Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TURF NOTES.

(By WHALEBONE.) Mr. S. Green's recent importation, White Star, which was advertised at 50 guineas a -mare, has filled his list for the coming season. Curragh, which "won the Keimpton Park Great Jubilee Handicap, beat a dozen others in the Babrabam Plate, at Newmarket, on the l&th inst- Curragh is by the Carbine horse Spearmint, and evidently one of the right sort. A London writer who claims intimate knowledge with French as well as English Tacing, asserts that the Liverpool j Grand National Steeplechase is still the i greatest cross-country event on eaj-th. The French give bigger prizes for jumping, but there is not much to be won I outside the stakes, whereas it is possible j to gather a fortune with one .bet on the i Na-tip_al v and i_ consequence a highclass English 'chaser is worth five times; as much money in England as a top-' class cross-country- horse is in France, j As long as the wealthy sportsmen of England seek glory under N.H. rules at Livgrpool the prestige of the race will j never wane. It is not the sort of race ' the battler cares for. as the margin be- i tween the top and the 'bottom weights i is comparatively small, the fences are big, and the distance long; therefore opportunities for hashing up a coup are few and far between. They prefer to exercise their talents at the "regulation" courses and leave Liverpool to the swells. There were 20 starters for the , last National, among them two great j French cracks. Trianon lIL and Lirtteur | XII., owned respectively by H. De Alumni and James Hennessy, who respectively | represent two great liquor interests, | Mumm'a champagne and Hennessy's brandy. Seme of the English writers hold very poor opinions of the quality of the field for this year's Derby. Writing before the favourite was scratched, a well known writer was responsible for the following:—"The bookmakers, or such of them as are trading on the Derby, have I attempted to make Kennymorc second favourite, hut without business being done, and as for Stomoway be is merely ! n second-rater, and makes a noise to boot. Trinity Square is a real nice colt, ' md was not lucky in the race at Liver- . pool won by Black Jester, but can have I no pretensions of lowering the unbeaten , record of the favourite. Aldford was quite a smart youngster, and, like The Tetrarch, "has not suffered defeat, but unluckily he as not sound in his wind; ; indeed, to name the opposition, one can only fall back upon such as Ambassador, Black Jester, Brakespear, By George! •who, by the way, perhaps should be see- i ond favourite, Carancho, Evansdale, Hapsburg, and others already mentioned j or of similar merit. Assuming that Tne Tetrarch has stood still, we venture to j think that he would beat any of these, ] and that no matter whether the wo-year- ' olds of last season are three, four, five, six, or aged, none of them will ever reach the juvenile merit of Captain Der- j mot McCalmont's phenomenon. We can- I not recall a finer prospective investment than taking the price now offered on the field, and wo are confident that The Tetrarch will go through this season as he did last—unbeaten. I So many rider= of prominence have been placed on one side of late months for alleged offences against racing laws that if the rate is maintained the time cannot be far off when it will be fashionable for full-blown jockeys to be on the ' retired list. It used to be said that j only ridera without influential friends, \ and owners who were either at the same : disadvantage or possescsd only of one ; horse which would not be missed, were . honoured with the close attention of , those in authority; but if ever there was a time when certain people had license i to do as they pleased it is not tbe ease i now. No one know 3in theso days whose j tatrn it may be next, and, therefore, all: persons necessary to the carrying on of ] tbe great game of racing are supposed to ; be quite on their best behaviour. Owners, trainers, and jockeys recognise that they ; must play the game fairly if they dc3ire ! to continue having a hand in it, and , jockeys realise that to be detected in | the act of committing an offence, j>r tho j evidence points in that direction, whe- | thcr it goes to the extent of "stopping" . their mount or interfering in any shape ' or form with that of another, means to . he punished by the withdrawal of their I license or permit. And off the course ' aJso their behaviour must be quite proper. There have been alleged cases of; wrongdoing lately, which need not be particularised, and without in any way suggesting that the alleged wrongdoers were guilty of the charges preferred against them, it might fairly be asked if the supervision of our racing goes far j enough in order to secure the best results. "Vigilant," in the "Sportsman" of 17th March, writes of the American seat:— Now that we are almost on the threshold of the flat-racing season, Colonel R_ F. ! Meysey Thompson's article on the Ameri- i can seat, which appeared in the "Badmin- ' ton," has led to a renewal of the now ancient controversy as to whether the I stride of a racehorse saddled and ridden ! in the style introduced by Simms in 1595, ' and subsequently popularised by Tod Sloan and- the brothers Reiff, is length- ' ened or the reverse. Ten or a dozen years ago I remember that an Ene-lish trainer of much experience, made careful tests of the two styles on turf, with the . result that he found the American seat : made the stride appreciably the longer. ! Colonel Meysey Thompson in his article, I based on statistics provided by trials instituted by John Osborne on the sands at Redcar, furnishes what seems to be equally conclusive proof the other way. ; One of the horses employed in his trials was Scrivener, and this draws attention to the fact that they must have taken place many years back, for Scrivener last ran in public fourteen yeairs ago. That the American seat has its disadvantages I am fully aware, but if the old English seat gives a longer stride it is certainly strange that during the lengthy period since Scrivener wag last seen on a racecourse, the number of races won by jockeys riding "ait-up" fashion have been singularly few. It may, of course, be said that almost every jockey and apprentice even then had abandoned the English for the American style, and that was certainly the case. At tho outset of tho American invasion this was, not so however, and tha saddle-ou-the-withers-_cun_monkey-crouch exponents had -so j much the heat -of- the contest—as oxem- ' plified by- the -test of - tho -racecourse— ' • I/hat it seems to me-useless to advocate a. return-to tho older style of. raceTJ_in^

