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ROTORUA SEAT.

LIBERAL CANDIDATE AT MATAMATA. Mr. Malcolm Larney, the'official Liberal candidate for the Rotorua seat, addressed a meeting at Hinuera on Tuesday evening. Mr. C. Smith occupied the chair. The candidate opened his address by explaining the manner in which he was selected by the party to contest the seat. He read the official telegram from Sir Joseph Ward, and stated that that was sufficient to let the electors know exactly where he stood. Speaking personally, he said he was born in the Waikato, the son of a pioneer farmer, Mr. N. A. Larney. The speaker stated that it appeared to him that some new blood was necessary in the recognised parties in the house, but he fully recognised that men with age and experience were necessary to lead in the control of national affairs. He maintained that youth -was wanted in the House, and in this respect he was blessed. Mr. Larney, referring to the question of land settlement, said that this had not been approached in an energetic manner, and referred to the number of men who could not obtain land from the Government as proof of this. The trend wag to congregate in the towns because of this laxity on the part of the Government, and the lack of reasonable services. He advocated that the man on the land should be accorded all the facilities enjoyed by town residents. Although this was undoubtedly due to the country residents it was a recognised fact that the townsmen were firstly considered. He expressed himself as an out-and-out freeholder, although he knew that the opportunity to obtain a leasehold section in the district had placed many farmers upon their feet. However, many of these had "forgotten the hand that fed them— the Liberal party —and appeared to want to burn the bridge that had carried them over."

Speaking regarding the Government Departments, the candidate referred particularly to the railway service, and stated that great reforms were there necessary. Many men were leaving the service because of the unsatisfactory conditions —men who had seen long service, and who could ill be spared. Mr. E. H. Hilcy had reported upon this, but nothing had been done to follow out the suggestions in his report, and conditions had not improved in accordance with other walks of life.

The shipping trusts were criticised by Mr. Larney, who advocated the State purchase of ships for New Zealand trade. He stated that Australia had recognised that to protect the Commonwealth's industries it was most important that it should at least be partially independent in the matter of shipping. This was a step, he suggested, which should be adopted by New Zealand. The farmers of the country, he was convinced, wished this, but there were many capitalists who did not; thus no move was made.

| Mr. Larney dealt at length with other I suggested reforms, including the State purohase of coal mines, and improved living conditions for miners and their families. This, he thought, would go a | long way towards settling the discontent at present existing. Practically all 'mature residents of New Zealand knew of j these conditions, and yet no effort -was J made to improve them.

He advocated an immigration policy for New Zealand, but with a strict inspection into the class brought here. The type of settlers required, he said, was such as those who came out in the first four ships. . These -people were those who had laid the foundations of a race of which he was proud to be a member. Above all he advocated a white New Zealand. "Let us keep out the Asiatics." (Applause.)

Mr. Larney spok e feelingly regarding the settlement of returned soldiers, advocating a larger loan for those taking up. land. Tho maximum allowed for building a house and sheds was £250. "What sort of a house and cowshed could the returned soldier build for that money? Many of these men were married, and many -wished to be. Did the Government encourage these men? Emphatically no." The speaker aUo referred to the legislation put through by the Liberal Governments, and repeated that practically every reform put through by the party had been opposed by the Reformers. H e said that Liberal legislation had proved to be the most beneficent and humani- ' tarian measures ever introduced into the House in New Zealand. In answering questions, Mr. Larney said that he was in favour of a majority of electors in a constituency having the right to recall th e member, but would certainly vote against any measure which would give a committee the ri«ht of recall. He agreed that reformation was necessary with regard to the disposal of Grown lands, but was right against elasticity which would allow of greater land aggregation. He was in favour of the laws dealin" wiflTthr liquor question as at present in the statutes.

MR. TAYLOR OUT OF MAITUKATr CONTEST. Mr. Ralph E. Taylor, who was standing as an Independent Liberal, announces n.s decision to retire from the Mawukau contest He explains that as it seems that the coming election will be purely a party contest, if he goes to the poll it will eimply split the votoe, with so many in the field. He hoped however, to offer his services on some future , occasion when the time was ripe for candidates really independent of party

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19191127.2.118

Bibliographic details

ROTORUA SEAT., Auckland Star, Volume L, Issue 282, 27 November 1919

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893

ROTORUA SEAT. Auckland Star, Volume L, Issue 282, 27 November 1919

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