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TURF NOTES.

(By WHALEBONE, l Mr. B. Irish, owner of Papyrus, has ecided to send Durobelle to the stud, o the daughter of White Eagle and ■lyrobelle can be considered to have fun er last race when contesting the "hree-Year-Old Handicap at Leicester ast month. She is to be mated with 'eriosteum, the winner of the Ascot lold Cup. A particularly good-looking juvenile tinner at Warwick (England) last nonth was Ariadne. She has nice size, nd is likely to train on into a very iseful filly, without, perhaps, attaining 0 the top class. She is by Arion, the Jubilee" winner of 1910, a sire retained iy the late Lord Jersey's executors, the irst of whose stock to win was Artemis it Lingfield. Seldom is a two-year-old of Fianna's lass seen out in a race at Warwick, mt Sir Edward Hulton's daughter if Gay Crusader and Fifinella, who, by .he way, is by a Derby winner out of a Derby winner, stooped to conquer a noderate opposition in the Grove Park two-Year-Old Plate. She was always avourite, and from the entrance of the straight was pulling over her rivals, winning just as far as Elliott cared ta et her. EWEN J. ALISON, Tun., A popular member of the "six-and-eight" fraternity, being a partner in the firm of Alison and AJderton, solicitors. Of a bright and breezy disposition, Ewen junior has the family fondness for sport, and as a young man — he is not very old now, donned the jersey and enjoyed a game of football. But it is the racecourse which haa the greatest fascination for his sporting instinct, and for some years he has owned and raced horses with a fair share of success. One of the first to carry the grey, cream sash and cap was the 'chafer Ngatoa, which brought off a surprise victory in the New Zealand Grand National Steeplechase in 1915. Thrac was another good jumper he owned, am he won both on the flat and ove hurdles. Some Boy IL, which paid ove half a hundred when he won th Plumpton Handicap at Avondale ii 1919, Geoffrey, and Khublai Kian wer all winners raced by E. W. junior, an this season he has had Namuter battling for him with some success, j. good sport, very popular, with a larg army of friends, it is hoped he will ye have the pleasure of leading in a Derb; winner. Stanley Wootton just now is on th flood tide of success, and Stuff Gown ha proved himself a rare paying propos tion to the Epsom trader, says an Enc lish exchange. Following on his man successes over hurdles, came tbe foui year-old's victory in the Derbyshir Handicap last month, and no horse conl possibly have run home gamer than h did to relegate Brinklow to second plac after the latter had set up what looke to be a winning advantage from th bend for home. M. Wertheimer, owner of Epinard Mr. Brindley, a Dublin breeder; ■ an Leigh, the American trainer at Maison: Laffitte, were the principal figures in case of a disputed sale of two raci horses which was heard by the Par Civil Court recently. After hearing bot sides, the Court deferred judgment. Tl dispute arose over two thoroughbred Villora and Mediator, belonging to M Brindley, who alleges to have sold the to M. Wertheimer as ftallions f( breeding purposes for the sum i 75,000fr. Mr. Brindley claims paymen while M. Wertheimer declares that 1 never bought the two horses. A private gallop ground with an i foresting history has been acquired i Newmarket (Eng.) by Lord Derby fro the Jockey Club. The gallop lies on tl Norwich Road on the opposite side the Limekilns, and formerly belong the late Sir John Blundell'Maple. Waugh trained numerous winners thei For some years it was rented 1 Gilpin's and Lambton's stables, and w 1 ploughed up during the war. It is c !pected that the gallop will be ready f • use by Lord Derby's horses in midsui I mer, and that it will afford a good trai j ing ground some seven furlongs or mo in length, chiefly for two-year-olds. Tho jockey of the moment in Engla is beyond question Smirke, the vout | ful apprentice attached to Stanl Wootton's stable. This precocious 1 i has already a dozen winners to his cretins season, and as he can ride at a f< pounds over 7st his services are certa ■ to be in great demand. Smirke. w - is the son of a professional boxer, h been described as " a second Fra | Wootton," and we would not ventv 1 to assert that this description is flatti ing. Smirke rides with a dash and cor dence remarkable in one who has \ to attain his eighteenth year- He i said to cherish the ambition of headi 1 the riding list at the end of the ca paign. and if he maintains his prese irate of progress he will take sni ! stopping, though Elliott looks li ; giving him a good run. j The Bishop of Chelmsford (Dr. Gi Warman'!. writing in the Essex "Dioc san Chronicle," on the report of t Select Committee on Betting Duty, say "To some Christian folk betting ai gambling is sinful. For those who ho that view the question is settled. B '■ there are many, probably the majorii : of Christian people, who do not fir themselves able quite to take that vie' I do not want to be unkind, but I ha* sometimes seen indications that tho who cavil at too great strictness in th matter are those who have a full sha of the pleasures of life in other dire tions. I have lots of sympathy for tho: who are living cramped and leisurele lives in our mean streets; I have litt ; for those whose ideal of life is sel I gratification. I do not want to jud; 1 others} each, man must judge hiiuseif

