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SPORT ABROAD.

, ' '; THE TURF. p . - a "(FroniOurSpeii.il Correspondent.) „,' — :l LONDON. November 3. v 'Tic Turf is continuing to lose, among officers killed, good sportsmen, who were much interested in racing. This applies (our racing correspondent, "Centaur.'' cl jfrites) to Captain Charrington, of the ? jskKorals. He used to ride a good deal in. India, and he has figured in the 'saddle in England, both on the flat and . dter fences. Then young Palmer, who " had recently joined the "Jnd Life Ciuards, U las fallen "in action. When at Cam- v bridse he was Master of the Drag and c .' captain oi the polo team. He won races L 1 atthe 'Varsity Grind, and last National Hunt season he would ride his own ° horse. Extinguisher, in small steeplechases. He was very keen in riding °. cwr fences, and a line sportsman in erery way. . Events on the Turf have been charged b ■with much interest since last writing, j. IJms at Sandown Park Sir E. Cassel's j Hapsbarg was beaten for the Sandown t , Toil Stakes, a well-endowed event, by Q Jfr. L. Neumann's Lanius. The latter v enjoyed a big advantage in the weights, \ for Hapsburg carried full penalties by t ) reason, of his Eclipse Stakes victory. Six furlongs from borne Hapsburg inter- a jered with both Lanius and Peter the 0 Hermit, and the success of Lanius was ; distinctly meritorious in the circuni- t 'stances. A sequel was forthcoming ]■ vhen the jockeys of the winner and w -Peter the Hermit lodged a complaint a against Foy, the rider of Hapsburg, for I foul riding. He was suspended for the t meeting, and reported to the stewards j of the Jockey Club. This week, at New- f market, the senior stewards suspended t inn-until November 14. a . -Xta the following day the Sapling 0 Hate for two-year-olds was made par- a iicularly interesting by reason of the i rivalry of Lord Carnarvon's Volta and t lord Michelhanvs smart filly Plucky Liege, formerly inaptly named Lucky a liege. The colt had to concede 61b. but, j though there were many strong believers c hvlim, the filly was nevertheless favour- [ tie. It was a pretty race between the ; two, but Volta was the first to surrender, and.Plucy Liege, a filly by Spearmint of |) great charm and speed, won cleverly by t ahead. The third day of the meeting at Sandown was given up to National Hunt j sport, which hardly calls for notice just c yet. There was sufficient vigour in it, j torever, to suggest that it will go on r during the winter. -, The last of the Newmarket meetings , j for tie year opened on Tuesday of tills j wsk; there being a remarkably good j attendance and capital sport. Hapsburg t ajfei Lanins were in opposition again { for-the Limekiln Stakes, and as the fanner was meeting his rival on 141b , tefter terms, he was brought right in,to , tie: argument.- Lanius; however, beat ( - Mm again, but was himself tackled by ; tie only other runner, who -won. This , tos Mr Luscombe's Arda, who had filled j third place in the Cesarewiteh. It was t surprising to find her show this speed in a race of a mile and a quarter, but the explanation may be that she does not ( properly stay a Cesarewitch course. Mr ( James Buchanan whose colours are not , so-often successful as they ought to be. commensurate with the biir sums he has spent in bloodstock, won two races. His ! ttre?