which led his friends to hope that his life might again be prolonged, but his brilliant and varied career terminated at 8.15 last evening. The remains were removed to the mortuary of C. Little and Sons, Hobson Street, and from thence conveyed to St. Patrick's Cathedral, where a memorial service was held, after which the body was phu-ed on the s.s. Wainui, en route for Gisborne, where the interment will take place amongst his own people.

The Hon. Sir Jamea Carroll was born at Wairoa, Hawke's Bay, August 20, 1557. He was the son of Mr. Joseph Carroll, his mother being Tapuke, a chieftainess of the JSigatikahungunu tribe. He was educated at the Native School, Napier, and afterwards at one kept by a Mr. Thompson in the same town. As a boy he was at first selected by. a Tohunga to be trained in thp Priests School, but when eight years of age was taken out by his father. With other lads he volunteered for active service in the Urewera campaign in 1870. He was then only fourteen years of age and of splendid physique. He went on the war path with his tribe under the famous chief Major Ropata, of the

Ngatiporou, against the Hauhaus, under Te Kooti. He took part in the arduous campaign round Lake Waikaremoana, being for five months associated with Mr. E. F. Hamlin in pursuit of the Hauhau chief, travelling over wild and almost inaccessible country, during which the party underwent the greatest hardships. They captured over 150 prisoners and put an end to the activities of Te Kooti, who fled for refuge to the King Country. Mr. Carroll was awarded a bonus of fSO as well as the medal. His next step was as a cadet in the office of Mr. Locke, Native Commissioner for Hawke's Bay. After eighteen months he came under the notice of Sir Donald McLean, who transferred him to the Native Department, Wellington. Here he did gopd work, as Judge Eogan had in hand the duty of determining titles to native lands on the East Coast. Mr. Carroll at the age of 17 years was appointed interpreter, a position which his masterly knowledge of both Engling and Maori peculiarly fitted him for. In 1879, Mr. Carroll was appointed interpreter to the House of 'Representatives, which opened to him a more extensive field.

Entry into Politics.

Mr. Carroll was recognised as a firstrate speaker in either English or Maori. Added to that he was a most handsome man, of fine presence, and had a beautiful voice. In 1883 he resigned from the position of interpreter to the House of Representatives and contested the Eastern Maori electorate against Mr. Wi Pere. He had only a fortnight in which to operate and was defeated, but by only 23 votes. Sir G. M. O'Rorke, the then speaker of the House, urged Mr. Carroll to resume his position as interpreter, but he declined. At the election in 1886 Mr. Carroll' defeated Mr. Wi Pere by 200 votes. Thus he was afforded a new field in which to display bis great abilities. A writer of that day stated of Mr. Carroll: "Were he to do nothing else, hie efforts in the direction of the political and social union of the two races would hand his name down in New Zealand history" as that of a statesman of broad and comprehensive views, far seeing, and a benefactor alike to Maori and European. As one of the foremost young chiefs of the large and powerful Ngatikahungunu tribe, whose mana extends nearly the whole length of the East Coast of the Niorth Island, he exercises a vast influence with the native race, and his opinions on native questions naturally command the greatest attention. As an outcome of native representation, he is in himself a valuable and instructive lesson to the colonists." That prophecy was fully carried out during Mr. Carroll's long political career.

Native Land Laws. In 1890, Mr. Carroll was again elected, and the next year was appointed one of the three members of the Native Land Laws Commission by his Excellency Lord Onelow. To the report of that commission, Mr. Carroll submitted a memorandum in which he took a hopeful view of the future of the Maori race, which has since proved justified. Some time later, Mr. Carroll wrote: "Even the casual traveller through portions of the country more particularly inhabited by natives can scarcely fail to observe the many Maori children growing up healthy, well-fed and well-clad. This condition of things follows a peaceful industrious mode of living." The census just taken proves that Mr. Carroll was right in his deductions. Member of the Executive. In 1892, Mr. Carroll became a native member of the Executive without portfolio. In 1593 h e contested the European electorate of, Waiapu against Mr. C. A. De Latour, a trained barrister and solicitor, and was successful. In 1896 he was appointed Commissioner of Stamp Duties, Taxes and Representative of the Native Race in Parliament. Mr. Carroll was again elected for the same constituency in 1896, and the following year became Colonial Secretary, Commissioner of Stamps, and Native Adviser. In 1899 he was once more returned for the same seat, and was for a longtime Minister of Native Affairs. His influence was used to settle various troubles with the Maoris and he attended a great meeting at Rautoki, which resulted in the Urewera country being opened to Europeans.

Sir James Carroll paid a visit to England, and, after his return, was called to the Legislative Council, of which he was a member at the time of his death. He had the honour of being knighted by the King. By his mother's people, "Timi Kara" was looked up to as one who ever studied their true welfare. A genial good-natured man, he made friends wherever he went, and was one of the best examples of the commingling of the two races in New Zealand. On August 22, 1925, on the occasion of his sixtyeighth birthday, Sir James was tendered a great "hui" by the Maoris at Wairoa, at which he was presented with a fine carved walking stick and a handsome birthday book containing a hundred signatures. He also received a handsome oil painting.

A Keen Sportsman. In his early days Sir James Carroll was recognised as one of the finest athletes in New Zealand, being especially good at vaulting with the pole and also putting the stone. As a lad he distinguished himself riding at district race meetings in Hawke's Bay. Since the early seventies he was rarely without a racer. Some of his horses performed with distinction in the leading events at various courses. Amongst racers Sir James owned may be mentioned Mahutonga, the C.J.C. Winter Cup and Auckland Cup winner, Materoa, Mahiki, and Manawaru. He imported the horse Cynic from England, which, after running with moderate success in flat events, finished by winning the Great Northern Hurdles at Ellerslie. For many years Sir James was a member of racing clubs at Poverty Bay and Gisborne, having filled the office of president of the latter club. He also represented various clubs at Racing Conferences.

A number of handsome wreaths were forwarded by various organisations and friends of the deceased. One from the president, secretary, and Auckland members of the Executive of the National Party bore the words: —"In affectionate remembrance of an able statesman, a polished gentleman, and a lo}'al friend."

FUNERAL AT GISBOKNE. (By Telegraph.—Press Association.) GISBORNE, this day. The native tribes are already arranging to assemble for Sir James Carroll's funeral, which, at Lady Carroll's request, will take place at Gisborne, where a private burial ground has been set aside. The date and the details of the interment have not yet been fixed. A handsome wreath was forwarded by the Government and Mr. R. A. Wright, Minister of Education, attended the service in St. Patrick's Cathedral.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19261019.2.105

Bibliographic details

SIR JAMES CARROLL., Auckland Star, Volume LVII, Issue 248, 19 October 1926

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1,476

SIR JAMES CARROLL. Auckland Star, Volume LVII, Issue 248, 19 October 1926

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