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RELIGIOUS WORLD.

THE CHURCH IS FIGHTING FOR ITS LITE. "The war is not alone a military ■battle, but a moral and religious battle as well," says an editorial in the "'San Francisco Chronicle." These Prussian standards of conscienceless materialism, brutality and immorality are the most revolting to the human conscience that have ever appeared among men. "They must be trampled and destroyed in their ignominy, and those who profess them must be disgraced and undone for the sake of the world. '" If Prussianrsm should triumph in this war, then Christian standards are undone, if the Hun prevails the Church is smitten a deadly blow. " Therefore, the Church is fighting for its life—the Catholic Church, the Presbyterian Church, the Baptist, the Methodist, the Episcopalian and the Jewish churches—arc all in a life and death struggle, which hangs upon the discomfiture of Germany." CHURCH NEWS AND NOTES. Rev. Watson, vicar of St. Peter's Church, Wellington, will leave as chaplain on a hospital ship shortly The Rev. P. J. and Mrs. Murdoch, of Melbourne, have the honour of two sons serving with the Australian Imperial Forces, and each has been awarded a. Military Cross. Over £77,000 was Taiscd by annual collections for the British Red Cross Fund in churches of all denominations in Great Britain last year. The previous 12 months' total was £45,000. The Rev. M. A. Rugby Pratt, of Hastings, having accepted a call to Trinity Methodist Church, Dunedin, the Rev. Angus Mcßean has been called to fill the vacancy. These changes cannot take place until ratified by Conference next year. The Rev. Cyprian Well, vicar of the Anglican Church, Winton, for the past seven years, has just been the recipient of a substantial cheque from his congregation as a mark of appreciation of faithful duty done. Dr. J. Hilton Stawell, formerly Congregational Minister at Lavender Hill, Clapham, but who was ordained a priest of the Church of England, has been appointed by the Bishop of Manchester to the newly-created vicarage of St. Lawrence, at Morecambe. The Rev. Henry Steele Craik, who left this week for Sydney, resigned Mount Eden Congregational Church over a year ago to go out to the front as a chaplain. He came to Auckland aftei leaving College in England, and was for three years in charge of Beresford Street Congregational Church.

Few developments at home during the I ■war, states the "Christian World," have attracted more attention than the rapid rise to patrician rank and the notable part played in out national affairs by members of one particular family, viz., Sir Eric Geddes, M.P., First Lord of the Admiralty, Sir Auckland Geddes, M.P., Minister for National Service, and their sister, Mrs- Chalmers Watson, M.D.. C.8.E., until recently Chief Controller of the W.A.A.C., and first woman graduate of medicine in Edinburgh University. They are the grandsons and granddaughter of the late' Rev. Alexander Anderson, D.D., a former minister of Crown Terrace Baptist Church, Aberdeen.

An American lady, whose name is •withheld, was a few days ago surprised in the act of glueing a slip of paper on the toe of the bronze statue of St. Peter in the church of the same name at Rome (says the Rome correspondent of the "Daily News"). The paper bore the following inscription in English and Italian:-—"From the Teutonic plague, O Lord, deliver us." Asked for an explanation by the police commissioner, the lady said that her object was to provide a prayer for the faithful who came to kiss the toe of the saint. The police commissioner, while praising the patriotic intentions of the lady, exacted from her a promise that she would not again tamper with St. Peter's toe, but would use other means of propaganda.

Dr. James Cannon, jun., of Richmond, Virginia, chairman of the National Legislative Committee of the Anti-Saloon League of America, and Dr. Moore, vicechairman of the committee, have arrived in England to study the question of the destruction of food material in the manufacture of alcoholic liquors. In a chat with a representative of the "Christian World" they said there was a, very uneasy feeling in the Prohibition States, which were called on to observe •Vheatless days," so as to supply wheat to feed the British people, over the continued using up of cereals for drink production. There was even talk of refusing to supply wheat for export if the present food destruction went on.

"Public Opinion" (London) had the following regarding the bombarding of Paris on Good Friday:—

"The Kaiser at- "On Good Fritended service on day, at the veryGood Friday in a hour of the death church within the of our Lord Jesus fighting zone. It Christ a was a deeply im- shell fell on one of pressive hour when our churches, and the German war- the vaulted roof riors assembled in collapsed. There are the presence of at least 75 killed their Supreme War and 90 injured, who Lord to listen to for the most part the reading of the are women and Passion story as Children." — Carditold in the Gospel" nal Ainette, Arch■—"Lokal Anzeiger." bishop of Paris.

Elder Amasa Morse, who died on March 14. 1918, at Stafford Springs, Ct., would have been 104 years of age had he lived till May. He" had been in good health up to "his 100 th birthday. He was the oldest man in Connecticut. To abstinence from alcohol and tobacco he attributed his long life. Born in Union, Ct., May S. 1814, he spent the greater part of his life in that town. In 1834 he joined the Adventist denomination. He was ordained as an elder in 1842, and preached for nearly 00 yearsHis last sermon was preached at the Advent camp grounds in Springfield in August 1913. Elder Morse bore the distraction of being the oldest living legislator in Connecticut. In 1800 he served a term in the Legislature, which met that year in New Haven. I n 1861 At Tw l!lee^ d ' 6erVing in Hartford. At that time it was customary to hold the Legislature m New Haven one year and in Hartford the next. He possessed a remarkably strong, clear voice that served him well in both preaching 'and l political speaking. When three month. after his 100U, birthday he spoke at the Advent Christian camp meeting „ Springfield on July 31, 1014, his brief address was heard in the remotest parts of the huge tent. P

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19180622.2.112

Bibliographic details

RELIGIOUS WORLD., Auckland Star, Volume XLIX, Issue 148, 22 June 1918

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1,066

RELIGIOUS WORLD. Auckland Star, Volume XLIX, Issue 148, 22 June 1918

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