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WOMEN'S WORLD.

SOCIAL JOTTINGS

Mies Jeanne Russell, of Epsom, is spending a holiday at Wellington. Mr. A. Crum and Miss Pear! Crum. of Anckland, who have been visit iug Lien beim, are in Cbristchnrch. Miss Peggy Lee, late of Otahuhu. nov of Ponsonby, leaves by the Mali run in- - - 7 Thursday on.a holiday visit to her uncle Mr. J. -'• Stewart, West End. I ralia.

Mr. and Mrs. Howartb (London*. Mr and Mrs. Stace (Hamilton). Mr. and Mrs. M_~kay (Sydney). Mrs. Douglas and Son (Auckland) are staying at Mon Desir Hotel, Takapuna.

Mrs. E. Baird Friberg. who left Christ church on a holiday sketching trip to the Franz Josef Glacier, on tlic West Coast, has had to abandon it. owing to severe illness at Greymouth.

A very quiet wedding was celebrated in Wellington last week by the Rev Canon Fielden-Taj'lor between Sir George Hunter, M.P. for Waipawa, and Mrs. E. M. (Munro, Wellington Terrace. Only relatives and very intimate friends were present.

The engagement is announced in the "Sydney Sun" of Miss Eileen C_ mil- youngest daughter of the late Joshua • J ill. o< Dubbo, and Mrs. GUI, of Cremorne. and Mr. George A. Miller, of Auckland, only 6on of Mr. and Mrs. Miller, of Mangcre. Xew Zealand.

Under the National Education League's scheme for the interchange of teachers in various parts of the Empire three more teachers .have arrived from Canada. They are Mrs. Silcock and Miss M, McCougin, from Winnipeg, and Miss L. Lewis, from Saskatchewan. They will stay in New Zealand for a year, and will teach in different districts.

Mr. and Mrs. Peake, who have been staying at Takapuna for the last six months, are returning to their home at Te Awamutu. A "bridge" afternoon was given la_t Friday as a farewell to Mrs. Peake by Mrs. Dingle. Besides the guests of honour were Mesdames Hart, A. Brett, F-. E. Gaudin, Lewins, Howe, Clark, Bertram, Deighton, Winter, Cutler, Thompson, Beid.

The engagement Is announced of Miss Isabel Massey, youngest daughter of the Bight Hon. W. F. and Mrs. Massey, and Mr. C. W. Salmon, of Cory-Wright and Salmon, engineers, of Wellington. Mr. Salmon served with the New Zealand Engineers in Gallipoli and France, and received liis commission in the field. He rose to the rank of major, was mentioned in dispatches, and awarded the D.C.M.

The portrait of Princess Mary, by J. J. Shannon lent anonymously) and of Lord Lascelles, by St. Helier Lauder, were centres of attraction at Burlington House, i Later they had a companion in Harrington Mann's portrait of the Princess, for the exhibition of which her Boyal Highness had just given permission. This showed the Prinee«3 in her nurse's dress, and formed an interesting contrast to the Shannon portrait, a charming, if conventional, canvas, in -which the pearl-white chiffon frock contrasts with the bronze velvet curtain behind that shows up the petty sister's golden hair, bound by a fillet of wheatears, very charmingly.

Professor Annie Heloise Abel, of Smith College, United States, passed through Auckland last week en route to America. Miss Abel was the guest of Miss Northeroft, of "Bangiatua," Kpsoni. while in the city. Miss Abel, who specialises in /history, has recently become engaged to Professor Henderson, history professor of the Adelaide University, who has -written a "Life of Sir George Grey." and after returning to her own university for a year, she will be married and proceed to England, where they will spend soroe time in collaboration un a

"History of the Colonisation of Xew Zealand and South Australia." the subject which Professor Abeleame to NewZealand to study.

The marriage took place on February 21, at St. Stephen's Presbyterian Church. of Miss Marjorie Brown, youngest daughter of Mrs. a..d the. late Mr. .Tames Brown, of "Lochaber," Sarslield Street. Herne Bay. to Mr. Jack Howard, second son of Mrs. and the late Frederick Thomas Howard, of Ponsonby. The church was tastefully de orated for the occasion by friends of the bride. TheJ bride, who was given away by her brother, Mr. Malcolm Brown, of Pokeno. wore wMte charmeuse draped with white silk georgette, with court train of same lined with -shell pink crepe de- chine and a tulle veil wreathed with orange blossoms. She carried a bouquet of white asters, lilies, and maiden hair fern. Miss Marjorie Prendergast (niece ol" the bride) was the train-bearer, and wore a dress of white 'crepe de chine with a mob cap. The bride was attended by two bridesmaids, Miss Gladys Wate'rton (niece of the bride), who wore a frock of pale blue crepe de chine with a black tulle hat; and Miss jMarjorie Howard (sister of the bridegroom), in pale pink crepe de chine, with hatrto match. Mr. P. Keatley acted as man, and Mr. Murray Fraser was grdpmsman.

