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TURF NOTES.

(By WfiAfcEBONE.)

Light has foaled a colt to The Welkin at Mr. E. E. D. Clarke's siai, in Victoria. The foal is a to ■Gloaming and Refraction; a two-year-old -

filly in J. Scobie's stable.

Young racing stock by The Tetrarcli continue to bring very high, pricee at the English yearling sales. Follorwing on the sale of a colt iby that eir6 for 8,000 guineas, a filly by The Tetrareh from Venane was sold by auction for 5,100 guineas.

According to a Reuter message from New York, a new world's trotting record for four-year-old geldings has been established. Echo Direct won the third heat of a 2.7 class contest by covering the mile in 25i. The trotting record for the distance is 1.58. The virtue of the performance of Echo Direct lies in the fact that he Won his third heat in the time mentioned. Trotting races in America are conducted differently from what they are in this part of the world. In America a trotter may have to gain iive out of seven heats before ho can win a big stake.

In the way of bad luck llr. C. T. Garland, an English owner, had a remarkable experience at Lihgfield in July. His 'horse Silvester (a 20 to 1 chance) beat Sheriff's Officer a head in the Summer plate, and then a protest was entered against the winner. While ■waiting for the stewards' decision, Mr. Garland was standing near Silvester, •who lashed out and broke his owner's leg. A few minutes later it was announced that the stewards had upheld the protest., and the loes of a race and a broken leg in one afternoon should have about filled Mr. Garland's cup of woe to overflowing.

I have seen all the two-year-olds that have been out so far, and I have no hesitation in picking Tetratema as the best, says an English writer. It is a great pity, however, that Major McCalmont has chosen such an ugly name for his colt, especially as we had already a Tetrameter, of the same age, trained in the same stable, and belonging to his relative, Sir Hugh McCalmont. Moreover, the name Tetrameter has a meaning, while Tetratenia has not. There is bound to be confusion over the two names. If all the sons and daughters of The Tetrarch are to be given names commencing with "Tetra," it will be worei than the array of "Suns" descended from Sunstar. Very little originality or ingenuity is shown in modern nomehclature. When shall we get another happy name like Yard Arm, given to the produce of Buccaneer out of Conviction?

The Sledmere yearlings sold at the Doneaster sales in. England realised an aggregate of £61,300, which is a. record for one stud. The Swynford—Blue Tib colt sold to Lord Glanely brought 11,500 guineas. There ■was great excitement ■when the bidding passed the previous yearling record of 10,000 guineas paid Cor Sceptre. Another Swynford colt realised 6,300 guineas, and a filly by. the came sire 5,100 guineas. Yearlings by The Tetrarch continued in great demand, a filly Sy that eire bringing 6,000 guineas, and two colts 5,000 guineas and 3,700 guineas respectively. A colt by Prince Palatine was sold for 5,000 guineas, a filly by Santoi at the same figure, and a colt by Bayardo at 4:100 guineas. The aggregate amount realised by the sales was £223,000 —an.average of 071 guineas for each yearling. Both ; these totals constitute records.

The prices for young iorees in England are soaring higher than ever. The latest record to go is Sceptre's which has stood since July, 1900. Sceptre as a yearling realised 10,000 guineas at the late Duke of Westminster's sale, when Cupbearer was knocked down to the new Duke of Westminster for 9100 guineas. Mr. Sievier secured a great bargain in Sceptre, which won him the Oaks Stakes, St. Leger Stakes, and other important events, and was eventually sold for £25.000. Cupbearer was a failure as a racehorse. Orcus, the highest priced yearling in Australia, did not succeed in winning a race. The following list of some high-priced yearlings may be of interest:— EXGLAXD. Colt, by Swynford from Blue Tit 11,500 Filiy (Sceptre), by Persimmon from Ornament 10009 Colt (Cupbearer), fey Onne from Kiss- ' ing Cup 9 iOO •Colt, jjjr The Tetrarcft from Lisina" 8.000 Colt, to- Prince Palatine from Bock Garden , 6300 Colt, by ■S'wynford ; , fisno Filly, by The Tetrarch .". 6,000 AUSTRALIA. Colt (Orcus), by Positano from Jacinth 3 050 iCoit (Lord Rudolph), by Xewniiihster from Primrose 2 300 Colt ('Havoc), by ■Xordenfeldc from ................;.. f> 200 Colt (Calaverite), by Graitoii" from 'Gold Dust •> joQ Colt (Duke James), by Maltster frdm ~" Laay Graf ton "100 In commenting on the recent Conference in Melbourne, on the "Tod Sloan" seat, a writer in the "Australasian" says:—lt is to be hoped that no attempt will be made to interfere with experienced jockeys who ride in the "Tod bloan" style—that would be a retrograde step—but possibly eomething may be done with a view to keeping young" apprentices from adopting the style in races until properly taught to sit and control a horse. It was admitted by more than one trainer that all boys could not be got to obey instructions even on the tracks in regard to the length of their stirrups. One apprentice nding in a race at Fiemington a few weeks ago raised his stirrups (after being mounted under the eye of his employer) on reaching the starting post. He knew better—or thought he did—than the tramer what length he should ride. An experienced rider must undoubtedly be allowed to be the judge in this matter, but trainers should report to the V.R.C. Committee all apprentices who disober instructions in the direction indicated, whether in a race or on the track. Some boys are smarter than others in acquiring horsemanship, but. after all. their future success largely depends on a good pounding. The matter is really in the hands of the trainers themselves. They rTV' ake the trou Me to instruct their lads how to ride, and not merely expect them to '-pick up" the business! Such boys O f ten « pick up ,, tJje bad ratherthan the good points of riding. No apprentice, or jockey in the making, should be flowed to ride "short" in .V race until he 13 thoroughly experienced. If such a ru e were observed there wo\ild undoubtedly be less interference in raws. The conditions of some races confined to apprentices prohibit the use of a whip. Another condition might be added to the effect that no jockey in a race contoed to apprentices be permitted if* ride snort.'

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19191004.2.120.6

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume L, Issue 236, 4 October 1919

Word Count
1,104

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume L, Issue 236, 4 October 1919

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