Mr. E. Hulton, the principal'patron' of -Mt. R. Wootton's stable, won -an important event at Derby a few weeks ago. It was the Doveridge Handicap Plate, and Flippant (Marcovfl —Flitters, by Galopin), carrying 7.5, and ridden by E. Huxley, beat ten others. Flippant started at 100 to 8. The Melton Selling Plate Mr. Wootton won with his own Bobbin 11. (Meddler —Handspun). In this case there' were 19 starters, and Bobbin n., which went out at 7 to 1, was bought in for 160gs. Now that Don Solvo goes into winter quarters with two recent wins to his credit, he will doubtless be remembered in anj" calculations that may be made jin connection with the Derbies of next, season. His performances do not place Don Solvo on the same level as some others of his age, but his pace is undeI niable. and the manner in which he won I City TattersaH. Y r outhful Stakes and i Tattersall's Club Two-year-old Handicap I suggests that distance will not come | amiss to him. His dam, Solution, was '. one of the best mares that we -have seen ; here, says a Sydney writer—so much was proved when she won A..1.C. Metropolitan with 5.2 in 2.335; Tattersall's Rawi son Stakes, Caulfield Stakes, and Mcl- . bourne Stakes. She certainly failed in Oaulfield and Melbourne Cups, but they are noti tiasy races .to win, and tho best horse may be beaten iv ono or both. When riolti.tion raced in Sydney it was ac the property of Mr. R. Patcreon, and be sold her before she won the Caulliehl Stakes for what was said to bo £-1000, and at a I later period she passed to the possession of Messrs. W. and F. A. Moses for 1023 guineas. There is no reason why Solution should not produce one quite as good as herself. Can a three-year-old racehorse tic made as good on Derby-day at Kpsom early in June as he would be. in ordinary circumstances, by the time he bad grown and matured in a preparation for the St. Lege.r at Doncastcr more, than •three months later? Mr. J. C. | Jackson Palmer. a. noted Txmdon I elcotrical specialist, is convinced that Ihe earn. develop the thorougbred .by electrical treatment to such lan extent that, given two horses lof equal merit otherwise, the "electric" animal will be many lengths superior on | Derby-day. Mr. Jackson Palmer .has 'already revolutionised veterinary treat- | ment by electricity, and it Is no wild-cat 'scheme which he will test for the special development of the horse from the day ihe is a foal until he has obtained pracj tic-ally full strength as a four-year-old. A famous handicapper, the late Admiral Rous, drew up and revised in 157.1, since j when It has been modified by experts, a 'scale of weight-for-age, and it gives an idea of how a three-year-old will improve between June and September. The j estimated improvement over a mile and I a-half is 61b., which is equivalent to ' several lengths in a hard race. As 1 listened to Mr. Jackson Palmer, a tall, dark, serious-taced man, says an Engj glish writer, expounding his views to -the accompaniment of the whizzing electric machine which he uses in the treat ment of many of the most famous men ' and women in the land. I could not fail .to grasp that every word was the outIcome of long experience. "What I wish [to make quite clear," he continued, "is that electric treatment of men or horses is not a dope, but a lasting stimulant. Many famous men come to mc for bracing up before thpy make an important l speech. I have not