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TURF NOTES.

(By WHALEBONE.) M. tjabathier has marked the victory of Quoi in the French Oaks by giving 50iV) franei to French racing charities. I It is reported that Parth, who finished third in the English Derby, has found a new oa-iipi- at a long price, 20,0OOgns. \ j being the li;_;pre talked of. I I Tracery still maintains his lead of Lem- ! berg in the list of winning sires, the dif- | ference between the two being a little I over ..1500. I It was somewhat surprising to find the : selling plater, Bart Snowball, favourite ! for the London Cup, but he ran fairly .'well, finishing fourth. Probably the disj tanee was a little too far for him. j How the old habits stick to one. For I years the Eclipse Stakes, was the richest ! race in the English Calendar, but it is no longer correct so to describe the Sandown ten thousand pounder. The Derby this j year ivas worth well over £11,000. | Rabelais, although in bis twenty-third ! year, continues to sire a number of good winners in France. His two-year-olds have done remarkably well. Katcrfelto, one of his sons, has won two races, including the Grand Criterion at Ostend, and in so far the .best youngster seen out. Rabelais is a worthy son of St. Simon, who in 1901, though over 21 years of age, was head of the list of winning sires in England. I In the House of Commons Mr. Cooper Rawson asked the Postmaster-General j n lie would explain why letters sent from England for the purpose of participating jhi the Irish Derby sweepstake were rej turned to the senders by his Department, | while sweepstakes were not prohibited ;in thousands of clubs and other insti- | tutions in England, and if he would per- | mit such letters to be forwarded in i future to their destination? The Home I Secretary (Mr. Bridgeman) writes in i reply:—"As the letters were stopped under a warrant issued by mc, I have been asked' to answer this question. Sweepstakes, participation in which is confined to members of bone-fide clubs or societies, have not been held to be illegal, and no action is therefore taken by mc in respect of such sweepstakes. Public sweepstakes, on the other hand, are illegal, and if an offence is committed jin England and the necessary evidenco is available, proceedings are taken against the offender. In winning the Findon Hunt Steeplechase on his own horse, Stroll Along, says a Melbourne writer, Mr. C. Grice I added W> a remarkable sequence of victories in that event. He has ridden in ' , tbe race on seven occasions, and has | won each time. His victories were j gained on Lord Emms, Swedish Lad, I Kornang, Statistician, .Tohr> Michael, ! . lonrose, and Stroll Along. On Swedish j Lad Mr. Grice also had a sequence of I seven successful rides. He handled ' Stroll Along in his inimitable style. Mr. I Grice has won each of the three hunt Steeplechases run this winter, havin. scored previously in the Melbourne Hunt Steeple and Woodlands Hunt Steeple. In ] Stroll Along he has a highly promising I steeplechaser. The gelding is a five-year- j } old. by Perambulator, son of Persim- | mon, and