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TURF NOTES.

(Bf "-W-BALEBOXE."} A bet of £1,800 to £600 was, a month, ago, laid against The Tetrarch for next year's Derby, and yet the English bookmakers growl. Fancy, 3 to 1 about a race nine -months off. New York exchanges to ihand state that the celebrated Brighton Beach race track will -be sold at public auction to satisfy a judgment obtained against the association owning the track, for 94,000 dollars. "It would tax a longer memory than mine," writes " Vigilifnt" in the London '" Sportsman," " to recall a worse sample of classic aspirants than those which have flUei tile picture' 1-hie' yea-r ; and if Sir. Bower Isrnay was chagrined when Oraganour wa-s disqualified for the Derby ihe may, I think, congratulate 'himself on having made the best deal ever completed in connection with t-orse flesh when he exchanged the son of Desmond and Veneration 11. for a 30,000 pounds cheque. Fortunately the' demand forihrm came from a foreign source; had the horse been offered for sale -here he would probably "have passed under the hammer at a vastly reduced figure."

The inquiry of the Stewards' of the 'Jockey Club into the running of Mr Gant's horse, Light Charge, has resulted in the complete acquittal, of Frank Wootton, the jockey, and C.Wood, the trainer of the horse. The official statement by the stewards on the matter was issued to the Press, and is as follows:—Mr Gant having asked the Kempton stewards to .inquire, into /the. Tunning, qf fcight Charge in the Bramber Selling Plate at Brighton and in the Vauxhall Selling Plate, at Kempton, the stewards, after hearing the evidence of F. Wootton, who rode the horse at Brighton, and C. Wood, the trainer, referred the matter to the stewards of the Jockey Club, who inquired into it. They considered the discrepancy of form between the Brighton and Kempton raeee was sufficient to justify Mr Gant's request for cm inquiry, but, from, the evidence produced, they found no reason to attach any blame to the trainer or jockey of the horse.

■We sincerely congratulate Frank .Wootton, says the "Sporting Chronicle,'' on emerging successfully from what has had all the appearance of something like studied persecution of late, and certainly is most unsportsmanlike action. The Kempton stewards, we have reason to believe; regarded the necessity of an inquiry of a flimsy character altogether, but as the matter concerned something which was alleged to have occurred at Brighton, over which meeting they nad no control, they were forced to refer the matter..to the stewards,,of, the Jockey Club, and their finding, ac recorded above, will certainly be received with satisfaction by sportsmen.

On tie question of .Prince Palatine's stud career many London writers have bad their say, and they appear to be agreed that at £40,000 tha* horse will pay for himself, assuming that misfortune does not overtake him. ■ Even then the new owner can insure himself against loss. Those who are unable to see how the purchaser is to get £40,000 and axpensee back out of a single horse will read what London sporting writers have to say on the subject. One of the number "discourses interestingly thus:— "People who are not familiar with the £ s. d. of breeding racehorses; will, perha.ps, be wondering how such a sum as £40,000 can be justified. ■■ As .a. matter of fact, Mr. Joel is, with ordinary luck, jjracticall}' certain to get the money back by means of stud fees alone. Prince Palatine's fee has been fixed at 400 guineas. During his first season, he will probably be allowed only 20 mares. In his second and subsequent seasons the cumber will, however, be increased to 40. Now, 40 mares at 400 guineas will yield guineas. Three times that total Is 48,000 guineas. Add the 8,000 guineas resulting from the first season, and at the end of the fourth year the income will amount to the comfortable sum of 56,000 guineas, or £58,800. Of course, this will not be clear profit. Supposing the horse's life is* insured for £ 50,000, there will be a premium of about £2,500 • per annum to pay. Eveu then the net - return will amount to £48,000, or just over what be has cost Hγ. Joel. Of course, there is interest on the money to be allowed for, but the fifth season will square that all right, and thereafter Prince Palatine will be yielding a clear profit -of at least f 10,000 a year, and in the meantime the risk is a negli- • gible quantity."

