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TURF NOTES.

; | (By "WHALEBONE.") j Mr. W. 11. Mackay, the owner of, | Beauford. has a promising rising four-1 ; year-old. half-brother to the crack gal-! i lope,- in Anambab. The latter is 'l.v ! ! Magpie-, anil big things arc expected of him. alais is assured of the premier position amongst the sires in the Commonwealth. l"p to April 30 his stock had i won £34.071) in stakes. Absurd being 'next with £2(i.S7lj, then cumin; The ■ Welkin £20,ni).1. I At Lexington. I'.S.A.. recently. Air. Jos. : ! Widener purchased Fairpl.iy. a 20-year-, ; old stallion and sire of Man-'o-War. in 'the great Rcimemt stable sale for £20.000. 1 Another game buyer in Mr. Charles 1 .ferryman paid £8000 for Donna Roe-ii, byRook Sand. 'Ibis is an American record price for a brood marc with a cult at j ber side. \ j Y.iiais is assured of the premier position amongst the sires in the ComI nionwealtli (says an exchange). Ip to April .'lOtli his" stuck had won £:.4,(i7!) in stakes, Absurd being next with i £23.870, then coming The Welkin i'21).!)!i.1. If all Absurds winners in New i Zealand were added to the Australian I total he would surpass Yulais. As his |£21i,570 possibly includes some or all of | the big races of New Zealand, it would be [difficult to arrive .-it his exact total for j both Australia and New Zealand. t j Although a forfeit was due for the I Derby, which was decided at Epsom em .May 27 last, by the last Tuesday in! .March, the list of horses left in was" not! I announced until yesterday, when a 1 I special issue of the •'Calendar" was issued. Of the 328 entries, So" horses ' are left in the premier classic, and the ! lvalue of the race wil be £11.223 to the 1 ! winner, this sum including £500 for the ' breeder of the winner. 'The richest .Derby on roe-, was that of last year, j I Snnsovino crediting Lord Derby with I £11,73... " I Some horses that have won impor- j taut races arc treasured by their owners and allowed to run in the paddock for the rest of their lives; others are sold to the ponies or the country, and when their days of usefulness there have ended they drift to the shafts of a cab or baker's cart. Two that have begun to tread the downward path are The Epicure and Prince Charles. It seems only the other day that they j respectively won the Doncaster and I Sydney Cup. and less than 12 months , ago Prince Charles won a good race at Kandwick, and was a favourite for the I Metropolitan. Itecr-ntlv the Prince was | | the outsider in a field" of three at the I ! Armidale Hospital Meeting, and he fin- j , ished second. He. had filled the same | 1 position in a previous race, for which jhe started second favourite, but The j Epicure was not equal to gaining a I ; place in the principal handicap of the afternoon. Mr. Hubert L. Barry, of .Sydney, who i has just returned from a trip to Ame- I | rica, gives interesting figures of prize- I j money provided by the Turf centres for I I the coming season. It will break all j , records, the previous high mark bavin" I j been attained last year, when the rich International Stakes made th- t& , al I pur-e distribution for the 12 months' a I trifle less than £2,000.000. This year it will reach the- £2.400.000 mark. He -ays the return to the Chicago district, with- i I out taking from the prominence of the I I sport in the other rich centres, will be | responsible for a big part of the increase I over last year. The Aurora, 111., track will provide .7 clays of racing, which will bring the Chicago district total to I • just uuut-r £1.000,000. It j, expert-.. \ l '"- a " international programme will I j shortly be ]~, ,-,„.! ~,[ oil _ (,p,-, ( , , t ],, I I loan las, year, when £100,000 °wa, given I away ... the three Epinar.l contests are , adv' , in;' k in: rS .. a -" '""' i;; " r >' ■»>'«'. \Z---1 making l " appearance in the j tae.iig nd 0 i , ll,c game, "no the breeding : l.'.uo'ta of ."'is "' 0!1 he ■"mct'na its: ),ou of folks new to the sport. ; . r 'n the arrival of George oun .- ;„ ' f.«lney he had something to say " -,'! ' I interviewers concerning the ra J hp |tween Gloaming and The Hawk- "LV |to the day of the race I thought .' ' ..hi be a soft thing lor 10 old7io.se ; i but Cameron was so confident of sue j 1 cess, and the support for The Hawk was ' ,so strong that I began to think l' ! would not have things all mv own wav i and prepared myself for all 'omprT ' :... fl,c race. j "'""' the old horse „ as . never better. and expected him to win , I but I rode him to the best of mv ability all the time. J j, IPt ~t ~i m fr)]o •_. , ;me i.awk on hi-- quarter to make the 1 ; leader extend himself, an .| then I jlld-'ed I 'bow my mount was going, and I knew ! ; his capability for a final run. When l the turn (about two furlongs from 'homo, was reached I knew The Hawk , was all out. nd mv mount, was "eiinc j well within himself. After (hat the i race was easy, and I won comfortably • Ihe turner had .i good time, as after the race people bought the nails which wee in Gloaming's plates. end gave as • mue-.i as five shillings apiece. Others ;in the adjoining stalls r-.ilj.-d hfirs out 'if Gloaming's tail to keep as memen--1 toes." . Mr. "J. Baron" has broken out. in a ! new place .write, '"Poseidon" in the fydii-v "-.it,",. For ear.. he lias esia'di-hod. if not actually graced, the • list of Turf nomenclatures with a mixed '■ j medley of Princes and Princesses. Dukes ■and Duchesses, most of them named i after various friends or employees mi-' ; known to the world of racing. But i Prince Foote is dead. <o there are to be !no more Prince... while Duke Foote his boon given to Mr. W. Longworth. and there will not be any more Dukes., There are still a few ' this year, but' most of the Wills Gully yearlings which have Sad to be named are by either, Wallace* Isinglass or Richmond Main. Mr. "Baron." who. of course, is king of his own nomenclature, has registered 2S names 0 f yearlings. These, if more prosaic than of yore, certainly indicate their percentage on the sire's "side, even ' one pair that are named after two famous English cricketers. Following '■ is the complete list.- Hobbs Glass Gil- ; ligan Glass. Poor Glass. Glass Window ', Special Glass, Yellow Class. Pink r;i aS s' Orantre Glass, Duchess Athole, Dueling' Hazel. Matts Glass. Stewart Glass Soutar's Glass, Wallace Buckland' Dandy Wallace. Wallace Marine. Wallace Mago, Agnes Richmond, Sweet. Richmond, Adelaide Richmond. Holer, Richmond, Sanely Richmond. Richmond Colours. George Richmond. fluke Sandy. Duke Italy, Cherry Dike, Huge • Yividis.

