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TURF NOTES.

(By WHALEBONE.) The Victorian horseman, F. Bullock, piloted Sir A. Bailey's China Blue, by Dark Konald, the winner of the Newmarket Oaks. A position on the committee of the A.J.C. is not by any means an easy one, for recenty they sat for six and a-half (hours considering the business which had ' accumulated since the previous monthly l meeting. Among the decisions arrived at was one to forward to Mr. A. Knox, who is still in Egypt, a further £1500 of the money voted by the club for patriotic purposes. Though Jockey F. Bullock is again in Australian waters, he has not, it is said come to practise his profession permanently. Opportunities of earning large sums of money in England are stili plentiful, and Bullock will, it is said, return in time for the opening of next season. There has been a rumour to the effect that rating in England was to be suspended entirely next year, but it is probably without foundation. I The field of 31 that faced the barrier ■for the Cesarewitch at Newmarket in October was the largest since Duke of j Parma won in a field of 36 in 1875. Mr.| Newman's Snow Marteu was a slightly ( •better favourite than Sir Thomas, but l both finished behind Sir A. Bailey's Son-in-law, by Dark Ronald from Mother-in-law, by Matchmaker, which started third favourite, and was steered by the Melbourne horseman, F. Bullock. Lord Rosebery has not made any' secret a≤ to his desire to , see the racing '■ carried on during the currency of the ' war. He has as many horses in train- j ing as usual, and a few weeks ago added '13 yearlings, to the number, of which seven were 6eut to F. Hartigan to prepare, and sis to P. Peck. They represent Swynford, Loehrvan, Cicero, Sunstar, Gow, Fo'wlingpiece, and Santrr, and were bred by his lordship. ■ •:■•' The Champion Stakes, run at Xewmarket (Eng.) in October, brought out a field of five, and Silver Tag, owned by the Manchester sportsman, Mr. E. Hutton, was sent out a warm favourite. The son of Sundridge acted up to expectations, but a protest on the ground of boring and bumping was upheld, and the race ■was awarded to Colonel Hall-Walker's colt, Let Fly, by White Eagle from Gonddlette, by Loved One, which was bred by his owner. The first of imported Bronzino's progeny gained the winning list in Sydney i recently, when Bruck secured the Nursery Handicap at Moorefield. A week, before, on the Canterbury Park track, Bruck was beaten by a head by Blue Shot, who had 31b less to carry, but on this.. occasion the positions were reversed and Blue Shot had 41b more than hie opponent. Again the finish was fought out between the pair over the last three furlongs, and both finishing with great gameness Bronzino's son scored by a very narrow margin. A Brisbane paper is responsible for saying that it was noticeable, on inspecting the horses in their stalls at the Ascot racecourse, that a few of them had a knot of jed ribbon tied to their throat, straps. The same unusual decoration is to be observed on some horses used about the streets of the city. It seems that the ribbon 3 Tiave been affixed with the object of coenbating the botfiv and other dipterous insects, which irritate! and infect horses at this time of the year. The plan usually followed is to steep the ribbon in kerosene, the chemical properties of which are calculated to keep the pests away. The wholesale exportation of blood stock from England, chiefly to America and Australasia, brought about in a great measure by the curtailment of racing, appears to be worrying some English turf authorities, and apparently none more so than "The Special Commissioner," who is himself a breeder. In a Tecently-arrived issue of London "Sportsman," that writer opens out in no unmistakable language on what he describes as the very critical stage in the evolution of the British thoroughbred, and says it is almost certain that the Home stock will be decimated by American, and colonial buyers if no further step is taken,' and that quickly, to reassure breeders and owners as to the continuance of racing. In normal times the presence of American and colonial commissions in the English market is looked for by "The Special Commissioner" and others: in point of fact, it is liberally canvased for, but-with racing curtailed they seem to anticipate that many breeders and owners will allow their- slock to be so depleted that the horse industry cannot avoid being ruined for some years to come. They can oulv continue in the business at a loss, and that, it is understood, many cannot afford to do.- , .English writers still quote from Sloan'3 Jbookj and in it he admits that his ■ successes "ended in that serious complaint, 'swollen head,'" and he does not hesitate to admit having ridden a bad race, for instance, on Sibola for the Oaks:— "We got to the post, and there were two or tiiree false breaks. 1 must admit, • that 1 was trying to beat the starter, ' and he didn't half give it to mc for what I was doing. At lost he let them go, with mc not ready and left standing. I was mad with rage, and in my furious temper I did what I had always told young boys never to attempt. It was the waist race I ever xode in my life, and never shall I forgive mself for allowing j my vexation to overcome my better judgment. I made up all the lost ground going up the toll, and when I got to the ■top Sibola was a tired mare. I ought to have allowed a mile to Tecover the distance I had lost at the post, and then we couldn't have lost. Certainly I got a steadier at her a little time afterwards, and Madden on Musa and I rode a desperate finish. After we passed the post and got down to the paddock to turn back to scale Madden ea,id tome 1 think you won it, Tod.' and T was sure I bad. We were both surprised when Musa's number was seen in the frame . . I wonder Lord W.lV.am Bereeford took it so well. The whole cause of my losing that race is summarised in the ono Word, Temper."

