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TURF NOTES.

(3y WHALEBONE.)

In a race at Kempton Park, Equator was weighted a stone less than he should have carried, and duly won. The "London Sportsman" says it was so obvious that a mistake had been made in the handicapping of Equator with Merriment ! and Pomanuer that the sequel caused no ' surprise. Maj. Lee informed the stew- I ards that he had inadvertently put the I figure 7 instead of 8 in his stones column, ■ and so frank an explanation was of j course accepted without question. It was only by most judicious handling I that Elliott was able to secure a necK \ verdict on Plaek over Neigeuse in the j Newmarket Oaks last month. Lord J Rosebery's filly was meeting her rivals j on a stone worse terms than in the l fillies' classic at Epsom. Halfway up j the hill, Xeigeuse was going the better '■ of the pair, and they raced head and head until within a few yards of the winning post, when Elliott brought his whip out in his right hand, and a couple of taps enabled X'lack to just pull the race I out of tho fire. An old-timer remarked afterwards that Elliott's effort was j worthy of George Fordham. i The Cesarewitch, which was run at Newmarket on October 15, was inaugu- i rated two years after the accession of I Queen Victoria, in which season the | Cambridgeshire was established. The I long-distance event has had an uninterrupted career, but the Cambridgeshire was abandoned four years ago owiug to labour troubles. The Cesarewitch has | been won by many high-class horses, in I addition to comparative mediocrities. | Robert the Devil, Corrie Roy, St. Gatien,! Sheen, and Willonyx can fairly be in- j eluded in the former category. ln bygone years large fortunes were won and | lost over the race; but the wagering is; on a far more modest scale nowadays, j though even so a large sum is at stake I in the bulk. Prince Palatine, a stallion belonging to Mr. E. T. Simms, and said to be wortu 250,000 dollars, was burned to death on : October 13 at Texington, Kentucky. Prince Palatine was by Persimmon out of Lady Lightfoot, and was bred in 1908 j by Lord Wavertree (then Mr. W. Hall AValker). He was sold privately to.Mr. | F. Pilkington, for whom he won several I races. Prince Palatine did not, however, | reach his best until his second season, j during which he won, among other races, | the St. Leger, in which he easily beat j Lycaon, King William, and others. As I a four-year-old he enhanced his reputa-1 tion by carding off the Ascot Gold Cup, i the Eclipse Stakes, the Doncaster Cup, the Jockey Club Stakes, while as a five-year-old he won the Coronation Cup and the Gold Cup for the second time. In ; all he won over £36,000. After an unexpected failure in the Goodwood Cup I he was bought by Mr. J. B. Joel for ! 