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TURF NOTES.

ißy !WHAL£BOXE.) In France tubed horses are not allowed to compete in a race. One of the riders in the (Melbourne Cup informed a sporting scribe " that we all went to sleep in the Cup, and when we woke up it was too late." R. Wootton's stable had a fine innings during the -week preceding the departure of the last mail from England. 'It won a Welter Selling Plate with Chatham 11. (Kenna): Clearwell Stakes, with Stornoway (F. Wootton); Brentford Selling Handicap, with Spiked (F. Wootton I : Wolverhampton Autumn Handicap, with Gay Bachelor (D. McKenna): Suffolk Nursery Plate, with Double A filly (F. Wootton) ; Coventry Plate, with Whimsey (E. Huxley); and Kingston Three-year-old Handicap, -with Leal (E. Huxley 1. At this stage of the season Mr. E. Hulton (Wootton's chief patron) was a long way at the head ot the list of winning owners as regards the number of races won. Among the horses owned by Mr. Hulton is Stornoway, which, when the took the Clearwell Stakes, carried 9.5. and won almost as he liked. Yet when Stornoway met The Tetrarch. in Doncaster Champagne Stakes the latter won in a canter.

. Although., net much has been heard recently. in.,regard to the famous cases of the alleged use of the dope by Continental trainers it seems that the authorities are still on the alert. The Hungarian Jockey Club, where the "doping" scare broke out recently, mulcted a prominent trainer in a penalty of £12 for having administered to a hprse under his charge a certain drug of most innocuous property to prevent -Basal hemorrhage. The-trainer was accused of having infringed the new Rule of Racing, which jirohibits any trainer from administering any kind of medicine or drug to any horse within three days previous to a race without the medicine being given in the presence of a duly qualified veterinary surgeon. This, says the "Sportsman." seems the limit from a racing point of view, and to many an act which curiously aggravates the harsh sentences passed on men we cannot conceive guilty of the acts imputed to them by. analysts since disavowed.

At the.recent meeting cf the English jockey. Club, the mover of the motion, which was carried, doing away with assumed names, said he did not wish to go through all the arguments in favour of assumed names, but he would just mention one or tiwo. There was the business man who concealed his racing from his clients; there was the son who deceived his parents; • there was the parson who bewildered his .bishop; and* so on. The most innocent reason he had •heard for having an assumed name was oiyen by an owner, who said that when he was travelling-abroad it would be a great nuisance, to be questioned ahopt., his horses. ..There was a\very:isimple remedy for that, and that was, to race under lis own. name, and travel incognito, .like a crowned head. Was there any gentleman in- that room who, in his private capacity, would aid and abet a business man to deceive his clients,., or. who would aid and abet a ' son. to deceive his parents? To his mind, what a gentleman would not do in his jiiuiridual capacity it was wrong for a body of gentlemen like the Jockey Club to do. Thosa .were the grounds on which the stewards ajked the club to rescind that rule. . He took it that the " reason for art.assumed name could cv."

.he., for ..two .purposes—either■--conceal-ment or deception; and -they were aiding and abetting concealment or deception at £30 a head. He also maintained that it was an insult to the morals of the racing world. An assumed name implied one of two things—either that the Turf was not good enough for a man's name, or that a man's name was not good enough, for the Tuff. Sitter' of'those propositions was insulting; but they accepted £30, and swallowed the insult. The character of the Jockey Club' was more important than rules, and they wanted racing to he above-ahoaxd, and perfectly pure.

Horses owned by Baron S. A. yon Oppenheim won, up to September 15 last, in stakes "this season in Germanj. Yet good racing men are said to be rare'in that country, and the breeding industry difficult to maintain. At the yearling sales at Hoppegarten, Berlin, in September last, 10G lots were in the catalogue, and only eleven were sold, for an average of £161. A German correspondent, in reporting the sale for a London paper, describes it as a farce, pure and simple. Yet, he says that the stakes to be won in Germany are higher all round than in any other country, France excepted. Still, as very few owners compete for them, fields for the big prizes are generally small. The correspondent referred to says it is not true the Germans do not trouble about sport. There are many rich Germans who take great interest in all sorts of "sport—yachting for preference, because that is the sport in which the Emperor takes most' interest. "But they don't touch racing." One of the reasons, according to this correspondent, why racing goes backward in Germany is that a certain social clique pretends to have the exclusive say in everything that concerns racing, and another is that there is no real sporting sense among the Germans, who turn every penny twice and thrice in their fingers hefore they decide to spend it on racing. Another reason advanced is the manner in Which the sales are conducted. "The! crowd sit round the ring, not buying anything, but simply finding fault with every animal that enters the" enclosure. Nobody would consider himself a real sportsman if he was not able to discover the faults which a horse may have when it comes up for sale; and aa soon as he discovers anything which is not to his liking, he begins to talk. The poor breeder who presents hie yearlings at Hoppegarten has, indeed, to run the gauntlet. And then the way the horses are sold! The first yearling enters. The auctioneer, a " retired captain, says: Teaniing so and so, "by euch" and siich a stallion, out of such and such a. maie. There Is a reserve of - £200 on this yearling. Who gives .more?' Of course, not a soul answers: . Everybody & busy finding faults. The auctioneer asks again: %r«b o dy gives Jftnlshaa! Xn this'Va-w t„ Vu - - I* \

Two Australian jockeys were before the stewards at Keinpton Park a few j weeks ago. The objector was little Prout, a Victorian boy, who. a iter the decision of the Kings Lull Handicap, complained against E. Huxley, the rider of. Leal, on the ground of crossing. After hearing the evidence of the judge and of several of the jockeys who rode in the race, the stewards dismissed the complaint, as they considered that Huxley did not interfere with the second horse. They, however, severely reprimanded Huxley for not keeping a straight course. There are some turf speculators so hungry (says a Sydney paper) to incur liabilities that they are already laying themselves out in an attempt to anticipate the judge's verdict in connection with Melbourne Derby and Cup to be run twelve months hence. One of these has requested a local'firm of operators to quote a price against Traquette for the Victoria Derby, to win a good stake, and also againet the Derby and Cup double, of "the two Traquettes." This eager backer is apparently afraid that unless he gets in early he might be squeezed out by the crush.