had the time 1 should have liked to give to horses, but ! during the last year or so I have introduced my electrical treatment as a cure ]in many stables, and it has been a con- ' tpicuous success. I have used it in ' place of the painful operations of iirin.tr j and blistering, and even medicine, all of which the horse resents, whereas ho soon 'accustoms himself to electricity. [Colonel Hall Walker, the famous owner and breeder, the Hon. George Lambton, ] brother of Lord Dunham and a Newmarket trainer, and W. VVaujrh, the prcj sent 'master of Kingdere,' have, among i others, all testified to the wonderful 'powers of the electric cure which I havt [originated. I am going to Newmarket, land I hope to conclude arrangements for jmy new development theory to be put I to" a practical test there.. Without any .breach of confidence, I may say that 'such a keen student as Colonel Hall Walker is much taken with the idea. II have already experimented on other .animals with complete success. The most important thing is daily treatment of a horse with the particular current I use, and it has taken yeare to hit 'on the right one. iiy treatment does not hurt a horse's particularly tender skin, and has a steadying, and not a ■ fiery, effect on nerves. After Great | Sport has run third In last year's Derby he went wrong, and I treated him regularly. To show what a strengthening effect electricity has, my assistant 'treated those good horses of Lard Derby's, Light Brigade, Glorvina, and Dan Russcl, before they ran at York . last summer, as their trainer feared 'that the particularly hard turf might be | damaging otherwise. Two of the three i won. There is nothing freakish in my ! proposed treatment for hastening the growth of a horse. It would not be like forcing a plant in a greenhouse, for jit would help to keep the horse well and less liable to ailments. It would build up the nervous system all the time. The system is simplicity itself. • Metabolism, or, to put it less tectfnically, the inter-change which takes .place between the tissues of the body, 'and which produces healthy muscle anil growth, would receive a hastenin. stimulus by means of electricity. It cannot possibly do harm, and I claim that it would revolutionise growth. Any two-year-old or three-year-old could be treated now, but it would be preferable to start with a foal. Ih the case of a late foal, which is handicapped whc.i running against horses born several months parlier, the hastening of develop ment would be invaluable. For the cure of injuries I apply the electricity by means of wet stable sponges, the current being obtained through long wirce connected with a box which the horse ' does not see. There is not so much noise as that caused by the buzzing ot a blue-bottle. For development purposes the horse need not be touched. He ■would be led into a small stall, and the current would be all round him for a little while. Hn could munch his carrot with a stimulated appetite, and 'ne 1 would be developing'unconsciously, li sounds a big proposition, but my 'Suei cr-ssfu! experiments will soon be put to , the . best of all tests —the practical -teey

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19140523.2.122.1

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XLV, Issue 122, 23 May 1914

Word Count
2,319

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XLV, Issue 122, 23 May 1914

Working