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"ALL BLACKS" ABROAD

THE FINAL MATCHES. HOW THEY WERE WON. fcEAVY GROUNDS IN CANADA. CBy Our Special Correspond-eat. 1 The "All Blacks" arrived back in San I'rancisco from Los Angeles by steamer on Sunday, November 9, and in view of the big game against the All American team the following Saturday, strict training was indulged in for the week. The second game against Santa Clara University was set down to be played at Santa Ciaxa on -Wednesday, the "11-th, but it rained so bard 'that on the morning of the game (word caane .through of a postponement. About one o'clock, however, father Rioard, a well known 1-jcal meteorologist and scientist attached to the University, announced that it would be a fi"" afternoon. So Father Elive, tie athletic director of .iho University, telephoned Captain 'McDon-.ild. and arrangements were made to catch the three o'clock train. We arrived about four o'clock, and sure enough, it had iturned oui fine. The San Francisco "Examiner 5 published a photograph .the next day, eh-owing the capUiins of the two teams shaking hands with Father Eicard, and thanking him for providing a. fine afternoon for the match. As :i ma-ti-er of fa-et, Father Ricard shook •bands with manager George Mason, but the wily camera man took a picture of ■the two captains at -half-time with their ihunds extended as if in greeting, cut out the manager and supplanted him with «&e two players, getting his desired tableau. Such ie the way of newspaper.?.

There was a good crowd present, including come hun-dreds of ""rooters. -, and the team given a good reception. The ground, although dirt, had been 6own -with grat=E. and millions of tiny green "blades "were just peeping out of the ground. This nrade ft firmer thau it would otherwise have boon, but it was etffl heavy. lie teams were: — New Zealand.—Fullbark, CuthHl; three-quarters, .Stohr. Robrrte. arul Loveridge; five-eighths, Mitchinson and Gray; ialf-back. Taylor. Forwards: Murray (wing), Willi ites, Sell-ire, Downing, Wylie, Dewar, McDonald, -and Cain.

Santa Clara. — Fullback, Ramage: three-quarters, Curtin-, -Mil-burn, .and •Head-caws: five-eighths. P-onrarron and Tbarrandi; half-back. HaTkins. Forwards: Anderson, Voight, Kiely, .Stewart, CcsMno, Fitzpatrick, Oilman, and QniH.

Rc-leree: Mr L. ?. Reading. Santa. Clara foug-ht lard ior a quarter of un hour, but then the scoring beg-in. started by Sellars. who scored a try. wsiich Stohr f.tried to -convert. Stohthen kicked a fine penalty goal, and fur tlier scores to half-time, when the to-tal was 17 points to nil. were—Taylor a fay, Stoir a try, and Mkchinsona try. which was converted by Stohr. who also had the other two unsuccessful kicks. The second spell was ushered in with a •heavy sh-ower. 'which soon cleared, -however. Sixteen more points were put on in the second half. Loveridge scored two tries in. quick: succession, and both g>oais were missed, and Stohr touched down on the corner, from which Roberts goaled magnificently, quite hk brst kick ■on the tour. Sellars scored the last try in the ga-t-hering gloom of the wintry aftenroon. Roberts converted as the pistol went, and the players trooped off under the light of the" watery moon Santa Clara ionghz a good fight" but, as -was always the case, were hopele?My otrt-ckseed, and the only consolation ■they had was that the 33 points was mne lees than the total in the previous encounter with the redoubtable All Blacks.

In the evening the New Zealander* ■were weD entertained by Father Elive and his boys, and all returned to San Francisco ]. a te at night, thoroushly satisfied with- a fine -outing.

THE ALL AMERICA MATCH. Then we looked forward to the bi" game against All-America at Berkeley on November 15th. On the morning of the game the party partook of a fine beefsteak breakfast at the San Francisco Press Clnb at the invitation of the president, ilr. W. W. Naught on, and it was much enjoyed by all. Opportunity •was then taken to present the remainder ot the party who did not participate m the game during Portok week with gold footballs. Previously only the fifteen that played that day got the trophies, but in accordance with a promise made by Mr. Naughton the Press Club of San Francisco supplied the balance. This was an act of courtesy that was greatly appreciated by the New Zealanders.