sire of Pram, from Yarrabin, sister to Trafalgar, by Wallace from Grand Canary, by Splendor from Can- i ary, by Lapidist. With such a pedi- | gree, it is not surprising that Stroll i Along shows galloping and jumping i abilitq. I Huntingdonshire was keenly interested in the romance of the Derby. Mr. I Irish, owner of Papyrus, the winner, is a Huntingdonshire man who started life as a draper's apprentice in Hunt- , , ingdon. One of the modest of men ! i Mr. Irish has had a very successful I career, first as an hotel proprietor at I j Peterborough, and then as a farmer J , and stockbreeder at Sawtry. Everybody i lin the county ventured a little bit on (Papyrus. It is recalled by old sports- I men that Teddington, which won the i i Derby in ISSI. was bred close to the! I county town. It is interesting to note '• that the dam of Teddington was given .by Sir Joseph Hawley to a. Mr. Toralinson, who kept the Toll Bar at GodI manchester, where Sir Joseph used to •call on bis way to and from NcwmarI ket. Mr. Irish has owned one or two jollier horses of minor account, but since 'the retirement of Periosteum, which won I the Ascot Gold Cup two years ago, his I colours had been seldom carried until i Papyrus, which was bought at DonI caster sales as a yearling for 3000gs, j commenced bis career. Papyrus vanquished Town Guard and others in the Criterion Stakes at Newmarket last October. His prospects for the Derby were then enhanced, and Mr. Irish, with ■ the knowledge that his colt was winter- ' ing well, always spoke in the most coni fident terms. I . j Sandringham won the Chatsworth i Plate at Caulfield recently 'in such lattractive style that Mr. L. K. S. MacIkinnon should have no reason to regret !paying L.OOgs. for the son of Woorak and Our Queen as a yearling, i Though the colt was in at almost the .minimum weight. and received more than .Ist. from The Monk, he finished I full 'of running, and may have just •started to strike form. Sandringham -appears to be developing in a manner similar lo that of his half brother, |Heir Apparent. In the spring of 1021 'Heir Apparent, which was then trained jby 11. \V. Torr for tbe breeder, Mr. ;.T. I. Winter-Irving, rendered spectators j bereft of speech by capturing the spe-cial-weight Batman Stakes, for three- ; year-olds, at Flemington. Having ! finished third in the Victoria Derby and fourth in the Melbourne Cup, Harivest King was made a " to 1 favourite, but Heir Apparent (33 to 1) defeated him by half a length. Owing to the projected departure of his owner for j Europe, Heir Apparent came up for sale, and Mr. H. A. Armytage bought him for 3300 guineas. Subsequently Mr. McKinnon acquired a half intcre.t in the horse. It was in the following autumn that he gave 1500 guineas for Sandrincham. In the last Sydney Cup the stable stood to win a fortune over Heir .A .parent lint David stood in the way. Having prodiieeel such horses as Flaith (by Bobadil i, Xaxbery (by Positano'i, Seigneur (by Comedy King), Heir Apparent (by Comedy King), and Sandringham (by , Woorak), tho career of Our Queen at ithe stud has been very brilliant.

