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TURF NOTES.

(By WHALEBONE.)

Lord Deriiy's jockey. Quirke, riding Mr. Macomber'a Star Flash, was kicked by another horse at the, starting-post for the Prix ile Collcville at St. Cloud last month (says "The Sportsman"). Quirke sustained fracture uf the fibula, and was taken to the Jockeys' 110-pital at Chanlilly. Star Flash's"auouliler "as injured. Additional entries for the Melbourne Cup arc Avonms. from Western Australia, and Cold Steel. Highland. Nigger Minstrel, and Phoenix Park, from New Zealand, while Spearfell and Silver San were omitted from the list of Melbourne entries (says the "Australasian") The nominations for the Cup number 349, which is :">(> in excess of the previous record established last .year. Sands of the Orient, who was once owned by Mr D U Seaton. and is no" , standing at Bandon Grove, in Central Queensland, lias been well represented by winners recently, say- iin Australian writer. Red Sands, Lord Satin. Orient Dove. Orient Maid, ami Sanolean have each won two races in the various States, while Kastern star and Wise Sands have ako credited that sire with a '.vin. The A.J.C. Derby colt?. Golden Voice and Loquat, were to have commence 1 work recently under James Burden's care. Both have done well during their spell, says "Cardigan," and it looks as if they will play a prominent part in the decision of the big three-year-eld races. Golden Voice has apparently quite recovered fruni the illness that prevented him running at the autumn meeting, and his record reads two starts fur a win and a second. Mr. Charles Bower Ismay is lying at his Northamptonshire home in a serious condition, suffering from sleepy sickness (encephalitis lethargica), says the London "Sportsman" of May 20. Mr. Ismay is fifty, and is a prominent owner. He was owner of Craiganour, who finished first in the Derby, but was disqualified and the race awarded to Aboweur, a decision which caused a great sensation at the time. The disqualified horse started favourite, and after the race was sold for £30,000 and went to the Argentine. Lord Ttosebery (says the "Sporting Times") could not watch Plack win him his third One Thousand Guinea?, but he 'bucked up sufficiently to celebrate at hie beloved Epsom his seventy-seventh birthday, taking part in several little local ceremonies, which included a firework effigy of Plack, who certainly proved the reverse of a damp squib. Lord Dalmeny did the necessary at Newmarket. The son takes a more professional interest in raeinz than ever bis renowned father did—although winning the Derby was one of Lord Rosebery's successful ambitions in life.

It is only a few seasons since Elijah Wheatley, the English jockey, created a record which still remain-, of 125 winners and heading the list of successful jockeys while an apprentice. Since the war Wheatley has had a lean time, and his past exploits would seem to have been almost forgotten. Having given up his residence at Newmarket , . Wheatley has returned North, where there is a dearth ot lir=t-class riders. Donoghue's continued popularity was evinced at Chester by the reception which greeted him on riding the winners of the first and last races, the Lineage filly and Orion, both' two-year-olds, ~by the way. In neither case was the winner favourite, and. in fact, not a single favourite scored throughout the afternoon. The Lineage filly beat a very strong favourite in Miss Yolta. who, as usual, displayed immense in.tial speed, but, as so many have done during the week, collapsed on reaching the straight. In Orion's race another favourite Glittering, was well away nnd led, but began to drop out before reaching the straight. ° The Scurry Stakes, introduced for the first time last year, proved such a success that the event will be repeated during the International Horse Show to be held at Ulympia this month. In addition to LSI) in cash prizes the winner will hold a sold challenge cup presented by the lion. lWman Wanamaker, of New York. The Scurry Stakes may be described as a steeplechase indoors, with no jump over 4ft Ciin m height. The object is to jump round the Ulympia coiiWe in the least possible time, and every fault made adds a second to the time." In this class no competitor niav ride more than one horse. Regarding the visit of Kpinard to the j States this yea. , , complete agreement has! been reached (says Reuter) between M.! Wertheiiner ai:d ilaj iSelmont, Mr. J.I Slk-vliii unci M,. M .1. Wiiiii. tin: representatives of the three courses over which tlie r'ri-m-h cult uill U- iiigujrod. ;i > to the conditions of the races. All three! events in wind. Ejiinard will run will be I fur thivc-vcar-ui.U nnd upwards at weight-fur-age. The lirst, ai Belmont Park, and the second al Aqueduct, both in the. New York district, in September, j will each carry an added value oi l'~>."<>•' dollars. The Belmont Park race will be I a six furlong one, and the one at Aque-' duct a mile. The final race at Latonia : (Kentuckjyl will be a niile and a-quarter, ' and will have an added value of 50.000 dollars. At M. Wertheimer's request the closing dale for the rar-rs was fixed at July l.~>. Epinard will begin training in America in charge uf Leigh before that ; date.