Returning to our hotel we packed all our pear in readiness to leave by the £3. Congress for Seattle and Victoria, British Columbia. And niiat an effort that final packing v.asj -,Ye tugged at straps, and we knelt on and squeezed our portmanteaus until they were like to burst, so full ncre they, both of the baggage we had brought with us. and the trophies and souvenirs most of us ivere taking home. Wise were the fen , ■who had purchased another grip. In order that we could catch the. boat the game was called for 1.30 p.m.. but it was nearer 2 p.m. when it started, for there was an army of moving-pictur.! operators who had to be appeased with a pose, and then we had to wait for Referee Billy Hill, who had missed the boat that landed the team in time. The ground was heavy from thp recent rains, but was in very fair order, all things considered, and V record crowd turned out; estimated at about 10.000. ,11 was difficult to estimate the crowds in California, as they were usually scattered. The best rr.jvvrrs attended at Berkeley. At St. Ignatius the spectators usually numbered n few hundred.

A crowd of 3000 would b: a good avev ■for the -whole to;ir. The ";rate"' is not

estiTnated as in Xow Zealand, when" we get approximately at the number of spectators, and the genres appearing in vie newspapers in Sin Francisco were guessed at. The attendance at Berkeley on the loth, however, mest have reached tile 10,000 maTk. The sew Zealar.ders were In tip-top form tiat day. and giTe their best display in California, The forward* simply ploughed right throngh all opposition, and theTe was a host of hhicli-jerseyed men continually Woss-in? t7ie ball. The game was played in two spells of thirtvfive minuti'S each, and th? blacks nern once let up. They played with a tin>!ess activity that eompleteiy outclassed Sis opposition, and their cleverness amply left the Americans standing. Htece vs&s only one team in it from itaxi to finish, and the big- crowd, of Lmerican wfawars, vim had come to see kerr dhos&i fifter n timie-f a. ciose gsonc f & must have vonafeced now long it wcH fake -the -oi the-. I

Stars and Stripes to develop- the strength, cunning, and tireless energy of ' those sombre-clad footballers from faroff New Zealand. The black forwards tumbled over the Americans as persistently and relentlessly as the breakers tumble in on an oceaji beach, and the •defenders were powerless to stop them. The teams were:— New Zealand: Full-back, Cuthill; three-quarters, McGregor, Roberts, Mitchinson; five-eighths, Gray, ilcKenzie; half-back, Taylor; forwards, Murray (wing). Cain, Sellars, Downing, Graham, Wjiie, McDonald, and Dewar. America: Full-back, Ramage (Santa Clara) ; three-quarters, Peart (California). C'arron (Stanford), Urban (Stanford); five-eighths, Mitchell (Southern California), Austin (Stanford) ; half-back, Care (Olympic Club) ; forwards, McKin (California), Hall (Olympic Club), Glasscock (Barbarians), Blase (Stanford), Voight (Santa Clara), King (California), Card (Stanford), Darsie (Stanford). lleferee: Mr. W. W. Hill (New South Wales). The game was not four minutes old before the forwards rushed the ball to the American line, and then heeled out quickly. Taylor threw to Gray, and the ball went on to MelCenxie, to Roberta, who scored wide out, and failed to convert. New Zealand 3, America nil. Away dashed the forwards, and McDonald picked up close to the line and scored, and Graham missed an easy kick. New Zealand G, America nil. McKenzie kicked hard down, towards the American goal. Following up fast, he was there as soon as the defenders aud, throwing himself at the ball, scored behind the posts in a patch of sticky mud. from which -he emerged amid" loud laughter, a real '"all" black. Graham kicked a goal. New Zealand 11, America nil. Away went the forwards again in an irresistible tide, and presently Dewar darted way with the ball. Feinting to Downicsr on hk right, the clever Taranaki forward drew the defence like a magnet, and swinging the other way, in ;or a good try. The anile was too difficult for MatcWnson to negotiate. New Zealand 14, America nil. Short, snappy -passing between Cain. Graham and McDonald gave the '"All Blacks" skipper a try, which Graham failed to convert. New Zealand 17, America nil. Tavlor hurled the -ball out suddenly to Gray, who fumbled and dropped it at Ms "feet. Like a flash, Roberts snapped it up.' ana scampered away, and, out-pi'-in" and swerving opposition, scored close to the posts. Roberts mufit have eluded the waiting fuli-back by a swerve that took him past the tackle with fully ovds. to spare. Graham kicked a goal. "New Zealand 22, America nil.