] "Audax," in "Horse and Hound," says I that Mr. Jas. de Rothschild, when ptirI chasing Legend from Sir H. CunliffeOwen, tossed him whether ho should pay £500 or £1000 for tho colt and won. I Wootton's apprentice, Ingham, was rid- ! ing in the Royal jacket for the first time when ho won the Hunt Cup on Weathervane. Ono of the best-looking and best matured yearlings that came under the ! hammer in July at Newmarket, was tho j colt by Galloper Light out of Hiawaga, but as the youngster did not make the reserve of 3,ooogns put upon him Mr. R. Davieson, his breeder, has sent him to _ Piggott to be trained for his future engagements. Tho English sportsman, Mr. W. I Raphael, whose Waygood won the Irish Derby at the Curragh last month, has sent to Mr. F. Harold Clarke, Keeper of the Match Box in Ireland, a cheque for £50 for the benfit of the Drogheda Memoral Fund, which is administered by the Stewards of the Turf Club and Irish NNational Hunt Steeplechase Committee to help trainers and jockeys who are in necessitous circumstances. The reputation of a stallion hangs on many trifling and unreasonable considerations, say_. a' London exchange. Thus Captain Cuttle's Derby victory was such a smashing success for Hurry On that the failure of Town Guard has affected hi_ sire more adversely by way of contrast. I There is such a thing as being too successful early on, and thus setting a standard which you have to live up to, and suffer if you fail to do so. It is far safer to begin slowly, as Bayardo and Lemberg did, and work on to full strength. Considering tbe frequency with which the Australian Steeplechase has been. won by recruits from the ranks of hurdleracer., the cross-country course at Caulfield obviously cannot *be difficult. Blue Mountain had not jumped a fence in public before he captured the first "four miler," and it was the same with successive winners, in Arcadia, Colonel Shilinski, My Mistake, and Airly. Bribery (19071 was another graduate from the hurdling division, while Battleship, Cuffs, Gazomp and Bright Maid had little experience of stiff timber before their names were enrolled on the list of Australian Steeplechase winners. An important decision affecting laieloff bets was eiven at Bow County Court recently by Judge Snagge. The point raised was whether a bookmaker can recover money "laid off" with him by a -.ommission a.ent if the agent has not paid over to him such money. On the other band, it was contended that agency should 'be proved' in the case of every bet made, as well as the receipt lof the money in every case. The jud .c upheld this view. The matter is scarcely I likely to be allowed to remain where it is by this decision. Tbe Special Commissioner of the "London Sportsman" writes: — The policy by which Tracery is insured for three years is now at the office of tho International Horse Agency and Exchange, and it is a nnioue document, not only beecau-e it extends over three years, but because it is backed by the names of no fewer than 444 Lloyds' I underwriters. There may have been . horso insurance policies more numerj ously underwritten than this, but I. at any rate, have never seen one. The nearest approach to it with which T j have bad nnWhi. r* to do was the insurance of Flyin. Fox for £40.000. for I tbe journey to France in March. 1000. i The underwriters in that ease totalled 201. It is questionable whether there has ever been a time in which we have had ; a greater number of first-rate boy jockeys .ban the present, says an English writer. In the nineties. Bradford, jwhen an apprentice, could hold his own with his elders, while in later years Johnny Reiff and Frank Wootton achieved remarkable success as boys, i But whereas the riders named stood out jby themselves in their particular I periods, we now have quite a number of lads right at the top of the tree. One lof these, Elliott, maintains has position at the head of the winning jockeys list, '.while R. A. Jones has also established |his reputation. Smirke has done likeIwise to a lesser degree, while other j youngsters who are well in the lime- ' ilight include Perryman and Ingham. jThe pair last named were concerned in a dead-heat at Lingfield recently, while :the former later won outright oil tho • uncertain Houdale. It is eminently ; satisfactory to find the younger generation of jockeys thus asserting themselves. Now that R. J. Mason has sold Laseelles and Golden Tresses to Mr. J. ]J. Leahy, he will be able to devote the ■rest of his time in attending to the preparation of Gloaming, says "Glen'jcoe." Doubtless he got a good price for the horses named, but it would seem as if tbe Martian three-year-old is not as I (food a- be was boomed to be. or Mason I would ii, t have parted with him. A | really good three-year-old could win ! several thousands in stakes at the com- ; ing meetings in Sydney and Melbourne. _ilr. Leahy is better known as the • 'owner of that good horse Speciality, winner of the Doncaster Handicap aud ' | Metropolitan Handicap at Randwick. 1 Under the beading "Racing Trouble" •the "Sydney Daily Telegraph" 6ays there is a possibility that the grievances voiced by owners, trainers, and book- ! makers connected with registered and I unregistered horse-racing, may reach a very soon. The "registered • owners and trainers are dissatisfied jvrith the small prize money given by tho proprietary clubs, and it is under- ; stood that they contemplate asking for -, an increase in the stakes. Some of the - j "pony" owners and trainers are con- , sidcring a boycott, and the bookmakers 1 are up in arms regarding the Rosehill i Club's action in charging a full halfyear's license fee in addition to an extra ' fee for the club's meeting that will be : held at Randwick on September 1.".. which follows upon the increased foes t imposed by the A.J.C. It is proposed ; that th.c "three bodies—registered and ." unregistered owners and trainers, and ) the bookmakers —should hold a conferr encr to deal with the subject. Another ; matte:- that may shortly come under ; review is the taxation of the race-going ' public; tho charge now being 5/ per • head more than hitherto for the pad- • dock enclosure; and a corresponding m- • crease for the Leger reserve, the clubs , having passed this charge on to the public-

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TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume LIV, Issue 208, 1 September 1923

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2,176

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume LIV, Issue 208, 1 September 1923

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