One of the most interesting races run in England this season so far as the betting aspect is concerned, was the Champion Stakes, decided just before our latest files left. Thero were onlytwo starters, the four-year-old Tracery and six-year-old Long Set, the former being ridden by Whalley and Long Pen. by Higgs, each carrying 9.0. The distance was one mile and a quarter, and the stake £900. and the race was responsible for some remarkably heavy wagering, though some people, and among them "Special Commissioner," regard Tracery as the best horse in the world. Opinions differed as to whether Long Set was not his equal up to a mile and a quarter. So evenly were the opinions divided that though Tracery was favourite for the Champion Stakes, it was only at 6 to 5 on, the betting having opened at guineas to pounds on. But the actual contest was disappointing. Tracery made the running, with an advantage of a little more than a length, until coining out of the Dip, where he drew right away, and won by half-a-dozen lengths, in 2.6 3-5. This was understood to be Long Set's last

There .is a very strong opposition, I believe (says "Mflroy"). in Victoria to stipendiary .stewards, it does not come from the general .public, but from a iwho are popularly supposed to be opposed to any innovation that is likely to- affect their own peculiar interests. Those benighted punters who can go back to the old selling-plate days in Victoria will readily understand what these interests are." The Turf battler was not in it with the "big guns" on the Turf when it came to tieing up selling-plate or suburban fields, and doubtless the practice has been going on since. If the information, that has Teached Sydney is' near the'mark, it is not the "bread-and-cheese sport who objects most to the stipendiaries. It is the -trig fellow who can see more sport in one or two triers. They advocate a return to power of honorary stewards. They do not object to the stipendiary stewards reporting, .but are opposed to their trying, cases. Under such conditions a certain class would be quite safe in the hands of his old friends, the •honorary stewards.

Says the "Special Commissioner" : Concerning Tracery and reports as to the offer for him, which had been refused, I now find that Mr Belmont did, in fact, refuse the second offer for him, viz., 40,000gns, as well as the first, which was 35,000gn5, but the second refusal he sent to mc by mail, whereas the first had come by cable, and, in consequence, the American branch of the Central News was by some means able to obtain the information as to the second refusal before it reached mc. Both offers were subject to the horse not being beaten, so the matter is of no special interest now, but I am quite* sure Tracery's recent defeat would not stand in the way of a deal if Mr Belmont were willing to reconsider the matter. Of course, if racing is going to prosper once more in the States one can understand that he would want Tracery for his own stud, and would not part with hiui at any price; but if adverse influences should still depress American racing and bloodstock breeding, Tracery would prove a white elephant there as did his sire, Rock Sand, who was consequently sold to go to France.

A correspondent takes mc to task for stating that Tracery is the best horse in the world, and he maintains that Prince Palatine's victory in the Jockey Club Stakes last year under lOst 71b entitles him to rank as better. Far be it from mc to depreciate Prince Palatine, but I do not think that anyone now believes Stedfast to have been at his best on that day. It will be remembered that he had fallen and cut his knees, and this had most seriously interfered with' his preparation. He was only a short head behind Prince Palatine for the Eclipse Stakes at even weights, and actually beat him three-quarters of a length for the Coronation Cup at Epsom.

This year we have seen Tracery make short work of Stedfast for the Burwcll Plate (li miles), Lord Derby's horse being beaten into thin} place, but at Ascot', for the Chip, Stedfast made quite a good fight of it against Prince Palatine, and the latter won by a length and a-half. They were each carrying 9st 41b, and Aleppo (9st) was third, four lengths behind the second. Thus we find Prince Palatine, conceding 41b. and 5* lengths better than Aleppo on those terms. Tracery, on the other hand, gave Aleppo 161b last week and beat him six lengths, and if that does not show Tracery to lie a better horse than Prince Palatine we may as well burn our books. It might be added that Aleppo has twice beaten Prince Palatine, but I make nothing of that point, for there were valid excuses for the big horse. With the single exception of Stedfast, which was nothing like himself, the field behind Prince Palatine for the Jockey Club Stakes was distinctly inferior to that of the previous week's race, and this can be proved to demonstration, for Adamite (Sst) finished third to" Prince Palatine, thereby winning £730 whereas in Tracery's raeo Adamite, meeting him on exactly the same terms, viz, carrying 9st to Tracery's 10st 71b, finished absolutely last, Aleppo (9st 51b) coming in for the third money. Neither race was run in very good time. Prince Palatine won in 3mlh 0 15see,'and Cantilever In Smin osec. The really sensible ; line to take, after what we have seen, is to follow Cantilever until he gets I beaten.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19131206.2.118.1

Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XLIV, Issue 291, 6 December 1913

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2,215

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XLIV, Issue 291, 6 December 1913

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