Now came the only American score, and the second and last occasion during th» tour when pointe were debited New Zealand. Cars got away from a «rum, and passed to Mitchell. From Mitchell. Austin accepted, cut in and back to Mitchell, who, with a clear run to the full-back, raced away at top fpeed, backed up by Carroll. Had he passed oat. a try was » certainty, but he held on, and < uthill floored him with a grand tackle. The whistle blew, a-nd presently we saw the New Zealandem lining back, and ■America taking the ball back for a kick at coal, the spot -being about 30yds. out and jnst slisbtly to the right ot the posts. A free kick had been given for interference with Carroll. The team denies that any interference took place, and it was not visible from the stand. but. anyhow, Peart successfully piloted the ball" over the bar, and the ten tnousand spectators opened to the full the exhaust valve of their enthusiasm and excitement. Joy! Oh, joy! the formidable blacks had been scored aS=™ st once more on Californmn soil, and the boisterous happiness of the crowd found vent in something more than an amateur pandemonium. * New Zealand 22, America 3. Immediately the ball was put into play the black forwards romped away, and "oin" ri"ht down to the line Murray ! picked up and scored, Graham convertling just before half-time, when the ! scores were —

Kew Zealand 27. America X New Zealand thoroughly dominated-the situation in the second spell. Before five minutes had elapsed Taylor threw out to Gray, and the sturdy little five-eighth dodged over, and Graham goaled. New Zealand 32, America 3. Down to the line again went the surgin" blacks, and Taylor whipped out to Gray and it looked to be a try for Mitchinson, when Wylie dropped from the clouds, and gathering in the pass intended for the wing scored on the corner. Mitchinson failed to increase the 6core "wrth the kick. New Zealand 35, America 3. The score now mounted rapidly. McGregor scored from a passing rush, and Roberts missed the kick. New Zealand 38, America 3. Then McDonald picked up in the loose, and in a twinkling the ball went to Wylie. Mitchinson, and Roberts, then back to Mitchinson and Gray, -who scored. The passing was so fast that it was difficult to keep track of the playeis handling the ball. Roberts missed the goal. New Zealand 41. America 3. Taylor sent McGregor away on the blind" side, and McGregor passed in to McKenzie, who sent on to Roberts, who raced from half-way for a try. Mitchinson took the kick, and the ball hit the crossbar, bounced into the air, and fell over for a goal. New Zealand 46, America 3. Just on time Murray headed a forward rush and scored under the posts, and McDonald converted, making the halfcentury, the final scores Ibeing— New Zealand 51, America 3.

A RUSH FOR CANADA. Then there was a frenzied rash for the fprrv boat, for no time was to be

lost if we were to catch the waiting steamer Congress. So hurried was our

departure that eoaie of us had not time to bid a personal good-bye to all those we would have liked to farewell. Wylie was stay.ing in California, and co was Brnce, who was to come up later, and the time dwindled to minutes, and the nrhrotes to seconds, and all were on <board except these two Auckland boys and tie manager, Mr. Mason. A final .■whistle and the gangway wae rnn out. ■we cast off, and all was clear when the manager made a frantic rush to the wharf, and there, too, were Wylie and Bruce. Poor o!d Jim Wylie! He had pot there too Jale to shake hands with the boys, and all he could <lo was to wave -them a long farewell from the pier. Although ire afterwards Jearnt that poor old Jim was ent to *he heart iynrijßing. it was no sews, for that look of yearning in Joe iace-a* & «w npUmrai to us hujtktg tsvet the nil m one May good Jnek attend him hi his new