j Says an English writer:—From having I been thought a champion Black Jester has become a degenerate. One day he will go like a lion at exercise, another can hardly be persuaded to put one leg before the other. • ' The "Special Commissioner" of the English "Sportsman" has authority for : stating that Mr. J. B. Joel has sold ten of his best yearlings and some of his two- ! year-olds, inclusive of Star Hawk, to an American buyer. i Among the many English horses which were purchased quite recently in England by American owners was The Curragh, by Spearmint, from Currajong. He was bought for Mr. Saniord for 1,50Cg3. Wrack, by Robert le Diable, from Sapphire, was also purchased for America. During the whole of this year's sales in England, American owners have bought lavishly, in order to make up for "the curtailment of their slock caused by the anti-betting laws, which practically killed horse-racing in New York and elsewhere, some years ago. The "Breeders' Review" quotes some figures to show how the war affooted the price of yearlings. These are I they:- j I Lota I . I I — 1 Sold, I Total. I'AYge. lsioT I -M 7 I 02.174 i StF 1008 i IMS I 82.050 I 881} jIOOD ! 213 91.770 I 430} lniO iTI 93,305 344j I Jnil . . 29S 113.553 SSI I lu i2 304 130,070 4»31 1013 "' 321 221,408 690 10H 2-f 54 > Sl6 24!) IJUS J'.. I 260 81,178 100 A peculiar case, associated with the race meeting which the Bendigo Jockey Club handled at Moonee Valley last week,; jis reported in Melbourne "Age." The I case is unique owing to the nature ol J i the "evidence" which was admitted by I I the stewards, apparently at the request, of some persons concerned. It appears that an inquiry was opened at the j course ou the day of the meeting into j the running of Applique in the Epsom j Plato, and resumed two days later at i the V.R.C. office, Mr. S. Lazard, presi-j dent of the Bendigo Club, acting with the stipendiary stewards. The following decision was arrived at, says the "Age": | "P. J. Bartley, E. S. Grace (rider), and i the brown gelding Applique to jC disqualified for two years each for dishonourable action in connection with the running of Applique in the Plate at | Moonee Valley on November 24." It is j understood that the disqualification | was practically agreed upon by the j stewards at the course, but in conse- j quence of a suggestion that the horse' had a habit of "hanging" badly, and i racing with his head elevated, it was j agreed to allow bim to have a trial gal-1 lop at Caulfield in the presence of two ' lof the stewards. The gallop, in which \ the gelding was ridden by R. Whicker,' was apparently not convincing enough, i and the disqualifications, as stated, were I imposed. An appeal is. it is stated, to be lodged with the V.R.C. committee. A Xew York writer says that a firstclaes trotter in America is practically ; valueless. What is the limit of speed that a harness horse can show? Twenty years ago those who predicted . that a two-minute trotter was a certainty of the future, and that pacere , would travel well under that mark were considered a bit feeble-minded. Yet to-day there are many two-minute .trotters and a number of trotters who covered a mile in less than two , minutes. , Directum I. the whirlwind pacer, set I the harness world aghast just a few days ,j ago when he travelled a mile in Syracuse , in lmin oSJsec, without a wind shield—a ( new world's record. Twenty ycare ago . such a feat was considered absolutely , impossible. Each year brings newer and more wonderful performances in the trotting game, and it would not be surprising if there should be bred within the next generation spme pacers and trotters that i will npgotiate a mile in lmin 30sec. [ Impossible, you say? Well, that's what \ was said 20 years ago when the twominute trotter was predicted. One of the ironies of the harness game 1 is that the faster a horse becomes the more his earning power decreases. It seems odd that it should work out that j way—but it docs In the running department of horse I racing the result is entirely different. The speedier the horse the more money he can make for his owners, because in r the running game a whirlwind can run in the same races with "dub" horses, \ provided that he carries enough extra j weight to supposedly overcome the advantage he lias over the other entries. The trotting game, however, brings * about the reverse condition. The faster the horse becomes the fewer classes he ; can enter, and if he speeds up to eomewhere near the two-minute mark there is nothing left for him but an occasional j match against one or two of the other horses in his record-smashing class. 7 The harness authorities place a premium on the "green" animals—and ' practically rule off the turf a horse that is a record 'holder. The owner of a horse that never ran a race in better than ' 2.15 or 2.20 can campaign him, and, if he ! is successful, win from 5000dol to ■ j '15,000d0l a year in purses. Yet horses j like Directum I, Peter Vole, Lee Ax--1 worthy, William, and the other wonders, , hardly earn their keep. The wonderful Uhlan, owned by C. K. , Billings, is a striking example. As a "green" youngster, Uhlan won many ' purses and enriched his owners. The I older he got the speedier he became— - and the fewer the purses that he won. . Soon he reached tie point where he was . the peer of all the trotters in the world. ! What happened? Did Uhlan bring home to Billings some bulky purses? No. , Lou Dillon, as an earner, was through. Tbere were no horses for him to run i against. He was in a class by himself. And although Uhlan two yeare ago wae practically at the crest of his career, he was retired from the sulky and became a saddle horse. Those who predicted that William, the sterling pacer owned by Billings, would some day be the greatest pacer in the game —point to his recent accomplishI 1 raenta in Syracuse, when he travelled a ' j mile, to wagon, in lmin 59§see, with an ( ' amateur driver. It was Billings himself who handled the leins, and after the J record-smashing performance Billings said that he was sure William had not C reached his greatest epeed—that he 1 would continue to improve.

The old record was 2min and '.t endured for many years. Many horses and many drivers tried to emash it, yet William, in his first real attempt, lowered the mark two full seconds.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19151211.2.120.1

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XLVI, Issue 295, 11 December 1915

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2,201

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XLVI, Issue 295, 11 December 1915

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