' The Aga Khan's Pot au Feu, by Bruleur- Polly Peachum. ridden by <*■ Garner, won "the Brussels Grand Prize last month. The ex-New Zealand trainer, D. J. Prico. who has resided in Melbourne for a number of years, has been doing well with his team' lately. He won the chiet event at Moonee Valley on May 31 with Intriguer, a four-year-old gelding by Charlemagne IT. A few days later, at j the Victoria Racing Club's Birthday. meeting, he won the Marlborough Hurdle Handicap with Kahda. Though he had not raced for more than a year, Rahda was strongly fancied by followers of I Trice's stable. He gave a fine exhibi- | tion of jumping and now he U strongly I fancied for -the Victoria Grand National Hurdle Handicap. The Apa Khan, who scored his first classic triumph when Diophon carried. !off the Two Thousand Guineas, is a {comparatively recent acquisition to English racing; but. having decided to join 'the ranks of owners, he spared no exipense in the endeavour to procure the Ichoioest of bloodstock, and lie has alrjady expended what would represent a ;considerable fortune at the sales (rei marks an English exchange). Diophon ;was a wonderfully cheap purchase as \ things have turned out, as" he cost no .more than 40011 guineas as a yearling, land has won live races, worth in the bulk more than £18,000. The Aga ;Khan is also the owner of Mumtaz Mahal. Stockwcll was 20 years old when ha begat Doncaster; Hampton was 20 when jhc sired Bay Ronald; Wisdom was 19 j when he sired that good horse Love j Wisely, the sire of Prudent King; Musket was 17 when he got Carbine, which was the same age when he got his best son, Spearmint, says "Cardigan". When Toxophilite got Musket he was 11. St. Simon wae 22 when he got Charlemagne It., and that horse was a most successful sire, both in Australia and New Zealand. Charlemagne was only six when he got his best galloper, Carlita. Grafton's sire, Galopin, was 21 when he was got. Wallace was 19 when he got those great gallopers Patrobas and Wallace Isinglass, and the latter is now a successful sire. Professional backers go grey-headed in an endeavour to fathom Manton stable secrets, and the estimable "travelling man"—Joe Lawson—must have an awkward time being polite to "pro" toutera (remarks a London writer). The man behind the trainer in so many stables is as often as not the real guiding genius of the establishment. Some trainers (whose names are household words) might not last five minutes if they had not their able and trusted henchmen to fall back on. These henchmen do not get their photos in the picture papersi and do not write their reminiscences, but even the horses in the yard know who is the real boss. Yet some of the • best head lads have been marked failures when they have struck out on their own account. There is more to manage in a fashionable stable than four-foted, thoroughbreds which cannot talk. There is a prejudice against horses' running over the Rowley Mile that are drawn on the extreme outside, as Diophon was in the Two Thousand Guineas, but the Aga Khan colt overcame this handicap, and scored a clever and popular victory (says "Sporting Life"). Incidentally both he and Bright Knight confirmed their two-year-old form with the majority of their opponents. If Diophon edged a little to the left and out. of the true line coming down Bushes Hill it was quite excusable, as Tom Pinch's erratic swerve no doubt was the primary cause. Diophon has the habit of putting his ears back when passing another horse, but this must be really a mannerism with him, for no horse could have stuck the finish out better than he did, and there is little doubt but that he will now become an established favourite for the Derby, though, of course, Bright Knight will not want for backers for the race. On May 19, at St. Cloud, Sir Gallahad (who previously had won the Linjeolnshire Handicap) beat Epinard. Bpi- | nard carried 9st 51b, and Sir Gallahad ;Bst 71b, and the match was for a cup I value 20.000 francs and a forfeit of j 10,000 francs. Sir Gallahad had the ifoot of his rival until the straight was reached, when Epinard drew up to him, and gained a slight advantage, but O'Xeill was taking a breather, and at I the distance called on his mount, wha j responded gamely, and snatched the verdict by the official decision of a short I head. It was a great finish, and raised j great enthusiasm (says the Paris corresipondent of "Sporting Life"'). Epinard j loses none of his prestige, as he was giving his opponent 111b. Moreover. Kir Gallahad is at the top of bis form, while 1 should say that Epinard could be made fitter, his trainer having an eye to future events. -All the same, ■]i>ir Gallahad is a great horse, and it 'is not astonishing that lie won the. Lincolnshire Handicap. ; "What a noble-looking animal is All Black' , (writes "Snowilen' , in the "Australasian ".) '"This .-"'i of Galiinulc and ' Vortex was a high class performer ia ' J England. His best winning performance was in capture t he Ascot Derby, and ha run a tantalising number of seconds in handicaps eucli as the Manchester Cup, Great .liiiiili-e Handicap, ( hesu-r Cup, etc. Imported to New Zealand, All Black at once made, his mark in the (stud, and transplanted to Australia ho ; has continued to sire high-class winners. j Because early in ],i* career he sired a smashing good mare in Desert Gold, and I cut Maid of the Mist in his first session i iii Victoria, it has been the custom in I some quarters (o describe All Black as j essentially a filly begetter, and to wag jtht: head in a sagely negative fashion I when glancing askance at his colts. In turf ami stud matters n,.,st of us are tiio prone to jump to conclusions, and I fail to take eosmisaii.e of all the facts of the case. The All Black fallacy is a sinning crauipe. Desert OoM "ami Maid of the Mist are continually quoted, ami t,, Lack up the idea All Serene, Golden Beauty ami lesser lights are railed upon. But numerically his colts can make a much greater winning display. It is true no two compare for I brilliance with Desert Gold and Maid of , the Mist, but Pershore won the Metropolitan in goo,! style. Kick Off was a high class winner in Xcw Zealand, Kgypt. Xijrger Minstrel. K[ Dorado Hunting and All Sunshine have all won good races on the flat, while All AbrmH j and Delusion have made their mark over I the battens." .

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Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume 55, Issue 152, 28 June 1924

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TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume 55, Issue 152, 28 June 1924

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