And what of the manager. Slowly the Congress swung wide of the wharf, and turned her nose seaward. Presently the engines rumbled more loudly, and she began, to gather way. What were we to do? The manager was 3eft ■behind and he had all the tickets. Suddenly to our great relief a launch put out towards the steamer, containing Mr. (M-ason. A rtipe ladder was swung over, and the manager clambered aboard amidst applause. It wa-s due to Mayor Rplph's efforts that he had caught the steamer.

We had a fair passage up the coast and a 'better steam-er than the Congress it would be hard to find. She is unani-mou.-ly voted by the party the mo?t comfortable and the best vessel they have over sailed in. .Sunday and -Monday the 16th and 17th, passed pleasantly, and on Monday afternoon we turned Cape Flattery into the Straits of .Tuau de Firca, on the way to Puget Sound and Seattle. We arrived at Seattle about 9 p.m. and arrangements were made for us to stay on board ship for the night. We had a good look round the town and, -Mr. Alec McMillan, formerly of Christchurch and Wellington, who is located there, took some of us for a motor drive which was delightful. Early next morning we left by one of the C.P.R. boats, the Princess Victoria, for Victoria, and about one o'clock landed once -more on British soil, and proud and glad were the looks we cast at the Union Jack floating above the Government Buildings.

Victoria, where we were to play two matches, is situated on Vancouver Island, about SO miles from Vancouver, which is on the mainland, and has a population of -between forty and fifty thousand people. While there, we were lodged -at the Dominion Hotel, and had our meals at the Camosun Club, whose secretary is a New Zealandcr, Mr. Geo. Nicholson, formerly of Wellington. We arrived in time for lunch, and from that Tuesday till the following -Sunday, when we left for Vancouver, we were right royally treated by the C.imosun flub in general, and Mr. Nicholson in particular. Here we tasted real butter in the shape of a consignment from Rangitikei, New Zealand, and right good it was, too. BETTER FORWARDS MET. On Wednesday afternoon we played the Victorian team, and struck a hufikj bunch of forward*. an,l all-round team that knew considerably more of the game than the C'alifornians. The teams were: — New Zealand. — Fullback. Cuthill; three-quarters, -Lynch, .Roberts and Loveridge: five-eighths. IM-itchinson and Graj; half-back; E. Roberts; forwards, Murray (wing), Sellars, Williams, Graham, Downing, Dewar, McDonald and Cain.

Victoria. —Fullback, Spencer; threequarters, Martin, Hill and'Bennett: fiveeighths. Grant and Hendra; half-back. Shires; forwards. Watkins, Gillespie, Baum. Acland. Clark. Gray. Carstairs and vScott. Referee, Mr. >F. Sparkes.