"Hotspur." oE -tfce -'Daily telegraph," affS been discussing the question of short stirrups with M-aher. "Legislation will not cure any evils of the very ehort stirrup leathers," such was the summingup of -the premier jockey. Alaher does aot Tide with, very short leathers.. They are short compared with the pre-Ameri-;an seat days, but certainly- not very short. "Letting out leathers," sententiously observed the- jockey, "will not stop foul--riding. It comes from the bradn, and not from short leathers. Surely no. one in the vide ■world could come and .tell mc what -length I should ride. Jt is an . absolutely ridiculous thing to suggest—this rider of the jury —though no doubt' it is meant for the' best. Anyone who is going to put mc on a horee and arrange my length, of leathers would probably see mc fall off. We have heard a lot aboiit the disadvantages lately, but what about the advantages? Those who rode in the oldfashioned way. could not live with .those who-rode in the new style. , I grant you that some jockeye riding to-day ride, too short, and the result is that they haven't got the correct balance. Balance! That is the whole principle of the seat," was Maher's terse comment. "A jockey biding vj'ith -a proper lengjth -with a short stirrup has twice the power that a .jockey had. .riding, in ihe.,.oia-fajih,ioned .style. I will .tell you why.. In the old- . .fashioned style they sat with their feet straight put in the irons,' and when a horse pulled at them' they had to 'caw' at its mouth, in order to-stop it. If your fee-t are stuck straight out,, it .stands to reason that the major.par.t,of .power, tfl ,stop n a .horse..must come ~fr.om the arms, and the minor part from the kne«3. Don't'blame short leathers for foul riding, and don't blame them for swerving and bumping.so much a≤ .people .'have done.. The,.one cornea._,fr.ojn.. the .brain, tho. t other is the .result of incompetence arising .from insufficient training and instruction"' very short ones, mind you—are* tile licet "for the horses to-day, and 'best. ior.raceriding. Get.-balance, and learn to sit

Mr. W. Hall -Walker has refused an offer of £30,000 for ihe etallion White Eagle, who ie now dning duty at his owner's Tully stud in Lveland.." WhitiEagle, by GaUinuie from Merry Gal, by Galopin from Mary Seaton. by Isonomy, ■is now in his eighth year, and Jiis stud fee is 200 guineas. During his racing career White Eagle won £ 15.832 in stakes alone.

The White Star liner Runic, which, on August -21, left Liverpool for Sydney, carried a valuable consignment of voun>; ■fillies which Mr. J. B. Joel Mi sok! through the 'British Bloodstock Agency. It includes two throe-year-old daughters of Polymelus; one out of the Oafcs winner, Our Lassie. There are. four two-ye.ir-old fillies, one by Pundriclge from Rnyal Dream's clam; one by Bridge of fanny out of Eugenia, whose dani is half-sister to Ornie; and two by Your Majesty, one out of Mouehe dOr, by Bend Or, the -other out of Pet Girl, a half-eister to the flying Delaiuiay. Such ■fillies are a magnificent foundation for any high-class stud.

, i 'It is rather interesting (says a London . "weekly") to read what William Day wrote about the old and the new jockey. He said: " If we compare the work done in the old days by jockeys with that done to-day., we shall find as great extremes, and, at may be added parenthetically, in the work done by stable boys as well, ft was once no uncommon sight at Newmarket to see daily ten or a dozen wasting jockeys returning from an eight-mile walk, thoroughly exhausted. Now such a thing is scarcely known and never done except by a few of our oldest men. Jockeys then were eeen riding over 'Newmarket H-eafch with a light -saddle tied round their waist, in their boots and breeches, and carrying their own saddles to the scales, and saddling their own horses. Now most of them ride vh carriages to the course, dressed as gentlemen in the very height Of fashion, and having their horses saddled for them. What would jockeys think of riding from Exeter to Stockbridge on a -small pony, with their light saddle tied round their waist, after the races, and arriving at the latter place in time to ride there, and to start for Southampton races the next in order in ample time to rid-e. Mr. Montgomery Dilly and John Day did this as boys for two ■consecutive years. Jockeys do not train in this way now-a-days-. It is too much trouble. The difference between the old-fashioned jockey of William Day's time and those of the present generation ie as wide apart as the Poles. Jockeys are spoiled 'before they reach ■man's estate. They are too well paid.' .