THE ROYAL MARRIAGE

The marriage of Princess Mary, which takes plate in London to-morrow, appeals to British people all over the Kmpire. The Princess, heri.brother. has endeared herself to them'.iby pretty little thoughtful acts whichf-are constantly recurring, and have brought her near the heart of the people. ; On one occasion, when she was visiting the Star and Garter Hospital for"men totally disabled in the war, the medical officer mentioned that one poor fellow had been a French cleaner, and to him had always come ber riding gloves when soiled. The Princess went at once to him and assured him that ahe remembered how well he bad always done them for her. and her deep regret that he would never follow his useful calling again. This was but one instance of the kindly consideration for those in distress which has guided both the Princess' and her mother's actions throughout their lives. Princess Mary possesses the genius of the Royal Family for remembering faces, and gives constant pleasure by recognising quiet people who have been presented to her on former occasions. With children she is , always very happy. Many girls are wondering what the daughter of the greatest lady in the land will wear to-morrow, •jand it is stated that the material for "..Princess Mary's wedding gown was iwoven at the old hand silk looms of -""Stftssrs. Warner and Sons, at Bra in tree, This firm has long held the repuRgg of being the Royal silk weavers, made the cloth of gold and garby the King and Queen at ~-ation. Sir Frank Warner, the fifce firm, has been president of ,7 *V/?ijk .Association, and has /■4-aL l *'P'? rib V or in « a i e Ußtry alive. Braintree's /.R-*d if% very old, and the art ' WlaWVk' '

of weaving by hand has been passed down from generation to generation, whole families being engaged. The train is of white satin, four and a-halt yards long, so linely embroidered that it resembles brocade. The outstanding feature in the design of the embroidery consists of the national flowers of the I'nited Kingdom and the Dominions | overseas: the rose, shamrock, thistle and 1 daffodil, the maple of Canada, wattle for I Australia, and fern for Xew Zealand, also border design of lotus buds for India worked in Indian silver lace on the -.'y mm. the same as the Queen's mother "wore when she was married. Where it j fall- from the shoulders, the train is I draped with beautiful Itoniton lace, the I Queen's gift. Across her shoulders the ! Prime-.- will wear a wide c-mine stole. I The veil is of tulle Alcncon. outlined in pearls and held hy three delicate strands of orange blossom, forming a light coronet. Other looms are preparing the other silken materials, all of radiant colours, which form the trousseau. Fifteen Irish peasant girls, pickpd needle-, I workers, made part of the lingprie for ' Princess Mary's trousseau in their ' home.-. The Princess selected the model : , for three sets. The girls had been i selected from those who supply the lloval Iri-h Industries Association. There | arc tv he six of each set of lingerie. They (are ill t'i I"' "f very fine Irish linen. iOn one set is to lie what the Irish call i --tine stitcher*." The threads are | drawn.' and when stitched have the I appearance of lace-work. they are jso line. This stitehery is to be i headed, with a space of linen between. ! with real lace round tlic necks and ! sleeves of the garments. The lace, which 'is about half an inch wide, is set on j plain. The nightdresses will have short Isleeves, and satin ribbon, about an inch 'wide, in Princess Mary's colour—pale blue—is to lie threaded round the waist. IThis set is to be lace encrusted, which ; niakis it look as if it is part, of the fine ! linen. The models for the third set are delicately embroidered with Irish pointstitch. Beautiful simplicity is the keynote of all the trousseau garments. All the garments ordered are white, and only white or pale blue ribbons are to j ibe used.

Had the Princess Mary married into a reigning European family, the wedding ■would ihave had to 'be aip-ajrged ii| accordance with the wedding ceremony prevailing at the Court of the future husband. But as things are. the King will have entire control of all the wedding arrangements. In normal times a week after the announcement of a royal betrothal the wedding presents begin to arrive in large numbers for the bride and bridegroom. The Princess Mary a short time ago had received four wedding gifts and Lord .Lascelles three, none of them particularly costly or valuable. Inquiries among the West End shopkeepers revealed the fact that the flood of orders they expected to get for wedding gifts directly the announcement of the royal i-betrotiial was made has not arrived, That the Princess will receive a number of costly presents goes without saying, but the hardships which all classes in England are no«- suffering are reflected in the quantity and quality of the wedding gifts coming to Princess IMarv and Lord Lascelles.

The details of the marriage settlement by Lord Lascelles have all been approved by the King. It will be one of the most voluminous deeds of its kind on record and will cover 70 folios of quarto parchment. It will take six weeks to engross.

The main financial clause in it is to provide for a settlement by Lord Lascelles of £250.000 on the Princess. The money will he held in trust by three trustees, of whom the Prince of Wales is one. llie interest on the money will become payable to the Princess personally from the date of the marriage, and iv the event of Lord L&sceliles dying before the Princess the sum of i." 250,000 passes to her and the trust comes to an end.

I In the event of the Princess predeceasing her future husband and if there are no children of the marriage, the i.'_si;,ooo would go back to the Lascelles family; Lord Lascelles' father, the Karl of Tarewood, under the deed of settlement, undertakes to create a charge on his property of -25,000 for each child of the marriage born lwfore his death.

After his death the obligation to '.•rente these churges on the property [or the benefit ol the children of the marriage devolves on Lord ..ascelles.

Forty pages of the settlement deed deal with the eventuality of Lord c-elles dying before his lather.

Ten pages ot" the document will be occupied with ,-ome remarkable and unusual provisos. For example, there is a clause guarding the Princess from any loss under the settlement, if (for no fault on her side] she finds it impossible to live with her husband and she finds it necessary either to return to live with her parents or with some other relation-..

Tiie deed will be signed by Lord Lascelles, his father, and the King, and it will be registered as a legal document under a special proviso dealing with the marriage settlements of members of the Koyal Family.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19220227.2.121

Bibliographic details

WOMEN'S WORLD., Auckland Star, Volume LIII, Issue 48, 27 February 1922

Word Count
1,979

WOMEN'S WORLD. Auckland Star, Volume LIII, Issue 48, 27 February 1922

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