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TURF NOTES.

(By "WHALEBONE.". . _ Concerning the success of Manna, ridden by S. Donoghue, in the Derby, an English writer says: M. M. de Hoz had won 17 races in France up to the end of May, and is credited with 757,320 francs, preceding Baron Rothschild, 713,271, and M. Macomber, 404,199. Lord Derby is credited with 41,892 francs won in three races. Green Star, who upset the presumed good thing, Shower of Gold, in the Juvenile Selling Plate at Epsom in May, is the first representative? of her 6ire, African Star, to see a racecourse. African Star stands at Major Holliday's stud in Ireland. The death has occurred in France at the age of 94 of M> V. Malappert, who was a successful breeder many years ago. He owned two brood mares which he sold in foal, and they produced Frontin and Little Duck, which won the Grand Prix in 1883 and ISB4. M. Malappert was the founder of the famous Champagne Saint Hilaire Stud, where Baron Maurice Rothschild now breeds with great success, and where the famous Sardanapale now stands. The question as to whether jockeys' "presents" should be included in their salaries was raised in Dublin recently, when M. A. Wing, appealed to the High Court against an assessment of f 1000 a year for the years 1922-23 and 1923-24. His contention was that presents received from ownerß after winning races for them should not be included, as his employment had then ceased. Counsel for Wing said that English jockeys were not taxed on their presents. The Income Tax Commissioner contended that the presents were part of the jockey*' emoluments. The further hearing was adjourned. The victory of Fairbank in the King's Plate at Toronto, last month, recalls one of the most memorable Derbies in the history of the race. The sire of Fairbank is Anmer, the colt that wa3 brought down by a suffragist in the year in which Craganour was first past the post, but was disqualified in favour of the 100 to 1 chance, Aboyeur. Anmer was bred and owned by His Majesty, who presented him to the Canadian Government, with the object of improving the breed of the light horse in the Dominion. After 'Manna had cantered home for the Derby, Steve Donoghue said that the race was run practically as he expected. According to Donoghue, Manna had the Bpeed to take a good place, and though he took up the running a little earlier than he had intended, he was ensured of a good position. Manna headed Dalmagarry as soon as the seven furlongs post was reached, and the Bon of Phalaris came round Tattenham Cornei very smoothly. Donoghue felt thai he had the race won the moment Manna turned into the straight, and, to us< the jockey' 3 own words, "it was th( easiest ride I have ever had in th< Derby." Regarding the Derby, the special commissioner of "The London Sportman" says: —"It was apparent at first glance that Donoghue had won his race on Manna, and he came along up the straight like a hare before a lot of terriers. Whether Donoghue ever took a pull at his mount earlier on I cannot say, but it seems hardly possible, or how could he have been where he was at Tattenham Corner? The supposed non-stayer was certainly allowed to string his field out from that point home, and I never saw a Derby won more easily. The only opponent to make any sort of a show against tee winner was Zionist, who easily reversed earlier running with all but Manna. No doubt the soft going favoured him, and we probably saw him at his best. He, Cross Bow, and Manna were drawn side by side in the centre of the course, hut what happened to the Manton favourite in the race I know not. The Sirdar, who finished third, is a French-bred colt by McKinley, who was out of my old gift mare (from Sir John Thursby) Mrs. Despard (dam of Zori de Zi). He must be pretty useful, but, really, the winner squandered his field in eucb style that many mus* have been easing up. I think Fred 1 ling has -now achieved a record which is never likely to be equalled. There is nothing very extraordinary in selecting some of the very best yearlings at .Doncaster, and buying them, if you have a big enough commission; but here was a case in which the Beckhampton trainer was instructed by cable from China to buy the best yearling at Doncaster in 1923—and he had to buy only one. The upshot of this was that he bought Manna, whom he has also trained to win the Two Thousand and Derby, and already it looks as though the St. Leger will follow almost as a matter of course." "Augur," of "Sporting Life," is a great ; admirer of Saucy Sue. Regarding her ■ run in the Oaks, he says: "Saucy Sue I went round Tattenham nCorner a little' wide, which is to be accounted for by the fact that her bit slipped, and to that may also be attributed the circumstancV; 1 that she pitched a little in the straight. She nevertheless won on a checked rein, j She would have even put on another few lengths had she been asked. I quite i expected that odds of five or six to one I would have been asked by the ring, for although showing more daylight under her than might qualify her to be considered adapted to parts of the covtree, she stormed the rest on the score of looks, and was as cool and collected as could be. In the race she was pulling . hard to the hill top, and it was as Miss | Gadabout drew into second place thereabouts that Bullock allowed the favourits to have a little more of her own way, with the result that she took the lead without effort and as easily kept it. I think she will be a still better filly in the autumn. A first impression that she is yet spiry is to be corrected on closer acquaintance, and although she will always have a greyhoundish appearance and might girth a "trifle better, she has immense power, and a reach that will never probably be shown to such advantage as on a course where she can lay herself down to galloping every yard of it. On that account 1 am a great believer in her St. Leger chance, even against a perfectly trained Picaroon, and although on a track like Epsom, Manna, which is as handy at the turns as is a cooper round a barrel, ! would poach something here and there, ! and probably stretch her at the present time*, I fancy she will give him short [ shrift at Doncaater," ' ~ >"

