Default

Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

YOUNG MAN'S SUICIDE.

BODY- FOUXD IX HOTEL. T, An inquest into the cirei™.* the death of a young EngSafe° f Gordon Francis Kitson, °71§§--who was found dead in hkvoo'mltX' 1 Commercial Hotel yesterday ZnL- h ■was held by Mr. F. V. Frazer, morning. "■•"-i-hub Evidence was given by Mr. J. F arra , assistant manager of "the CoJL ■?*■ Hotel,, that the dccLrf hotel at 5.45 p.m. on Tuesday andhooV , a room At 7.15 the porter called fe ness, who went to the room 'occupied it I deceased, and found him lying on ,? floor. Witness instructed the^oS? I lock the door and he then telepho^i | lor the police and a doctor. Mr. A. J. Parker, analyst, stated- tW he received a bottle, glass, and ta.k I from Constable Hargreaves for examiT tion. He made a search for a tube and found one in the area below the Wiafevj lit was labelled '-poison." Apparently. the had been thrown out of the'win low. Witness analysed the contents-q' .the tube, which he found to be a ; tle'aaiv | poison. There was sufficient'left ir lie tube to kill ten persons. It -was.a raw i poison, known only to medical -men. Judging from the appearance of the-label 'witness would say that deceased had car- | ried it about with him for some "tune and possibly brought it from England (•with him, as he doubted if it was ootaiaiable in Auckland. The poison was of no medicinal value in ordinary use; it wis solely used for preparing other -medicines. Witness did not think any sane person would carry it about with him.

Dr. S. A. Stride, who conducted a post-mortem examination, stated taat.s'l the organs were healthy with the exception of the heart, which was'in a state.ot collapse. The appearance of the ; btirly was consistent -with death from-paisoiv-io-g.

Walter Hutchinson, assistant.secfetaiof the V.M.C.A., said he-had;known "deceased for about four.months. He was a medical student, and had been in New Zealand since February. He came;from the Islands. Witness had been keeping a friendly eye on deceased for : some -time. 'He waa very erratic in his condact,-"and drink was the principal cause • of-."his I trouble. Deceased had said that : thi I cause of his downfall had been two mscrupulous women, who had dragge3~Mm I down. He drank very hard, and inciirrel heavy liabilities. Witness also said'coi one occasion that if money that-:he>*ysi expecting did not arrive he would commit suicide. Deceased w,a6 a remittance man, and came from an old 'English family. A verdict was returned that the cause of death was suicide by poisonings selfadministered while in a state of depression.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
430

YOUNG MAN'S SUICIDE. Auckland Star, Volume XLVIII, Issue 183, 2 August 1917

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working