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TURF NOTES.

(By "WHALEBONE.")

D. Brown, who had served his apprenticeship with the Orleigh Park stable at Flemington, has accepted an engagement to go to India, where he will be employed chiefly for J, Clarke's stable at Calcutta.

T. Butler, rider of Pildin and Dundalk, is the first professional jockey to win the Grand National Hurdle and Steeplechase double. Redleap's amateur rider, the late Mr. W. S. Cox, was on the great son of Dante when he won both races in 1892.

Backwood, winner of the 1924 Melbourne Cup, has taken up stud duties at Widden (N.S.W.), at a fee of 50gns. Claro, one of the best English sprinters seen in Australia, is standing on the same property at a fee of 200gns. One of the first mares to be sent to Backwood will be the Oakleigh Plate winner Poitrina.

After 20 years as a jockey, the South Australian, Jack Hopwood, is taking out a trainer's license. He keep a record of his riding, and his figures are illuminating. Since 1905 he has had 2390 mounts and 303 wins, 303 seconds, and 277 thirds. When he had his first ride in 1905 Hopwood went to the scale at 3st 101b. He.had ridden his 100 th winner by 1912, md by 1920 he had topped the 300 mark- His most successful season was in 1915-16, when he rode 34 winners, including the S.A. Derby and W.A.T.C. Stakes. He has won 21 cup races, and his biggest sequence of wins was seven. He has ridden nine trebles and 54 doubles.

Referring to the sale of the gelding Faircroft, purchased in England a few weeks ago by Mr. E. A. Connolly, a writer in a London paper states that the owner was desirous of retaining Faircroft at anything like a reasonable price, but Mr. would not be outbid. The writer says:—"There was no use in competing against a determined man like the Australian." This is exactly as Australians know the dashing "E.A." If he sets out to buy a horse in the sale ring, or anywhere else he always will take a lot of stopping. According to English advices, Mr. Connolly is making a collection of Selling Plate winners, and by the time he is ready to return he will have a nice little team to accompany him to Australia. Faircroft is one of the first of the stock of the Cambridgeshire winner, Brigand, to see a racecourse. Though a gelding, he realised 300 guineas at auction, this being 300 more than the buying in price of the Pontentila filly, who beat him so easily at the Gatwick meeting.

• Manna, the winner of the English Derby, -sustained a defeat in the Ascot Derby in June by Solario, who ran fourth to Manna in the first-mentioned race. Odds were laid on Manna,' but according to English writers, there were those who doubted the ability of Manna to give Solario lOlbs. Solario made all the running and won by a length and a-half from Sparus, who beat Manna by half a length. Both Solario and Sparus are by Gainsborough. On the same day Saucy Sue won the Coronation Stakes in a canter by ten lengths from Inca and two other starters. The question of who will win the Doncaster St. Leger is now being discussed and the chances of the unbeaten Saucy Sue are finding most favour. Saucy Sue is a half-sister to Tea Tray, standing at the Son. E W Alison's stud. The latter was sold as a yearling for 3000 guineas, but was never raced. He comes from a good family, being by Tetrarch—Good and Gay, by Bayardo—Popinjay (dam of Magpie) a half-sister to Popingaol, the dam of Mis. Gadabout, who is racing prominently for Lord Astor in England this season.

His Majesty the King was represented by a winner at the Ascot meeting last month in Aloysia, a two-year-old filly •L Le ™ b + e J.&- V ervaine. Appropriately enough this youngster won the Queen Mary Stakes of 3000 soys, five furlongs, for two-year-old fillies, and Their Majesties were there to see her score. It is stated that the daughter of Lemherg is a sensible filly with handsome frame and quality well stamped over her. Nothinjr was qvucker to find her running than Aloysia and she was clear of her rivals in the first furlong. She stalled off a detervrT d^ al , lenge h ? HH " A B* Khan's Moti Mahal and won gamely by a length. Aloysia is a grand-daughter of Vain ir, ,^ h Vr as the last hors e to win for the late K.ng Edward. Vain Air is the dam of Weathervane, who on the same thl p 8 Z Sl \ V n ' ran ""Placed in the Royal Hunt Cup, an event he anVoof tO /. m * Mfjeaty King George in 1923 and in which he finished second to Dinkie last year.