-year-old filly William's Bride, by I William the Third, won the Rutland ! Handicap of a mile and a half, and Wise , &ymon. secured the Fordham Welter j \ Handicap of five furlongs, the winner in I each ease being well backed. .Sunfire; siowed himself a good colt when iie won j ' the Criterion Stakes, and he may make a "ally high class three-vear-o!d. " Costello under 8.11 won the Old Nursery. of a ' mite tor Mr Bower Ismay. the perform- ! ance being quite a smart one. " ' Another surprise in a big handicap! ' who won the Cambridgeshire | ' « WO to 7. was unfancied by his owner, j : ib-Solly Joel, and his trainer. Charles ! «*. consequent n n having made a poor ; toow ior the Duke of York Stakes at !' a-erapton Park. On that running he had <■ ' *>r instance, lOIb the worst oi the argu-! : wnt imh Diadumenos. Between the!' Ambassador (in Mr Donald I 'lasers coloursi and Honeywood there , ' *fs a thrilling race in the last furlon-. \' Ate latter was leading out of Abingdon 1 wp, and he just managed to retain it to I to by a head from Ambassador, with we other horse a head aw.iv. third The frTOnrite. Sun Vat. in Mr" J. B. Joel's "taw, did badly, as also did that over's St. Leger winner Black Jester. £ i<l, nee is that the three-year-olds ~iL "fi art " not of much c,ass " dps P ite ™ am and second in this handicap Ming of that age. Perhaps it is worth mentioning a curious coinc i dence that cantilever, who won the Cambridgeshire r ' a -° for Lo! "d Harewood. who num"erM 13 on the card. Honeywood was aot only --13"' on thp eard> bl " lt he drew «*t number in the draw for places at c start. Archeiaus, who won the pulton Stakes for Sir R. Waldie GrifS"^ s a grey son of Roi Herode, sire of •ine letrarcli. and not unlike him. except. « co urse , that he is not endowed with his S^ iehed rela tive's wonderful speed, '-"'i. he can gallop, and as he is built ™ a big scale, he should furnish into a arable three-year-old. Lord Durham en.two race., on this same afternoon, »°Hi vrith two-year-olds. His best winner was Lux, who won the New Nursery ~7. a fter a pretty race with Mr •"nrtons Dragoman (8.61 FOOTBALLERS SACRIFICES. A pistol is being held at the heads "itiioie footballers— moet or" them are *'.t«ued to wealthy First League clubs— *1, if as to whether they fwuia a?ree to t - J)e nropose{l re d uct i on f weir trages. Frankly they have been J°itt that i! thej- Tefusc to* ac-cept the «?gnee relief scheme they Hill imperil - "eir contracts of next season. The objeetore are few, and their protests, thouch ™»ac jnth undoubted sincerity, are mild. i?«-chief has come from the"Tottenham •hotspur men, w i, o point out that they a M other players in London will suffer fairly as compared with collcaaues in we provinces, owing to the higher cost W living in London. One of the con"lUons of the League scheme ie that contracts between club and ?«7er should be torn up and frech ones a feed to. This has been another eauee β-metion, .and one c;iq undersUind the fajection of the men. They say that c monc? is deducted from their" wages should be regarded as a voluntary grant. There is just one aspect of the fitter that is not nice. The pi ay era are