40,00050v5., and for some time stood at; the Childwick Stud, later being shipped ; to America- Prince Palatine was the sire of, among many other winners, j Rose Prince, one of the runners in a recent Cesarewitch. Picaroon came out as the great two-year-old winner at Kempton, and he may be very good indeed, though we j must wait till after the Middle Park I Plate to be sure on that point (says the special commissioner of the '"London Sportsman"). It is wonderful what an affinity has discovered itself between the two lines of blood which the late Mr. "Fairie" Cox exploited with such success, and Beppo, more especially with No. 1 blood intervening. Picaroon is by Beppo out of Ciceronetta (1916), 10, by Cicero (1), her dam Silesia, by Spearmint (1) out of Galicia (dam of Bayardo, etc.). Out of Silesia herself Beppo got My Dear. On the other hand, when Beppo was mated with Galeottia, i Mr. Cox's great No. 1 line of blood, they produced Gay Laura, whose first foal was Gay Crusader, by Bayardo (son of Galicia). Picaroon, it should be noted, is the first foal of Ciceronetta. There must be something more than luck in the results of these combinations with Beppo. It will not, however, _Tter the fact that the combinations with Beppo, to which I refer, have been wonderfully successful. In short, it is not too much to say that Beppo, properly mated, is one of the best stallions in England. Mr. George Lambton has very rarely failed to buy the best yearlings for the Aga Khan, but among them they made one mistake in not securing Papyrus at Doncaster (says the special commissioner of the London "Sportsman"). It was a mistake that I should not have made, for I had previously written ot the colt that I 'believed he would win the Derby, but I believe they thought him rather on tbe small side, which, no doubt, he is, but Papyrus is indeed a multum in parvo. That same year I had written in almost equally high terms of Teresina, who was the undoubted 'best of the Sledmere yearlings, and now I am thankful to have lived to see them fight out such a glorious finish in the Jockey Club Stakes last month. To say that the filly "outstayed" the colt is an incorrect description. They both stayed equally well, | and it was the weight alone that decided j the issue. I doubt not that Mr. Hornung is almost as well satisfied as if Pap\" j rus had won, for no one can ever again i dispute the class and sterling merit of j his colt, whose subscription list for the! next season will not be long in filling, I if it is not already full. Subscriptions were booked some time ago at 400gs. fee conditionally on mares proving in jfoal, but there is now, I believe, an alter-' j native offer to book them at 300gs. | unconditionally. It will be well to ■ I select mares of good size and substance! | for Papyrus—daughters of Swynford, ] I for instance, or Sundridge. Tranquil j j would exactly suit him, and I hope that j they may be mated in due time, though I perhaps not the first season. I perjsonally have a fine, strong Prince Palae tine mare, in foal to Monarch. She will, I think, suit Papyrus well and recall recollections of Prince Palatine's second Ascot Cup, when Tracery, who looked like winning, was knocked over. Lady Josephine and her daughter, Mumtaz Mahal, would be ideal mates for Papyrus, and there is a tendency on the ; dam's side of Papyrus to lack size. Thus ' Flamboyant, his three-parts brother, is ' a small horse, though a very good one. Comus, too, is a little one. Papyrus himself is just big enough, and if he can be so mated as to get stock bigger than himself and of equal class and quality ,he will indeed prove a worthy successor ito Tracery.