I It is said that one reason why Steve ! Donoghuo does so well at Epsom is that ! while some jockeys evince an inclinai lion to steady their mounts at the. sharp I descent entering the straight, he goes j straight on, thereby gaining an ad van , ii"c. Kpsom is a peculiar course, but i Manna is a type of cult that it suits. ■He i- compact and not too big. ! Rminymedc not' only recorded tbe King's first success of the season when ho ' carried top weight to victory in th« Brandon Three-Year-Old Handicap at Newmarket, in April, but gave W. .Tarvis his first training success since he was installed at l.gortun House, tho son of Hurry On ran very kindly in -Joe Chillis' hands, .and had' his rivals in : trouble a long way from home. ! The once-famous English jockey, Charles Maidment. who celebrated his Hist birthday in April, lives at New market, where fur years after he gave up being a jockey the old fellow used to ride at exercise on the Heath (says '•Horse ami Hound'). Known as '"lucky" in his palmy days. Maidment in 1871 tied with the celebrated George Fordham for the jockey premiership, each of them riding Sri winners, and that year Maidment rede Baron Meyer de Rothschild's Hannah to victory in One Thousand, Oaks, and -St. Leper. The folowing season he again secured the great Doncaster event on Lord Wilton's Wenlock, hawing earlier in the year ridden that great horse Cremorne to narrow- victory in the Derby for his first master, Mr. Henry Savile. In 187G Maidment won , his .second Derby upon another racer of high merit, Air. A. Bettazzi's Kisber, but he was never provident, and is now, alas, very poor. I .Mr. Sol Joel, in conjunction with j several other English racing men, has I taken over the Laurel Park Stud in i America (-ays an exchange). The mill port.ation of first-class bloodstock from ] England will bo continued, and it is the I intention of the company to make trial shipments of thoroughbreds from Ampi rica to Australia and New Zealand. I Whether the market will prove satisfacI tory is doubtful. We breed a tremenj clous number of thoroughbred., in Ausi tralia (says the "Referee"), and when fresh blood is needed at any stud, our breeders like to trade directly with England. No doubt they would continue to adhere to that plan, even though the American-bred importations traced to some of England's best lines. Mr. I. H. Whoatfroft brought numerous mares, some young stock, and a few stallions, from America to Sydney a few years ago. but it cannot be said the shipment greatly benefited this country's bloodstock. After certain past winters some ol the Manton horses have come out early lin the season a little backward in their j coats. No so this spring (says an Eng- | lish writer on April IS). No horses I could have looked better than Caravel I did at the recent Derby meeting or than I Picaroon when saddled for the Crave.. j Stakes at Newmarket yesterday. Mr. ('ox's colt carried a rare polish, and pleased paddock critics by his general I iicalthy appearance. When coming out ■ e;f his clothes he carried himself splendidly. His hocks may be a little roii,i;ii, j while he turns both his toes in. If this i habit does not bring about an undue i strain upon his tendons and he goes lit i and well to the post for the Derby, he | will be a good favourite after his brilj liant victory yesterday. He commanded his rivals for speed everywhere, and was pulling over them all the war. ' Bullock found his mount going ='> I smoothly at the top of Bushes Hill that he glanced hastily to the left and right to sec where danger was likely to come from. Picaroon can lie still further improved. (Picaroon subsequently went lame, and had to be scratched for the i Derby).