Iv. Godby, who is a son of an Australian trainer, rode a good race on Honour filly at Epsom recently. The young jockey went to England at .the same time as Dempsey, who was the rider of the second horse, Shower of Gold, in the Mickleham Selling Plate at the same meeting. It was Godby*s second success in the saddle, as he has ridden one winner in Australia. Dempsey, the Australian jockey, had his first experience of Epsom on May 25, and he celebrated the occasion by riding the winner of the final event, Hong-Kong. Dempsey was seen at his best on this horse, which is very handy round turns, and he had the prize in his pocket, so to speak, as soon as the straight was reached. Dempsey had just previously been narrowly beateu on Mother's Son in the Epsom Handicap, which nine out of every ten thought he had won. , Shower of Gold has now run five times, on four consecutive occasions finishing second (says "London Sporting Life"). The filly appears to be deficient in the necessary stamina even to 6tay five furlongs, as she has conveyed the impression of stopping more than once. She might, however, have scored her first success in the Mickleham Selling Plate at Epsom recently but for the breakaway in which several of the contestants, including Lord Londonderry's representative, covered most of the course. For a few- days there was something of a mystery in connection with the purchase for Australia of the English horse Drake (remarks an Australian writer). Originally it was stated that Mr. Eric Connolly had given more than 8000gs for Drake. Another cable said that Mr. W. C. Douglas, of Sydney, has purchased the horse for 5500g5. But the Melbourne sportsman who races as Mr. "S. A. Rawdon" declared that he held an option of purchase over Drake, which included a veterinary examination, after the horse had competed at Ascot last week. Drake won the All Aged Stakes at Ascot. At last word has been received that Mr. C. C. Edmonds, the Engliah agent fo: Messrs. Adamson, Mackinnon, and Cox, iiad secured the horse for Mr. "Rawdon" after he had come through the examination sucessfully. Drake will leave for Australia on July 9. The price paid for Drake has not been disclosed, but it probably is a little more than SOOOgs. Drake is a five-year-old horse by Sir Eager from Lady Burghley, by St. Serf from Perugia, by Orvieto from Lady Cecil ,by Ossian. As a two-year-old he won nearly £10,000 in stakes. He was successful in three races last season, while as a three-year-old he finished second in the Newmarket Challenge Stakes. The All Aged Stakes, which he won recently, was over a six furlongs course. At a three-year-old Drake was favourite for the Two Thousand Guineas, btit went amiss, and did not start. Mr. "Rawdon" purchased Drake principally for use at the stud, but he stated recently that if the horse landed in good condition he might consider the question of giving him a race or two. Drake will join Lanius at the Toolamba stud, in the Goulburn Valley.

"The race once more Tevealed what a genius Donoghue is on the course, and we do not say that merely to reiterate a stock phrase. The little man has an uncanny gift, too, in choosing the right mount. He is wise to be a free lance so far as the Derby is concerned. Doubtless he is already looking at every two-year-old of promise now running and wondering whether it will suit him to be in the saddle at Epsom in 1926! He ' has now beaten Archer's record and in a more competitive age — not as regards jockeyship altogether, but so far as the chief 6tables are concerned. Weston was criticised when he won on Sansovino last year by dashing the colt to the front coming down the hill and putting up a gap which none of his rivals could lessen. Well, Donoghue did likewise, and it will be a source of study in tactics for other Derby jockeys. Of course, the horse in question must have the speed and the requisite stamina, and we cannot visualise a more appropriate mount for Donoghue than Manna was. A little man in complete affinity with an equally dashing and nimble horse."

Thousands of people are wondering what it costs to win the Derby and what that win is worth, says a trainer in the "Daily Mail." The answer is that it may cost anything from £2000 to £100,000. The Duke of Westminster only paid about £1000 for Flying Fox, which won the Derby itf 1599 and the Two Thousand Guineas and St. Leger as well, winning over £40,000 in prizes. He wa3 sold afterwards for over £39,000. Lord Glanely, on the other hand, who won with Grand Parade in 1919, must have i spent more than £100,000 in attempts to ■carry off the prize. Several times the ! race has been won by inexpensive and J little-fancied horses, the "second string" jof their stable. Few people realise what it means "£ s d" to an owner to win i the Derby, quite apart from the honour land glory. To all intents and purposes |to win "the Derby is the finish of a I horse's racing career, but his real value !to his owner has only just begun. WinIners of the big races, such as the Derby, the Two Thousand Guineas, and the St. ; Leger, are rarely more than three year 3 !on the turf, as the value of the horses is much greater at the stud than the stakes they could possibly win at racing. The TetraVch, for whom a stud fee of 500 guineas is charged, must have earned more than £100,000 for his fortunate I owner. The record is probably held by j St. Simon. The Duke of Portland gave only 1600 guineas for him as a two-year-old" and on the racecourse he was never beaten. He was undoubtedly the greatest sire of his age. Making allowance for the Duke of Portland's own mares which were mated with him, St. Simon's earnings during his 22 years as a stallion must have amounted to close on £250,000,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19250718.2.185.9

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume LVI, Issue 168, 18 July 1925

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2,169

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume LVI, Issue 168, 18 July 1925

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