In an interview on the subject of Prince Palatine's defeat, the English trainer C. Morton had something interesting -to cay on horses generally. "All horses, even the best in the world, have their dull days," he observed. "The only horses I never saw extended," he went ony "were St. Simon and Ormonde." He was reminded of when Minting ran Ormonde to a neck for the Hardwicke Stakes at Ascot, and his observation was: ''That was a mile and a-half, and Ormonde was a bad roarer then. He is the best two-year-old I have ever j seen," was Morton's description of The Tetrarch, and we must not forget in estimating that high opinion that he has seen the best horses in the last half century. I believe The Tetrarch was tried again just before Goodwood. Possibly Mr. Persse and Mr. McCalmont shared the idea that the colt had <»x- i perienced some little trouble in winning at Sandown Park, and they would naturally want to see whether he had actually gone off. There may have 'been old horsee in this pre-Goodwood gallop, probably there were, and, if so. they were certainly accounted for with a big margin to spare,' but the point I want to make now is that The Tetrarch is said to have given 2st and his. usual decisive beating to Land of Song, quite a smart two-year-old that won at Ascot, beating La Marquise, who has since won twice; while when giving 71b to Black Jester for the Richmond Stakes at Goodwood, he was only 'beaten by two lengths. The grey horse has done big things with older horses, as I related a little while ago, but in my humble opinion such ■ a trial as this with another two-year-old possesses the more significance. In the majority of cases old horaes will not give their form in trials, and in consequence trainers are misled. Mr. Persse was not misled by Land of Song, as all who saw The Tetrarch win the Rous Memorial Stakes at Goodwood will readily adroit.

■ Still another Australian jockey is j making good in England < says an' English writer). When the season opened I antieipatetd that the two Huxley boye would finish well up toward the top of the list, but the run of luak which they had earlier in the year has not pursued them, and though their total of winning mounts is well above the average, it does not approacli that of Whalley or Wootton or Maher. At the moment Maher heads the list and may remain there, because the season is very near its end, and the lead which he gained owing to Wootton's indisposition,

and Jater to the court case, may be too j much for the Australian to catch tip. As' this is- Wootton's last full season on the turf as a joekej, it is regrettable that he should be deposed from the principal place by a conjunction of circumstances wihich he could hardly control. As lie makes ready to leave the stage, little Prout comes on at the other side. Those who saw his riding in Melbourne predicted that he would have a brilliant future if he were well looked after, the latter condition being an essential part of the prediction, as anybody who follows racing knows. Could we not name a dozen youngsters who were splendid!

horsemen, and who had every opportunity tp attain .the fame of Hales, and Power, and Gprry, but who fell; by the wayside because they were unfortunate enough to set into-bad company? Young Prout has been fortunate enough, to miBB this pitfall, and has ridden so successfully that he has lost his light-weight apprentice allowance of nib. Now that he cannot, make this claim, there are many trainers who may j)ossibly doubt his ability to ride so many winners. Tt is the critical period- in a jockey's life in England.' ■Prout may thank his stars that he is associated, teith the Stanley- House stables, .for the Earl of Derby is not deterred hy theoretical disabilities, and will gl ve the boy a chance to show that it was not the pull in the weights alone' •which accounted for his success" With a ■fan. trial and a reasonable .amount of r-iding, Prout ought soon to make his mark.

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Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XLIV, Issue 237, 4 October 1913

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2,265

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XLIV, Issue 237, 4 October 1913

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