I . ' In England, hunlle-iacing doc; not appear to affect horses' p-je-c as much as in Australia (ni'ys an exchange!. A few- weeks prior to winning the recent Liverpool Cup, one: mile and a-ejuarter and 70 yards, and Newbury < up, one mile, Paildy won over tin- hurdles; and I notice that Noce d" Argent, who failed on March 21 in the big hurdle race, the Impel Cup (San.!..-.-, .. for which he started favourite, distinguished himself on the flat on April 0. "lie started at remunerative odds for the Nottingham Spring Handicap, one mile and a-quarter, in which he had Tst 101b, and won by a neck from the Tracery horse. Obliterate, who started favourite. Note d'Argent is trained by S. Wootton for Mr. S. Cohen. I Among the features of tbe Newmarket (.'raven meeting just closed, was the performance of Zionist in the Spring Three-Year-Old Stakes (says the special commissioner of "Sporting Life"). This was such as to entitle him to rank in the very highest class, especially as a stayer. I have always maintained that , his running at Hurst Park last autumn should be completely disregarded, though it may be that Diomedes would always , ''chop" him for speed over sprinting distane-es. On that occasion, however, he never got going at. nil. and was b»_ton in the first ' furlong. Zionist hi be barely 1...3 hands, but. he is a very lengthy colt, with fin-, far-reaching 'shoulders, and <>\iito remarkable s.-..j-i behind the saddle, I am satisfied that 'be will be right upsides »ith I be best 'of them in the Two Thousand (iuineas, ,if he does not actually eiin. It is •■•■ry strange that the st-,. k of Spearmint should haw. so greatly improved in tho : later day, of the: old horse. The earlier stock was nothing like so good and trustworthy-, and there was a time when trainers fought shy of them. Now that we have seen such as Spin:. hop. Poisoned Arrow-, and Zioniitt. it is a very different mutter, but Spenrniinl is cloud, and so ■the- discussion passes to the academic 'stage.

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Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume LVI, Issue 132, 6 June 1925

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2,171

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume LVI, Issue 132, 6 June 1925

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