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TURF NOTES.

V.'ipp iho .last mail to hand left Eng-|, l.i ml I lie Australian jockey. B. Carsl-.ikc, held ii commanding lead in the list of winning jockeys in Austria-Hungary, having : i'Kii-n ':58 winners. i- i, stated that Mr. August rtelmont ■has given M. llalbronn, head of the French syndicate. ix% option tin the stallion Rock Sand for breeding, in the interest of French and American sportsjvcii for at least -10.000 dollars yearly for :v. i) jr.ir.-. One reason for permitLin" li'vf; S.uid to go to France is that any ut" bis progeny will be eligible for nil" French races, whereas those sired by ■him in America or ißnplaml arc eligible only for a few French events. I At latent advices Frank Wootton had ridden l>o winners between March 15 and .Tune 28 this season, us against -li by D. .Maiicr, who was second on the hat. The month's (suspension he hns to Undergo will probably rob the Sydneyite of first place in the list, though his supporters are not likely to lose, faith in his ability to make it up again when the opportunity offers, as was the case on a 'former occasion. \Y cotton's latent •wins before the ir.i.il left were on Spades (evens Spanish I'rinee (!> to 4 on), and :Mr K. llulton's Waiontha 4 to 1). Taking comments in English papers as a guide, it may he announced a* more than probable'that the American-bred T-.olt Tracery would start favourite for ';l.e St. Ix'gi'r. Since running third in the Derby, Tracery had beaten Sweeper 11. in the" St. James' Pillage Stakes, one, mile, and a: latest he was nearly in .is good demand -as Tagalie for tiie Doncaster race. Mr. August Belmon.t. it may he. remprmbeved. gave £25.000 for Rock Rand for his American stud, so it ■will be only fitting if he "ins the. St. L-egejr with Tracery, one of that horse's ions. In order in effectively eradicate the ir.i 'course nuisances known as '"tick.tuckers" and '•whisperers," the mati-ige-ment of the M-elhoiirnc pony and trot■tins: clubs has found it necessary to engage sjVTJallv-iii-'triK'l-od offiriaJs. At Ascot recently one of the -most ■promin"en.t backers of lion-es and ponies ivac »rrai<rned for the former offence, and s«kod by the stewards not to attend either of the pony courses in future. Several oilier well-known raeocour.,e liaUirues wore caught in the. act of offending, and they were reported to the steward.--, who will interview them durnext month. The death occurred at Wanjranui last week of Mr Thomas Quinlivan, sen., father of 'Mr T. V. Quinlivan. of Hastings, private tmiticr to Mr K. J. Watt, at the a;e of 71 years. Deceased was on" of the oiliest raring men in New Zealand, and was recognised as one of the most capable men who have been connected with the iurf in this country. The late Mr Quinirvan took up the "Sport of Kings" ;is Mr 'back a.-i ISo!'. and had a very sue-res-fiil career, winning, among other important events, the. Wangan vi Steeple-ci:i.-.o in 1ST") with Brigham Young, and the Derby in 1870 with Rocket. Deceased fnlloiycd bis vocation up to a few weeks previous to his death, which resulted from internal trouble. He leaves a ■widow, ;>vo -nils, and two daughters, for wiion; :!::h!i sympathy will be felt.

V.> iiavi , .som? rather sprightly veterans aa; on ,)i:!r trainers at llandwick, rays a Sydney =-e:i'.w;, but for retention; of vigour none of them would seem «o be ii) it with the onvc-prominent English horsenran.. John Oabome. who took up ■training when lie retired from the sswid'e. Osburr.e's .=4ieeess as a trainer has not hcpn in keeping with 'his achievements as ii jockey, but a»t •the Newcastle (England) I nieetjng a fe\y weeks ago he won the Xorthumberland Plate, of £9-25, with a mare named ily.nora, whom he is stated to have repeatedly ridden in work during her preparation for this race. As Osborne recently celebrated his seventy .ninth birthday, he must be made of tougli material to be .-..ti1l capable of ridinjj work at that age , . Jn a, recent photograph jmblishptl in an English exchange, he looked a wi-ry little man of about sixty, and that he is not worn out after so many years' association with racing suggests lie must have always been of an easy-going disposition.

