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TURF NOTES.

I (By * •WHALEBONE.*') The Caulfield Cup was worth £4000 and a trophy (valued at £100) to'the winner. ■ At a recent meeting of the V.A.TC Committee it was decided not to admit any more ladies as members of the club. The Indian sportsman, Mr. J. C. Galston, suffered heavy loss just before the last mail left, as the English horse Dansellon, which he paid 6000gs for, died a couple of days after it reached Bombny It contracted pneumonia on the voyage!

Sir Samuel Hordern and Mr. A. D Murphy headed the list of winning owners at the V.S.'C. Meeting with £8379 —to which is added the trophy connected with the Melbourne Cup—won by Artilleryman, whose winnings this season work out at over £13,300.

According to an English writer, a good deal of vigilance which is now being exercised by the stewards of the Jockey Club is due to the initiative and the strong personality of Lord Lonwiale, who is determined to cleanse the Turf of flagrant abuses, so far as he is able.

Richmond Main won the Williamstown Cup with such great ease that he must be set down as a really great colt (says a Melbourne writer). It was considered a fine achievement for Newhaven to carry 7.13 to victory in the Melbourne Cup, but Richmond Main had 8.5 in the saddle. Aurum, as a three-year-old, ran third in the Melbourne Cup with 8.6; but only once since then has a similar impost been allotted to a three-year-oVj in the 'big Cup. That was in thi casV of Bobadil, which disappeared from the race as soon as the handicaps appeared. The weakness of the opposition at Williamstown justified Mr. S. Griffiths in penalising Richmond Main to the extent that he did.

Mr. J. "Baron," the owner of Richmond Main, is nob a heavy 'better, jind through waiting until almost the last moment to invest, he hae often had tp take a short price about his horses. This happened in the case of Prince Foote's Melbourne Cup, but the most striking in : stance occurred in connection with the Metropolitan at Randwiek in 1912, won by Duke Foote. On the day of the race Mr. " Baron" accepted £500 to ,£4OO, and Duke Foote started at evens, The" starting price of Duke Foote for the - Wllliamstown Cup of 1911 was 6 to 1; but though Richmond Main had 221b, more weight to carry than Puke Foote the closing offer against the chestnut wa? very short.

Some comment was occasioned by. an interview credited by a Melbourne paper to R. Lewis, after he won the Mel-, ■bourne Cup on Artilleryman. In it he thanked Killorn, the rider of Richmond Main, for pulling out and giving him * clear run on the rails. In another interview Lewis stated that ihe did not intend to convey the impression, that Kit lorn made an opening for his mount coming round the home turn. Lewie explained that Killorn'3 mount was. out-. side, and slightly ahead of Artilleryman,; at that stage, and he considered it was a sportsmanlike action of Killorn in not going over and taking hie (Lewis')' running. ,If Richmond Main had moved across Artilleryman, the latter would have received a severe bump, and would have been forced almost on to the heels of other runners. "However, interference would hardly have affected the result, 1, Lewis added, "as Artilleryman was. going bo well that he could have forced a passage on the outside, and then Won."

After Irish Elegance's victory in th». • Portland Handicap (England), in which he carried the welter weight oi 10.2, KB. English writer had a chat with hie jockey, Carslake. What the Australian lhad to say was: "I have never ridden a horse like Irish Elegance. He gives . his rider a grand feel. His action is of the smoothest, as he swings along in a stride that is almost effortless. In fact, I have never ridden any horse ■■■, quite like him before. He gives you the ' impression that he is doing his best ■■_"■ without being asked. I had no occasion , to call upon him, and I felt that he had. his race won quite a long way from ■ home. Irish Elegance is the best horsel have ever ridden." Irish m said to be one of the finest looking g horses in England, and hae proved himself a high class racehorse. He, however, is not eligible for the English Btud Book owing to some trumpery flaw Iβ his pedigree.

Writing of the C. B. Fisher Plate,a ; Sydney writer says: The "tit-bif of tW day came next, when Cetigne «nd Arteryleryman -went out to try conclunep* over a mile and a half. Tie .0. *• Fisher Plate, run at standard weight lor age, has always been a popular race •* Flemington, and, although fielde are invariably smoU, the event never fails to have attention. Betting naturally favoured Artilleryman, which wee at odds. Many of the bookmakere, to (accommodate the public, made deuDM books on the Plate and the Final Handicap, and in this way did a good volume of business. Lewis again hod the mount jpn Artilleryman, Wood piloted Cetigae. went out half a length at the outset, and at the turn was * length to the good- This he increawd to two lengths along the river side, increasing it slightly at the abattoirsEntering the straight the colt came away and won easily by three lengths. The time, 2.32J, was three<juarters of a second outside the course record.

The feat of K. Bradfteld in turning out from his stable the three placed horeee in the Caulfield Cup hae never tefor* been accomplished in connection with m | important race in Australia, says a li*' , bourne writer. There have been several caßes of one stable providing the fire* and eecond—the Caulfield Cup of 1907, in which Poseidon just beat Apolqgee , . (!both trained by the late I. Eanehaw); the Melbourne Cup of 1897, in *W<* Gaulus beat by a narrow margin The Grafter (both trained by the late~Wil> liam Forrester); and the Melbourne Cup of 1900, in which Clean Sweep won from Malster (both trained by Jamee Scobie), to mention but three instances. Scobie started four in that Melbourne CupClean Sweep, Malster, La Carabine, and ■The Bride —and they were all near tt«.. front coining to the nome turn. I# Carabine finished seventh, and The Bride a long way farther back. In the Victoria Derby of 1906 horses trained by ScoMe * ran first (F.J.A.)', second (Sweet Ndl), and fourth (Emir). Th e most remarkaMe record of this kind, however, was in , connection with a minor event—a nurBery handicap—at Kosehill (X.S.VV.) in 1801, when five horses were started froe T. Payten's stable, viz., Donation, Autonomy, Arquebus, Warpaint, and The Beetori and they finished at the head of **• i field in. that order.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19191122.2.106

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume L, Issue 278, 22 November 1919

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1,131

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume L, Issue 278, 22 November 1919

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