The ground was turf, but heavy from | tie rains, which were almost continual ■ from the time we left San Francisco, and a cold wind blew down the ground. New Zealand won a tough battle mainly amongst the forwards, by 23 points to nil. the spells being 30 minutes each. R. Roberts scored the first try after a quarter of an hour's play, and it was not improved 'by Graham's kick. Mitehinson then scored a try, and converted | it; and shortly afterwards the same | player kicked a good penalty goal. The remainder of the ecore wa-s made up by 1 three unconverted tries in the second j spell, by E. Roberts, Cain and Loveridge, j the scoring being in that order. The j Victorian forwards were 'better and harder to beat than any team we. had met on the tour, and a rather lax control on the part of the referee added sometimes an element of roughness in the forward play, but altogther it was a very pleasant game. In the evening we were entertained by the Camosun Club to a dinner, and the tables were decorated with ferns after the New Zealand pattern, and the walls were hung with the Union Jack and the New Zealand Ensign. An apology for aibsence received from the Governor, Sir Richard 'Mcßride. The wh-o-le party 'had ■a. very pleasant evening. The Thursday and Friday before the return match were Bpent in viewing sights and in taking motor drives. We also -witnessed the AH Star game of the previous Satorday in moving picture form from a film een-t up to the manager from San Francisco. This film is being brought to New Zealand by Mr Mason and Mr H. Taylor. It -pained heavily on the two nights preceding the game, and although the afternoon was fine, the ground was again hea-vy. The teams were: — ■New Zealand.—Fullback, Stohr; threequarters., Lynch, Roberts, iMcGregor: five-eisMhs, McKenzie and Grey; halfback Taylor; forwards, Murray (wing), Sedlars, Cain. Atkinson, Downing, Dewar, Dougtae, and 'McDonald. Victoria. —Fnllbact, Ogden: threequarters. Martin, Grant, E. GHlespie; five-eighths, HHI and Grant: half-back, Shi-res; forwards, •Wa'bkins, R. Gillespie, Baum, A-cta-nd, CaTEtaire, S. Gaiespie, I Clark, and Seo.it.

'Referee: Mr L. Pafaerson (VancouTCT). A SAD ACCIDENT. In this game New Zealand played better t&an on the 'Wednesday, and lad do difficulty in -winning by 35 to niL Tries were 6cored by Lynch (4), McGregor (2), McKenzie, and Taylor. Stohr converted two and kicked a penalty goal, and Cain and Roberta each converted a -try. it was in. this match that the regret-able accident that led to the death -of 'Peter Ogden occurred, and itlio sad happening put quite a damper -on ihe whole "tour. Ogden played fullbaok fer Victoria, and sit would he difficult to find a more recldees player, or one who Inunened Jmnsrif into 'a game with co little for the conecquenccs. The risks that 'he continually entailed were great, and altogether he wie knocked otrfc on three separate occasions. Each time ihe acted pecniiarfy and >waa i»dry dazed, fcut he answered -all queries -with the reply. "I'm 3.U rigi-t," and eanpry refused to quit paying. Snfbeeqnent •happeninge revealed t-he fact that Ogden. received a mortal hurt the firat time be went down, and it is 'dreadful to contemplate •thart we -were 'playiug againet a dying man 4or"S coneideraHe part of the game. Ttet Jrart sustained -by diving headfirst into a forward nmh. Ogden was. carried off the field a. few nwnirtoe hefore -the game ended, emd he died on tie way to the ■hospftaj. Tie *cam, wrbh the exception of 'McDonakf 'and Dcmglae, ttJio "were Rabpoenaed for the mqnest, left for Vancouver on Sunday aftenroon.

At the held on the Meniliiy lßoming evidence iciv*;n by ?-lr. T'attorson (the referee), McDonald. Watkins (captain of Victoria.), anil fho doctor. The medical evidence etntt-d. thnt death was due to concussion and hemorrhage , and a"ve«ficfc~of~jrareiy cofcjdental death 'wax "returned. The funeral itoolc;plaee on Wednesday. 'November 28, and tfee Hew Zeilapdeis sent a hataaeatne wwstth.

McDonald and Douglas rejoined tlw party at the Hotel St. Rejis on Monday night, and on- the Tuesday the last match of the tour was played against Vancouver at Stanley Park. The lain ha-d been almost, continual, and although it wa.s fine for the game the ground was muddy, very' heavy, and in places covered with water. The team badly wanted Mr L. Patterson, who had officiated in the second Victoria game, to referee, but be was not available. Mr Patterson was quite the best referee we had struck in America. Finally, the services of Mr T. Byrne were secured, and he gave every satisfaction.