3rfr. T. Pilkington, who is in the. happy position of owning the. best horse at present oil tho English turf in the shape of Prince Palatine, must surely be one of Datno Fortune's favourites, for he

only -took up Tacinp some few years back. A London paper, in making , a, reference to Air. Pilkingfton's entry amongst owners, says that when be sent out his commissioner in search of a horse liis in.vii-u"tituiß -were: "Buy too sometiring good." Scores, even 'hundreds, of men ill any decade, -of iturf history express the same wish and) spend money freely, only to find themselves lumbered up with poor horses; but, Mr. Pilkiugton 1 straightaway got what he wanted. Captain Herbert went to Ireland anii bought Prince Palatine for him as a yearling from MY Hall Walker for 1,000 guineas. The son of. Persimmon won the Doncas-

γ-pt ,St. Leger, and l his earnings in stakes ■to date amount to over £20.000. Mr Pilkiugton is a Lancashire man, and is very proud of his county. That is 'Why ho called the horse Prin:-e Palatine. He is a.mprr.bor oi the firm of Pilkington at Ft. Helens, glias? makers, employing .thousands.

A question often asked is "How much money could be secured .about any horse at a fair price for the Melbourne Cup?" says a .Sydney writer. The answer would, in a * measure, depend upon the horse, for while Uic layers would not 'mind taking a little extra ■ •risk in connection wit/h some? ;tl)ey would be guarded where others were concerned. !n a discussion -on this point the other day the Bobadea -commission naturally ■ cropped up, and I was informed by a follower of racing qualified to speak •vviilh authority that slightly over £•50,000 was obtained, each of Australia's principal cities being exploited. I have an id-ea thai even more was secured when Sir A;>"mer was backed in somewhat similar fashion lor the 100S Cup, and it was hard to fay what price he would have touched if"his form, in his Trices shortly prior 'to the big event had been of any account. Ho eventually a f i< * 1 at 1* to 1. and ran moderately. Bobadea fa now at such ,i short price -fliat it wall only be nectary. for-hi to " n-■ promm-en-tly ift anything for thoao - - who got thutr £30,000 4 b 0 a abk. to ™ rid pi £20000 at a figure tUft will cover their _ongraM outlay. ■ It is w ZZ SIMC Bobadca rac-ed That 'tho publh: have not yet evinced any strong desire to follow the stablu lead. but -once the -on • .Booadil shove form in a race they wU ■• be sure to d,o *5. J

Tn the next Melbourne Cup the horses will be lined up -at a barrier treated some 40 yards below the old starting point iii the* Newmarket straight. The past I has already been shifted to the new starting plare, the reason of the change being that the judge's box wall be shifted to another spot further down the straight after the August meeting. All the other barriers at different starting points that will not .be required in August 'have also been moved, to correspond with the new arrangement of the course. By the October meeting the ground taken in at the turn out of the straight (in order to leave more room in ithe enclosure between 'the weighing yard and the stand) will be ready for use. The Guinaue appeal ruse was finally disposed of by the V.R.C. committee, at their meeting on Friday afternoon, July 26th. it will be remembered that Guina,ne was disqualified for twelve months in connection with the running of Recaller at. CanlfieUl on .Tune 22nd. Guinane appealed to the V.R.C. who referred the case, as far as Guinane -was concerned, back to the V.A.TjC. stewards, as Guinane stated he was not aware of the orders given to the rider of Reealler. The V.A.T.C , . stewards, however, adhered to their original decision. Against that decision (■'tiinane appealed, and at the meeting of the V.R.C. committee the appeal was upheld, the official finding being: "Tn view of the fact that the statement of Guinane, that he 'was not consulted in regard to the Tunning of Reealler in the Cambria Welter on June 22nd, and thai he was not aware of the instructions p-iven to the rider, is supported by the evidence adduced, the committee is not satisfied as to Guhmne's complicity in the matter, and consequently gives I him the benefit of reasonable, doubt, and upholds the appeal.''

