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POLICE COURT.

i * I (Before Mr. J. K. Wilson. S.M.) ! DRUNKENNESS. I William James Taylor (21), admitted I,avi ' n disorderly while drunk. Hβ had j;ot mi a train in Queen Street, and the conductor had declined to allow him [ to ride hecause of liis condition, with the result that lie mad,, a fuss, wanted i to light the conductor, and had eventu- _ ally to lie taken in charge !i\- a policeI man. He was lined to/-, in dc'fault tlm-e ■ days' imprisonment. A first offender for til-unkennel was convicted and discharged. GAVE IT A GO. Henry Connor (33), a (teaman, who had put up a fight wlh.ii arrested in Queen Street last night for drunkenness, was charged that lie was drunk, resisted I arrest, used ou.see.u language, and damaged the constable's trousers. He had made a bi X fight of it when arrested doing his best to throw tlie constable. J appealing <o the crowd in indecent terms. and the bout lasted for about twenty i ' minutes, while a bijj crowd looked oil. I and. in some eases, interfered before the constable handcuffed his man. In the ■ I wrestle the constable burst one of the ■ knees of his trousers on the pavement.

Accused was sentenced to seven days' hard labour.

! HIS BAD ENGLISH •| Ami row Hnoki (21). n native in uni ' form, when lie was drunk yesterday ufter noon, got into a tramcar ami insisted on , standing with the motorman in the ririv- . inj; l>ox. Ho would not shift till ii , policeman was called, and then lie threw . down his hat and did :i hnkn round the policeman, but unfortunately for him he , used some bad Knglish in his war-sons, land was promptly arrested for publicly . ' using obscene phrasos. , I lie was advised to stand clear of stroii" , I drink and trench lan<:iia<re in future, and hfld the caution emphasised with a fine . ! of £5.

AT THE END OF THE REMIT. '"He is a remittance man with an ineonie of £75 a yftir, but ho always spends his money in a big burst when he gets it." stated Senior-sergeant MeXamara of Alfred Aslienden (02), obviously a man of some education, who was charged with drunkenness and begging alms. A constable stated that yesterday he noticed accused, when under the influence of drink, stop a man who gave him a pipe of tobacco, anil then accost another man, who seemed to turn him down. A third man was stopped, and when he shook his head accused remarked. "You're not Bill Mnssey." and made a smack at him. Witness ascertained that he had askeil the first man for some tobacco, and the other two for money. The Seniorsergeant added that Aahenden had been on the Island, but was still addicted to drink, though ho managed to keep all right so long as he was out of town away from associates who took advantage of his weakness. Accused was prohibited, convicted and ordered to come up for sentence if called on within six months. AN EXPENSIVE OPINION. Lawrence Manning (24), wlio had accosted a military policeman in Queen Street and told him his opinion of "Redcap." s using obscene language in the course of his diatribe, was fined £5 f or the language.

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POLICE COURT. Auckland Star, Volume L, Issue 133, 5 June 1919

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