being asked to ? houlder nearfy all the burden of cacrilieos that circumstances. demand/ The avowed object oE the relief scheme i≤ to help needy clubs and players, but it seems as if all the clubs are to benefit, to some extent. At the same time, it fe-admitted that some are getting gates VWcll will ensure a profit at the end of the ,-ea.son. and it seems unfair that the members of these should have their wagt* reduced. The matter is complex, and bristling with difficulties, but thexe is no, "doubt that it will be settled without ,>any serious quarrel in a way the League authorities believe to be best and suitable.

-Manchester City now elainj the distinction of being the. only undefeated club in the three thief Leagues, but they only managed to divide their home "match with Middlesborough.and are experiencing a de.il of diiliculty in drawing away from their rivak at."the top of the table. Changes which have-: always appeared necessary have at last been'made in the forward line, but still, there is a shortage of goals. Browell. who was known as the "boy wonder" when at the age of IS he was transferred from Hull eitv to Manchester at a fee of £1.000. has been restored to the attack; but there is still a lack of penetrative power. The defence remains splendidly strong, aud to this fact is to l>e ascribed the" side's exalted position in the -competition. It was a little curious, too, that Sheffield only secured one point for their home fixture with-Blackburn Rovers, but the latter, despite their rather in and out form, strike one as being capable of carrying of! the championship, as lasl reason. For fifteen years or more. Crompton. the Rover's captain, has been England's best right back, and ho is still without a riv.il in the position. He has already appeared in two representative League contests this season, aud shown that he still possesses the physical powers to enable him to utilise to the full his judgment'and'experience. Cronipton has broken all records for Le.uiue as well as international appearances, but one honour excapes .hijn. He cannot gain a cup winner's medal* That, of course. is more the fault of/ihe team he leads than his own. - : Manchester United have taken drastic action against their unruly players. Following the trouble which rose alter the suspension of Turnbull, it was decided to suspend Meredith and Hunter indefinitely, which means until they are prepared to obey orders. Meanwhile, Meredith has approached the League authorities with a vie.v to getting them to inquire into his case, and Hunter has asked to be placed on the transfer list. Meredith lias got no satisfaction, his request being refused; but if the club agree to release Hunter, who has been with Aston Villa, Oldham and Chelsa within three years, there will be no surprise. The United had an unhappy experience at Evcrton. They let by two goals at halitime, and then }ost four in the second half. London's representatives continue to flounder at the bottom of the tournament: ' Chelsa shows signs of some Improvement! and -really deserved to beat Oldham; "but the weaknesses of Tottenham" Hotspur •were exjioscd" Tery unfriendly way by A>ton Villa, whose football 'is superb. There was one individual feat of high merit. This was the =eorin<; of three goals by Philip, the voung~S.underl.ind recruit, against Notts County. The North of England Club have discovered a centre-forward of great promise. The Arsenal have held the leadership of the Second League for five weeks, but i they have now had to give way to Hud- ! dersfield, a team of surprising strength. The London Club came a mighty fall at Derby, losing all four goals in the second I half." They had only one excuse: Buck- ! ley was unable to play at centre-half. I But it would be an injustice to Sands, J the deputy, to suggest that his weakne" I was responsible ior the bad beating the team suffered. Sand>, who is a schoolmaster, and wa~ thought of for international honours a* an amateur, has been with the club since the days of long I ago at Woolwich. Though now a proies- ! sional footballer. Tie continues as a I teacher. Hi* appearance in the team at 1 Derby was the fir-t this season. The j other London sides. Fulham and Clapton j Orient, have not fulfilled their early proi miue. and they provide the only importj Rut change in the positions of the clubs. j Form is now becoming "■known" and I fairly stable, and teams are beginning \to sort themselves out. but it would be ' wrong to think that the present state of i the t;rble is anything like fixed. f>ueI picion must hang over Huddcrsfiekl. Can they keep it up? It is far more difficult to head the table in January than in October, and »o far as it is possible to judge the best side in the competition with the best chancre of winning promo- . tion are the Arsenal.

The leadership of Watford in the Southern League is also at an end. This came about as the result of the first defeat in the home match with Reading. And there can rarely have been a more unlucky defeat, for the side were beaten \* ithout their goalkeeper having a single shot to stop. When Reading scored the ball was deflected into the net oil" a home defender. The advance of Reading has been striking. As the result of their first four matches they scored only two points. Then they drew with the Rovers at Bristol, and since have registered six consecutive victories, obtaining nineteen goals. Brighton, too. have gone above Watford, as the result of their one-goal victory over Southend. The team from the south coaot watering place can be I compared with Manchester City, mas;- --; much as their success has been achieved a.- the result of defence that is botli bold and sound. They have obtained fewer goals than the majority of sides. With two matches in hand Mill wall are only three points behind the new leaders and their record can 'be said to be a> zood. In winning at Norwich, Milhvall were responsible for a performance no other club has managed to achieve. It is often said that Fleming is indispensable to Swindon. The international could not play at Cardiff, and the Welsh club recorded -.* decisive victory over the champions- After their success at Southampton it was expected that Crystal Palace would begin to improve, but once more the tide played very poor'y against Luton. " SPORT AT THE UNIVERSITIES.

