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TURF NOTES.

(By WHALEBONE.! Since the stock of Malster began racing they have, according to the figures com. piled for "The Australasian Turf RegU. ter," won £258,017 in stakes. Maltster first entered the winning sires' list in the 1906-7 season. His stock continue to win races, and for the nine months "bf the present season lie has been represented by 38 winners of 71 races, the stake earnings being £10,061. Tetratema, which led the field home in the Two Thousand Guineas at Newmarket, is, like his sire, The Tetrarch, of the grey shade in colour. It is interesting to note that only on three occasions has a colt of the grey shade led the field home in the Two Thousand Guineas since.the I ace was instituted 111 years back, and 82 yeare have elapsed between the win of Tetratema and Grey Momus, which carried the colours of Lord George Bentincfci

The damages awarded Mr. A. P. Wads' against the Rosehill Racing Club for ths death of Estland appear to have had its It will interest sporting men gene* rally to learn that "track" (training)' tickets are now issued to trainers who prepare their horses at Randwick on the express stipulation that they can be yoked at any time by the Australian Jockey Club committee, without returning the amount paid to obtain them, and, further, that the use of the trainingngrounds is entirely at the risk of the owner or trainer of the horse or other person using the same, and the club does not guarantee" that the grounds are safe for that purpose, and will, not be liable for any accident that may happen, whether arising from any defect in the state of the grounds or the negligence of the club's servants, or from any other cause whatever.

The death took place on the 21el March, at Polegate (England) of Arthur Clay, ex-jockey and trainer, at the age of 61. He was the (fourth son of the late Mr. William Clay, of Jevington. The deceased commenced hid career as a jockey in John Porter's racing stables at Kingsclere, from whioaY establishment he had his first mount in public on a horse belonging- to the Duke of Westminster. He also rode th* celebrated Ormonde in most of his preparation for the Derby. Later Clay tad a fairly successful career as a jockey in Germany and Russia. Subsequently he settled down in Jevington as a trainer in partnership with his brother-in-law, j Mr. W. Viney, which resulted in the winning of a large number of races, the chief of which were the "Jubilee" Stakes and the Lincolnshire Handicap with Euclid. Clay was for a. tima secretary and manager for the American trainer Huggins, at Newmarket, and was associated with him when he —aa the Derby with Volodyovski.

An argument cropped up in Sydney recently among some noted turfites as to the prospects of bookmakers accumulating wealth in these days compared to what was the case a few years ago. The question as to which was the best year from a bookmaker's point of view was also discussed. Mr. N. Dxenham gave aa, interesting illustration, both from -the . backers' and from the bookmakers' point of view. He stated that on one occasion he backed the mare Cerise and Blue for.. the Melbourne Cup to win £100,000, and. could have obtained a. further sum had he desired. From a bookmaking aspect, he quoted the year 1892, trhen Glenloth won the Melbourne Cup, as being the best within his recoUection. On thaw occasion the betting was so" remarkably good that he had no less a sum than' £66,000 in his book, and even bad the worst horse in the race won he -would have been a winner of £4000. Mr. Oxenham did not say how much profit his book showed, but the sum must have been very substantial, Glenloth being one of the least fancied of the starters. There is too much competition in these times, for any member of the ring to operate on such favourable terms.

Commenting on the race for the South Australian Stakes, a writer in "The Age" says: "Probably no finer-looking two-year-old filly than Gloaming's sister Refraction has been seen in the birdcage at Morphettville. J. Scobie did intend to take the filly to Randwick for the big two-year-old races of the autumn, but Refraction did not come up to expectations, and so she was left at Flemington to come on to Adelaide. Scobie waa doubtful as to running her here, but after her arrival she began to improve, and that settled the matter. Hesso, one of the two South Australian crack two-year-olds, was elected favourite, and the racing public showed loyalty in sticking to him. When Mr. Campbell sen* them away Terekia jumped out with a lead. Mr. Hawker's filly, however, had not gone far when Hesso picked her up, and the four of them went down the side almost in line. At the five furlongs post Terekia and Hesso were bowling along together, while Lewis, who was on the outside, waited untn he reached the four-furlong post before he began to shake up Refraction. Hesso, however, came away below the distance, where Refraction began to bang in. and Lewis had to stop riding to pull her out. In another second it was clear that Lewis knew that his filly was beaten, and at that moment Dempsey came on the, outside with Carilla, and this daughter of Ths Welkin finished with a fine run. Hesso, •however, gamely answered the call, and he beat Carilla by a narrow margin."

The monthly financial statement for April, issued by the Government, supplies ample evidence of the popularity of racing in New South Dur'ng the past couple of years the sp-rt ha* made jjreat strides, and the attendances have been larger than ever. Tiiis ha* been particularly noticeable evvn as recently as the past couple of Kionths. The Government has benefited accordingly.

Altogether the tote and hetUnj- taJK» have cau=ed £276,515 to flow nto t*« Treasury for the period July 1, 1919, to April 30, 1920.

The revenue from the tote for April, 1919, amounted to only £6449; bvtl twelve months &g 0 the influenza epidemic was rairing, and very few meetings were held. Last month the tote at all place 3 in New South Wales handled the record sum of over a quarter of a million pounds. Of this the Government's share was £32,837. This sum. compared* witn last year, shows an increase of £27,388.

From betting tax-es the Government last month secured £5091, against £3595 for April, 1919—an -increase of £1196. The figures for the ten months July 1, 1919, to April 30, 1920, also show a big all-round increase over the corresponding period of 19(18-1919. They are as follows:—

Totalisator.—For ten months ended April 30, 1919, £110,511. Teriod ended last Friday, £'1!)3.739—an increase of £83,2-28.

Betting Taxes.—'For ten months ended April 30, 1919, £65,290. Period «nded last £BZJ7s— an iacreasf ,r>f £117.486,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19200529.2.125.6

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume LI, Issue 128, 29 May 1920

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1,162

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume LI, Issue 128, 29 May 1920

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