The teams were:—New Zealand: Fullback. Cuthill; three-quarters, Stohr, L/Overidge and Mitehinson; five-eighths, Grajy and jMcivenzie; half-back, E. Roberts; forwards, Dewar (wing); Sellars, Williams, Downing, McDonald, Douglas, Cain and Atkinson. Vancouver: Full-back. Bullen. three-quarters, Bazelle. Baker and Tupper; five-eig'uthe, Grimmett and Benone; half-back, MacRoberts: forwards, Smith, Bell, Sach?, Wedderburn, McDiarmid, Lee, Belt, Irving and Cream.

Tuesday was an off-d-ay in Vancouver, and the date could not be altered, as tbe Niagara left the next day, but a largo crowd turned out and viewed the game enthusiastically. The Maori war cries of a bunch of Now Zealanders wi>re quite a feature. The rain held off during the game. Despite the adverse conditions of the ground the backs gavn ;i magnificent display of the passing gamo, and Stohr's goal-kicking with the heavy, greasy ball was really marvellous. All his goals were kicked from the touchline, and the ball sailed squarely over between the uprights in the. fashion the Taranaki mun was wont to show in New Zealand. The score of 44 to nil is sufficient indication that the play was fast. E. Roberts, who played « great game, scored the first try by working the blind side, and Stohr converted with a great kick. Mitehinson scored tin; second try, and Stohr kirked another beautiful goal. McGregor next louche.d down, and Stohr missed only to kick n great goal a few minutes afterwards from a try h.y McKenzie. Three more tries were addel before half-time. McGregor senriug Ko and Stohr one, the score standing -7 —o at tlie interval. In the second spell the passing wis good nml the pace fast. Mitehinson set the ball rolling with a try. and then McGregor scored his third try after a grand dodging run, and Stohr kicked another of his "specialties." Roberts scored again, and Mitckmson scored the last two tries of the match and incidentally of the tour, all three goals behg missed. v

HOMEWARD BOUND. We met many New Zealanders in Vancouver, und they entertained members of the team both individually and collectively, although our stay was all too brief. Shortly after noon on Wednesday, the 26th November, we boarded the Niagara, and a couple of hours later we said good-bye to the wet. cold North and were homeward bound. That evening we reached Victoria, but the weather was too bad to go alongside, and it was not until early morning that the Niagara tied up to the wharf. An hour later she was full speed '.lhpad for Auckland. We encountered a very heavy gale immediately we left the shelter of the land, .and the ship was hove to for 17 houid at the height of the storm on Friday night, November 2S. After the first week tne weather was fine, and the remainder of the trip was very pleasant.

At Suva on Saturday last the sports of the town gave the returning tourists a real British welcome und enterts.irc'l them right royally. Through the efforts of Paddy Sheehan, the ex-Dunedin and Otago representative player, Rugby has obtained a strong hold on the island, and a match had been arranged between New Zealand and the Suva, lifteen. This was played in the late afternoon, and afforded the islanders and also the majority of the passengers off the Niagara an opportunity of witnessing the Blacks in action. The ground provided was excellent turf, and although it was very warm for Rugby football thg 'visitors carried til before them, finally, winning by G7 points to 3 (a try). Mr. \V. W. Hill, of the New South Wales Rugby Union, who returned home on the Niagara, was referee, and Paddy Sheehan captained the island team, which, by the way, is composed of white men, mosily New Zealanders. The Governor, Kir Bieham Escott, kicked off. His Excellency takes a great interest in the game. He has provided a very handsome shield for competition amongst the clubs Jα. Suva, and it was won this season by the club to which Paddy Sheehan belongs.

In the evening we were all entertainc-l to an excellent dinner, and we enjoyed ourselves thoroughly in true British style. His Excellency presided. Tbe ship left about 11 p.m., and the Suva boys gave us an enthusiastic send-off.

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Bibliographic details

"ALL BLACKS" ABROAD, Auckland Star, Volume XLIV, Issue 302, 19 December 1913

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4,113

"ALL BLACKS" ABROAD Auckland Star, Volume XLIV, Issue 302, 19 December 1913

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