Organised sport at the universities has almost ceased ta exist. It was announced from Oxford last week that there would be no Freshmen's sports, and though the information is not official, I believe it h correct to say that the boat race, the most popular of all inter-'Vans.y contests, will be abandoned. This decision is akno'st compulsory, for both at Oxford

and Cambridge very few rowing men are I jj in residence. In ordinary circumstances t practice for the boat, race would already f have begun with the start of the trial J eights. But even this minor race cannot f be held. .-. -.i matter o: fut, I. C. l> Livingstone is the only blue in residence, k At both Oxford and Cambridge the L'ni- 1 versify population h.i* dropped by almost £ a half. At Cambridge, for instance, asj? many as two thousand applications for I i (oinink-sions have been registered by tlio j r Board of Military Studies from members | 1 of the University, and it is roughly esti-j 1 mated that !)0 per cent of all the last ' two years' light blue representatives in c all forms of eport arc with the King's * forces. In the circumstances all the : sportir.2 life of the Universities has been c disarranged. It Ls hoped to play a lew Rugby football matches with the public ' schools, and the various colleges are join-

ing together to make up teams. In the upset hockey has growii greatly in popu- . larily. A good .leal of gulf in also being ' played. COMING BILLIARD CHAMPIONS. ' It is often a complaint by those who f attend billiard matches that thy play ', of the crack performers—so wonderfully ( accurate in judgment, strength and touch, is monotonous. They want to lice the man in difficulties, and how he I gets out of them by strokes that are I ( not ordinary. The trouble in that trip 1, professional, most thoughtlessly, rarely i ( ' falters from the- easy, straightforward, , i break-building path. There bus, howlever. been a freshness fl'bout the match I. 1 in the tournament between thor-e young , 'rivals, Newman ami Smith, 'both of |! I whom are proteges of John Roberts. I !'Splendidly accomplished as they are, I their play hns not yet taken a fixed | style. It is not stereotyped — it i, bristles with iinconventionality. Xevv-r man remind-a one of Inman in 1»s early! and struggling d;iys. The game is not . ea.sv to hira. Smith, has. perhaps, made uphiis mind that the "in-ofT" game is the one that will paj" him best, and he ,

plays those long losing hazards into the top pockets Hhots that have a terror tor mosL men) with a tsuprcmc confidence tli.it suggests that they .are his favourite strokes. When he misoes one he i,j openly surprised. His breakbuilding methods are original and peculiarly his own. and his audacity in forsaking the cuy shot for one that has great rinks is astonishing. Already it is recognised that Newman and Smith mui?t 'be the champions of the future.

The son of a newspaper compositor in Darlington, .Smith waa a devil until a yiar or so ago. Suddenly he discovered that he had unusual talent for 'billistrds, and now he is earning as many pounds as he was shillings three or four ypars ago. N(fwinan won the tournament last season without losing a match, and it was a little remarkable that the only occasion,; on which he was beaten in other engagements was by hiis rival, Smith. At the time of writing, Xewnian has won the first of the

two heats of 4.000 up by the big margin of 1113. In this, each made breaks of over :iOO. and Newman played well enough to suggest that, although his start bars been very considerably reduced as compared with a year ago, his chances are not unfavourable. GLOOMY CRICKET PROSPECT?. Jt i* of sonic .significance that Gloucestershire have decided to recommend to the M.C.C. that the county cricket championship should be held in abeyance untrl the end of the war. At the same time they have signified that they do not intend to continue next ocason, for no fixtures are to 'be arranged, iand the professional members of the team have been warned that their -wages will not 'be paid. In consideration for them, however, no restrictions will be 'placet! upon them in qualifying for other j counties. One cannot judge to what 'extent these precipitate decisions have been forced by the unfortunate financial position af the elu'b. For gome rime cricket in Gloucestershire has failed to pay its way.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19141219.2.121.2

Bibliographic details

Auckland Star, Auckland Star, Volume XLV, Issue 302, 19 December 1914

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3,011

SPORT ABROAD. Auckland Star, Volume XLV, Issue 302, 19 December 1914

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