Manacre, who was bought privately by his owner, Mr. E. H. Clyde, is proving a highly profitable two-year-old. He has won three races and finished second in another which makes his total stake money £3469 so far this season. He was first in the Maribyrnong Trial Stakes, the Maribyrnong Plate, and the Flemin"ton Stakes. ° Owing to blood poisoning in the ri<»ht knee, B. Carslake had to take a rest from riding in England at the comImencement of last month. The trouble | was aggravated through Carslake [taking off Sib—he got down to 8.4—t0 Brownhylda in the Newbury ; Autumn Cup. Success did not attend ; Carslake, wasting, as Brownhylda wat unplaced. It was regrettable that the wet day j should have caused Gloaming to be -scratched for the Linlithgow Stakea | (says Pilot). Opinions are still divided as to what would have been the result iof a meeting between The Night Patrol iand Gloaming on a fine day, but I now incline to the belief that the latter would have won. Tlie Night Patrol's best chance of defeating Gloaming might have deDended unon getting a substantial lead" in the "first half-mile, but as he may not have been ridden in that fashion, it is probable Gloaming would have been within striking distance of him coming to the turn, and, going on what I have seen of the two, the New Zealander is the better finisher. For the year ending July 31 last tho unclaimed totalisator dividends at Randwick aggregated £1100, and this amount was allocated to charitable institutions. It is remarkable that so many people as represented by that amount should be forgetful, and it makes one wonder whether the books are equally fortunate. The chances are, though, that peoplewho bet straight-out. are not as forgetful as those who are betting on three chances in a race. A second or a third may be ; overlooked, but the winner very rarely, and it might be safe to bet that most; of the unclaimed totalisator money was the result of the investor's carelessness in connection with minor placings. A proposal for a series of four international horse races in 1925, two to be run in Kentucky and two in New York, has been laid before Mr. August Belmont, [ chairman of the Jockey Club, by Mr. j Matt J. Winn, general manager of the I Kentucky Jockey Club. The proposal j involves an aggregate purse of 200,000 | dollars for the series, for which the best i of Europe's thoroughbreds would be inj vited to compete with American horses. I The races would be run at progressive | distances, such as prevailed in this year's j international specials. The first would be at a mile, the second at a mile and a furlong, the third at a mile and a quarter and the last at a mile and a half. The postponement of the Cambridgeshire recently owing to the British elections, is not a unique circumstance, though the present will be the first ■ occasion on which it has been due to | anything of a political nature, says j "Sporting Life." The older generation |of racegoers will readily recall Hack- ' ness' year. In this instance < the field :of thirty-one had weighed out and proceeded to the post. In the meanwhile, however, the clerk of the weather had produced a hurricane, accompanied by heavy rain. As a consequence the i horses did not come under the starter's ! orders, and the race was postponed until the following day. Four years ago we were deprived of a Cambridgeshire on any day, but this was on account cf the coal strike being in progress. Neither the politicians nor the weather could be blamed for tha scrapping of the popular handicap. Recently representatives of the .Trotting, Breeders and Owners' Association in Victoria waited on the AttorneyGeneral to protest against a proposed amendment to the Police Offiences Act, which would prohibit the use of a tight head reign or other contrivance for the purpose of causing a horse to move, with his head elevated in an artificial or unnatural manner. Members of the deputation stressed the fact that an- overhead check rein was necessary to give high-class horses their proper' gait. It was also required in training military and 6how animals, and there was no cruelty at all. The rein assisted the muscles of the horse, and was needed for the animal's education. If the animals' heads were kept in proper position there would be fewer broken knees. The Attorney-General pointed out that the proposed amendment exempted trotting races. Whether the sentiment was ill-founded or not, some members of the community were against the use of the overhead "or tight check rein. He had always thought that a measure of cruelty was inflicted by the unnatural raising of a horse's head, particularly after a long journey. He would discuss the matter with other horsemen, and carry the deputation's representations to the Cabinet before the bill reached the committee stage in Parliament. Epinard, the lamous French colt, fulfilled the last of his three engagements against American "cracks" at Latonia on October 11. In the two previous races Epinard was beaten into second place, first by Wise Counsellor, and then by Ladkin. Neither of his conquerors figured in the field. The course presented a picturesque scene (says a mesI sage to a London paper), 50,000 people j being present when the first race was i run. Everyone was on the tiptoe of ! excitement over the French colt's ! chances, and from the general tone of I the conversation it was obious that his ! success would be welcomed. With Zev | and Wise Counsellor out, the race was a I very open one- Sarazen held pride of j place in the early course betting. Tho only filly to be saddled was Princess I Doree,. Epinard, who looked fit and ! well, drew the inside berth, and this j gave his supporters further cause for i optimism. The result was as follows: '. Sarazen 1, Epinard 2, Mad Play 3. Sarai zen, the favourite, in the fine time of 1.20 4-03, beat Epinard by a length. Mad Play came third. Chilhowee led ;at the quarter and half mile, but was ' compelled to fall behind Sarazen and Mad Play at the six furlongs. Epinard crept up to third place at the mile, ! forcing Chilhowee out of the running, : and leaving the race to Sarazen and Mad Play. In the last quarter-mile the French horse ajtain showed that lie was no quitter, and in the last few yards he made a most desperate effort to overtake the winner. Although Sarazen scored a wonderful victory, Epinard was just as wonderful in defeat, racinz after Parazen, and gaining stride bystride. At the winning post, however, amid a deafening roar of cheers, the American colt forged ahead, and Epinard I had to put up with second place.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19241129.2.164.7

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume LV, Issue 284, 29 November 1924

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2,298

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume LV, Issue 284, 29 November 1924

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