The winner of the Royal Hunt Cud at Ascot Cockpit, had for some time been regarded as a colt likely to carry off an important handicap. He was fancied for the City and Suburban, but he was the victim of circumstances in that race. Later he ran with some prominence ,n the "Jubilee," and finished second to Grand Joy-one of his Hunt Cup opponents-at Epsom; but, although backed he did not appeal to the general public to the same extent as sevlral of the others. Cockpit's owner," Mr. P JVelke, has been a keen supporter of racing for many years, but his most important successes apart from the latest win SSliwS** b / J he Blre of Cockpit; namely, China Cock, who had a peculiar penchant for Liverpool Cups, four of which he lifted in the course of his career.

*>ot all the jockeys who come from other parts of the world to seek fame and fortune in the Old Country live up to the reputations that precede them (says an English writer). But Frank Dempsey who came from Australia primarily to ride for Sir Charles Hyde, has already made it evident that he has little to learn in the art of horsemanship. Demn sey does not ride so frequentl/ as many other of Ins contemporaries; but he claims a fair percentage of winners. Per. haps his most impressive finishes so far were those on Paddy in the Newbury Cup and Hong-Kong at Epsom in June. It is rumoured that while all the touts and track-watchers were at the Port m tl^r 8 ' D en<*era was galloped at Morphettville, and the trial was a good one Dendera was taken to Murray Bridge, and looked all over a winner, When up flashed an outsider in Happy Link, and won on the post. Dendera is by that good sprinter Dcnacrc, and is bound to win races. Money simply pourdd in on him. Judging by Dendcra's form his party should not be long in getting their money back. * ,

Frank Dempsey has cabledi his relations that his injured leg is making splendid improvement and that he ha 3 been able to discard his crutches- Dempsey will leave Marseilles for Melbourne on November 28. He adds that he will be glad to be back in Australia. Mandelieu, the Ascot Stakes winner, 59 an old-fashioned cut of horse, and somewhat angular in conformation, with, a long, lean head, and broad in his hips. His tail is set on. higher than most horses (remarks a writer in "Sporting Life"). A lazy sort in his home gallops, he leaves his best work for the racecourse, and when Jort dropped away in the straight Mandelieu drew into his place behind Carbonaro, and putting in a game effort after leaving the spagnoletti board, he resisted the challenge of the unlucky Eastern Monarch, who has been second in four of his five races this season, including the Queen's Prize and the Babraham Stakes, the latter of which Mandelieu won. Lord Glanely and his trainer F. Barling must regard Ascot as their lucky meeting. It was in 1919 that Barling saddled no fewer than eight winners. Their renewed association with the fixture was attended by success, as Sunderland, their first runner, waa a ready winner of the Trial Stakes at the recent meeting, albeit he proved himself a bit of a handful for a light boy. He sprawled a little, and got off an even keel opposite the number board. Richards, however, is a muscular and strong boy for his weight, and he kept his mount well up to it to the end. Sunderland is a Sunstar colt without the least limber, and with the most intelligent of heads. Report had it that Barling had tried him well since lie had run so prominently for a little over a mile in the Derby. Carslake moved up on Zionist when the latter was contesting the Prince of Wales' Stakes-at Ascot last month by easy stages, and when Domehico wenl wide at the junction of the course Warminster took the rails with Zionist in close attendance. As he turned into tha line for home he had Domenico on his left, and the Wliatcombe horse was going by far the easiest of the three a furlong in the straight. Carslake let Zionist run along in his hands and take a slight lead from Warminster. In the last 150 yards Zionist swerved right away to the left, and for a fraction of a second he looked like going into the judge's box. Except for this dramatic swerve Zionist must have won. As it was it was only a neck verdict, and went against him. It,is a pity that such a good horse should have such a kink in him.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19250801.2.196

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume LVI, Issue 180, 1 August 1925

Word Count
1,602

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume LVI, Issue 180, 1 August 1925

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