Prince Henry, riding Ocean m. in th# 10th Royal Hussars Past and Present Race at'the Cavalry Steeplechases last month, at Arborfield Cross, exliibited sound horsemanship, and won by two lengths from Lt.-Col. Graham's Bally - houra. The number of persons who passed through the turnstiles and gates at Aintree on the occasion of the Grand National last March was the smallest since the war, viz., 75,562. In March, 1923, the figures slightly exceeded 83,500, and KU.OOU and odd paid for admission in 1922, but we believe the figures in the "boom" year, 1019, exceeded'9o.ooo paying visitors. It is officially computed that the race this year was witnessed by approximately 200,000 people. The Liverpool Grand National winner. Master Robert, is of the hunting type, and that is the sort required for Aintree. He won comfortably, though he may have been a trifle fortunate to escape trouble, a.-' loose horses caused a lot of grief, but he fenced boldly, even iif he made a hole in the last fence, as jalso did Fly Mask. As regards his luck, ITrudgill, according to his own state•ment, was twice nearly out of the saddle and only kept his seat by clinging to his mount's neck. There can have been few greater bargains in horseflesh than Patsy V., whom Mr. Lemon secured for some £50 for hunting purposes (says an English writer;. He has since won some twelve point-to-points, the National Hunt Steeplechase, and now the valuable Liverpool Foxhunters' Steeplechase. His owner, a barrister, who takes great in- ] terest in hunting and farming, rode a particularly well-judged race, and horse and rider had a reception that would have done honour to a Grand National winner. Askew, a three-year-old-son of Poor Boy, a winner of races in England and in India, recently won the Eden Plate (Div. I.), value £300, at Calcutta, and Pauvrette, by the same sire, the Darjeeling Plate, also in Calcutta. On the same date, in South Africa, Little Lrchin (another son of Poor Boy) was victor in the Divided Ascot Handicap (Div. I.) at Capetown. Venus de Milo, by Poor Boy, won on March 1 the Moderate Handicap at Capetown. During January and February Poor Boy's stock won thirteen races in India and South Africa, value about £3300. Elijah Wheatley, who in his apprentice days achieved a double record by heading the list of successful jockeys, and with a record number of winning brackets, has completely recovered from the illness which kept him out of the saddle during the major portion of last season, says " Sporting Life," Although • | only sporting silk on one occasion, on • j Happy in the Carrick Plate, at Ayr, i Wheatley showed all his old-time capabilities and judgment, and as he is able Ito go to scale at a nice weight, the oldj time Baumber apprentice should not • lack for patronage this year. In connection with the Irish Grand National, run at Fairyhouse on. Easter Monday, a puzzling situation confronted the Stewards of the Irish National Hunt Steeplechase Committee at their meeting the previous week. In the con--1 i ditions of that race it was laid down ! that the highest weight be 12st 71b, but j when the handicap appeared Halston ' I was seen to have been given 13st. It • did not appear to have been noticed by ' i anyone that the conditions had been ' ! contravened, and so the first acceptance -•: for the race was declared. Then tha i ! attention of the steeplechase authorities I | was directed to the handicapper's error, ' i and the stewards having considered the position in all its bearings, decided that the handicap be cancelled, and that a : new one be published. 1 Will Man o' War, retired champion i. thoroughbred of the century, in answer - to the call of the nation, be brought 3 from his Kentucky court and put in ■_ training to repel the French invader, ; Epinard? (asks an American writer). , If the horses in this country i show in . early races this year that there is a -, reasonable chance that any of them can r conquer the French star, Man o' War i will remain in retirement, where Samuel D. Riddle, his owner, prefers he shall c stay. If, as is probable, the lack of class is apt and America stands in danger of losing thoroughbred supremacy, . then the heavyweight champion will be called to the colours. "If there were two | Man o' Wars, I would certainly race him | against Epinard," Mr. Riddle stated I recently, "but there is only one, and the | risk of accident is too great. There is . ! too much at stake in the breeding poten- * j tialities of Man o' War. Man o' War is • j a giant now," he added, referring to his - recent visit to the champion. "He is 3 not fat, nor ever was. I hope that a k " demand for Man o' War, who is at Far- ' r away farm in Kentucky, will not be l " made," he continued, "but there is not 1_ a horse alive that can beat Man o' War. c He can be put on condition in a short time to do his best. In fact, he is in training to keep in good condition. Be d is galloped every morning." i- ' " y There is surely a spice of romanc* ■d about the history of the eleven-year-old it i Irish-bred horse Master Robert, which ""■achieved for a Scottish laird Ithe Lar! :n lof Airliel the generally unexpected and 10 ! surprising distinction of winning the is I Liverpool Grand National —the great k steeplechase race of the year. Master re j Robert was bred in County Donegal by r-la Mr. McKinley. who. fi-.ding him such n- ; a disappointing proposition that he put ;t : him to pull a plough, at three years old. is i could scarcely in his wildest dreams have ,£ | pi-tured his sorry hack emerging, in the n " i best of company, the winner of one or ,t j the classic races under the admiring eye ie'of the King! Mr. McKinley eventually ■ c I sold him to an Ulster horse dealer named I Joseph Laverty for £40. Still he jibbed [at the simplest fence. Then a curious v thing happened. Tlip hitherto dormant ,". blood of some illustrious ancestor must. ' I have suddenly revived when, on being . j tried one day a hunt came along and __ | he was off in full chase, clearing cv»ry _ I fence that came his way with the greatt I est ease. From this point he was used r j regularly in the hunt, and his prio- went ■j ! up. Joseph Laverty said him to P. - | llogers, the Irish trainer, for £200. Then c he came into the hand? of an English c I owner, for whom he won several point s to point races, and eventually he was c ! acquired by the Earl of Airlie and Major . . Sidney Greene of the 10th Hussars, in c whose hands he wa? a winner a* the R Perth Hunt and other ra<"es. And f-n c Master Robert progressed from the . plough to tiie Grand National—surely c a unique record of the Turi m its prosaic " I and classic aspects.

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Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume LV, Issue 122, 24 May 1924

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2,175

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume LV, Issue 122, 24 May 1924

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