Deal ing with the '"Muff' of the exAmerican jockey, an English "weekly" deals with him thus: '"Sloan, by the way, has this week been making some very caustic remarks in reference to the ridiing of English jockeys. As to that. lor whatever my tvwn opinion may l>e worth, I brideve that our own jockeys— pood many of -them, at all events^—can ride even- bit xt well ,13 those of other countries, but they fret, scanty on«*ouragement from English owners. Xo sooner iloe* a bi# race come on for donision than there is a regular scramble 1 to secure *he service* of foreign rideT»j>.nd our own horsemen have to look on wilvile others siecure alike the spoils and the credit. His Majesty, us did 'his father before Mm, is contend with the services of an English jockey— too. he is served in that respect; and 1 venture to think thia.t tile exercise of a little

more pluck, ami' a little more patriotism, on the part of English owners, 'Would go far to show that mow, as in the pa-si,. English jockeys can hold their own against any in the world. By the same token, our jockeys themselves might perhaps not be ill-a<ivisedi were they to bear in mind that a prolonged course of cigarette-smoking. late hours —-and other things—dio not -make for ability in a profession which demands the possession of unshaken nerves, instant de- ! cision, nnd unfailing pluck," to say nothing of physical fitness. The rewaa-d. reaped by a suecesslhil jockey is great but in order to be wortiy of -tire reward, ho mnet work ami' keep himserf fit.' .

A very cute member elf the betting i ring in Australia estimates that betting j has increased greatly in 25 years. Back : in the times of Jo« Thompson it -ntui i po&-iblc to wan much more money than now from ante-poet bookmakers on a race like the Melbourne Cup. but there is more general betting to-day. -Toe Thompson used- to lay some tremendous bets in one hand, for lie was as safe for £100.000 on settling day us au ordinary man is for a tenner. Joseph frequently got in a largo amount in one go to the owner at much under the mioted market price, for this reason-. If an owner were desirous of investing £5.000 on a horse quoted at 50 to 1 it would, be better for Mm to Like £100.000 to £5,000 from Joe Thompson and have dor.© with it than try to get- it on the other way. Joe used) to split up such big bets with his followers. Years ago Joe la.id nil opulent Smith Australian £100.000 against a mare in tlie -Melbourne Cup— 1 think h<-T name was <^rtmde,— was quoted in the 100 to 1 division. Joe laid 20 to 1. He had reo trouble in gettin.™ the money bosk. He tailed fhe. faithftd together, ami they all dutifully put in 50 to 1 to the extent of their books, ami left Jo« laying about £20,000 to £3,-100 against a 50 to 1 chance. Profitable books were very common with Joe —and little ■wiond'er! His admirers were numerous; ho commanded them like a despot, and they worked' for him humbly and thankfully (says "Milroy"), grateful for past favours and hopeful olf more to come.

Commenting on the Australian Steeplechase, a writer in the "Melbourne Age" says: "The public evidently loves tlv excitement of 'chasing, but Saturday's four-mile event .produced a succession of disasters that, must have inspired the most hardened racegoer with feelings of pity and dismay. The race was started at suc'ii a pace that one of the horses, Novar, blundered at the first fence, breaking a leg with a sharp crack like the sound of a stirk broken across one's knee. Throughout the race the poor creature stood beside the track quivering with pain, and mutely holding up a swinging limb, until a bullet ended its sufferings, in the. next round the second fence of the treble 'brought clown Tur.dulya with a broken back. There was a rush to the spot, for the field was coming round again, and it was necessary to get the animal out of the way. The horses' 3 own efforts were unavailing, but he was eventually ■ dragged off by a mob of youths, some of whom were hauling him ny the tail. Central Green, who fell in the third round, -was more fortunate in breaking his neck, while others that.fell without mishap were Guncap (after a marvellous recovery at an earlier stage). United Kingdom, and Bullawarra. Leah Kleshna lost her rider going over the sod waS on the homeward journey. The race went to Scrutineer, who won after an exciting race up the straight, beating Concave by a neck. The cause of the heavy castintty list probably lay in the pace ait which the race was run. It is said that the fences at C'aulfield are not high enough to be dangerous, nothing being higher than 3ft. Oin. That is probably the secret of the trouble. If the obstacles were higher they would be more respected, and the •public would ntft be treated to such exhibitions of reckless riding. Th dis-. ;' tance, about four miles, was got over in ) 7min. 653 sec, and it may be interesting -to compare it with the time (lOmin. i wT° , m which the Liverpool Grand ihSSi 4 mUed - 85(i alds ' « run

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Bibliographic details

TURF NOTES., Auckland Star, Volume XLIII, Issue 203, 24 August 1912

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2,368

TURF NOTES. Auckland Star, Volume XLIII, Issue 203, 24 August 1912

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