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THE ELECTIONS.

PRIME MINISTER'S TOUR IN BRUCE ELECTORATE. THE OPPOSITION AND BORROWING REPLY TO MR. MASSEY. (By Telegraph.Osvn Corresnondent.) MILTON, Friday. The Prime Minister's reception in Bruce electorate yesterday was extraordinarily cordial, and his long and comprehensive outline of the policy of his party in speeches delivered at Kaitangata, Lawrence, and Milton were listened to with eager attention, while Sir Joseph's climax, "We are going back," invariably provoked the heartiest endorsement. Sir Joseph was accompanied by Lady Ward throughout the tour, which was prosecuted by motor. On the road between tb* three towns people everywhere, aware of the Premier's visit, were at their gates with smiling faces and fluttering handkerchiefs, and in everyway the reception must have exceeded all expectations. At Waitahuna the school children were drawn up on each side of the road with the English flag hoisted between the ranks. Sir Joseph petitioned a holiday for them for their action "in sticking up for the Government." The Lawrence speech showed the Prime Minister in his best form. "The Opposition i are jumping off their tails." he said, : -'about my borrowing money, but. except I for one loan, the whole of the Opposition | voted for every loan that I have submitted. Nay, not content with those loans, they have come with open mouths gasping for more railways, more roads, more bridges, more land, more money for settlers. I have refused hundreds of applications, and if you look at the districts of the Opposition members you will find nearly all of them have a pet railway for which he wants borrowed money. When he gets his own his brother may go hang. A vote of thanks and confidence was passed amidst cheers. THE MILTON SPEECH. An immense audience which packed the stage as well as the body of the Coronation Hall assembled at 8 o'clock, and the Prime Minister was heard with eagerness and enthusiasm. Mr. C. King flavor of Milton) presided. Sir Joseph said he had learned that the Leader of the Opposition, speaking last night, said in reference to borrowing that the Opposition policy was to restrict, but not to discontinue, borrowing. He (Mr. Massey) thought that New Zealand could safely*borrow three or four millions a year, but the Government had gone too far in borrowing six and a-half millions, which would in ten years build up a national debt of £145,000,000. Personally, he (the Premier) was dead against New Zealand borrowing three or four millions a year. The implication in Mr. Massey's statement that they were borrowing six and a-half million pounds a year was absolutely unfair, and was certainly unjust. The fact of the large amount borrowed in one year was due to two important factors—one was that a portion should have been borrowed in the previous year, and the other was that the Government were making provision for the payment of £1,250.000 for the Dreadnought. "When those' gentlemen are telling you of our failings," Sir Joseph proceeded, "do they tell you that during the financial stringency, when the price of money rose, I gave instructions to lend as much as we could? No! but they said we were short of money, because we could not force £2.000,000 into three months. No financial institution could -do it: we had l to go by degrees. Do the Opposition tell you that last year we lent £'2,400,000 at four and a-half per cent to settlers to prevent them from paying rates that they should not be called upon to pay?" Sir Joseph sat down amid cheers. Somebody at once rose, and called for cheers for Mr. Allan, which were given by a decided minority. Mr. Wvnn moved. "That this meeting, havincr listened with great pleasure to the statesmanlike address* delivered by the Ri_ht Hon. Sir J. G. Ward, desires to offer him a beartv vote of thanks and confidence in him as head of Parliament of New Zealand and Leader of the great Liberal rtartv. Mr. W. Smith (Ln.bour) handed no a resolution reading, "This meetinsr offers a vote of thanks to Sir Joseph G. Ward, Bart., and of no-confidence in the socalled Liberal Government, and' that in the best interests of New Zealand it is desirable that the present Government should not be returned to office." A tornado of jeers and hoot* greeted this amendment, which was not seconded. "He is a disgrace to Labour," cried someone (meaning the mover of the amendment). Finally the motion was carried by an overwhelming mnioritv. Cheers for Sir .Tosenb and T.i> .v Ward concluded a great meeting-. The Prime Minister was afterwards banqueted. THE ELYSIUM OF REFORM IN THE MOUTH OP THE OPPOSITION. "BY THEIR VOTES YOU SHALL KNOW THEM."" SIR JOHN FINDLAY HITS HARD. Some of the criticisms of the Opposition respecting the work and policy of the Liberal Government were answered with withering facts by Sir John Findlay in the course of his address at St Aldan's Hall, Remuera, last night. Mr. Massey and his friends cried out that the burden on the taxpayer had increased j during the term the Ward Government had been in office. What was the burden of non-interest bearing debt when the Ward party came into power? 8/ per head. To-day that debt had actually come down from £1 8/ to 18/7, "Hence, when you are told with such volume of emphasis that we are going to .be hurled out of office, let us come down to cold | truth and ask if our outgoing is to be on these facts." said Sir John amid applause. "Philippic after philippic has been flung out time after time by the Opposition, and when the division bell rang they voted with the Government The result is that they are able to point to their criticism on the one side, and if a measure prove successful they can say. 'Look! we are partners in this piece of legislation; our votes prove it!' (Applause.) Again, we have borrowed £20,000.000 a large sum, it is true. But how much would we have borrowed had we borrowed the money necessary to carry out the works which the Opposition desired to see us carry out? At the very lowest computation we would have borrowed £40,000,000 instead of £20.000,000. (Loud applause.) And when a borrowing bill was before the House this last [session one of oar guileless members of

the Opposition got up and voted for a j reduction of the amount to be borrowed. This poor man was really misled into . believing that the Opposition meant what they had said. And what happened with I that poor soul? He was left watching | member after member of the Opposition walking over to the Government side and voting with the. Government against himi self—the poor chap who was standing for ' the principles of the Opposition. (Applause and laughter.) That is what I ,think I am entitled to call political pretence." (Renewed applause.) "As to the charge that the Government has eased the annual expenditure of government," went on the speaker, "it is true the annual expen; diture has increased during the Ward j administration by £ £ 2,000,000 — shock- ' : | ingly large increase you will say. But how is that increase made up? We have I increased the education vote to the I extent of £210,000 a year. Is there any- ' body in this hall opposed to our educai tional system? (Applause.) We have expand-ed with enormous rapidity, and I with that expansion comes an extenI sion of postal and telegraph facilities ; costing an extra £350,000 a year. But | in the same time please remember that i tbe increase in income has been £700.000. I (Applause.) Our old age pensions have ! added £ 108.000 to the increase, and we I have also added in the administration of . justice, in increased payments to the police, to the railway servants, and to other branches of the public services, so that the whole of the criticisms fall to ] the ground when you come to look into figures. (Loud applause.) The Prime Minister, added Sir John Findlay, made as herioc an attempt as any man could to pare down our civil service two years ago, and he knew that nothing he had I done had caused him so much harm. , i Suffering was unavoidable occasioned in j that reduction, but they did their best to put in the pruning knife, and even they themselves were deceived when they 1 found how really little could be done without loss in the services of the State. Sir John Findlay also dealt with the ■ charge of non-progressiveness against i the Liberal Government. What did ; progress -mean in the mouth of the Oppo i sition? Did it mean selling the freehold to the Crown tenants at the original valuebv alienating land worth over _ £0,000.000 for a sum of £1,600.000? Was , ' Mr. Massey's own political career to be taken as a synonym of that progress ' t_ey prated about now so loudly? Who called the Advances to Settlers Act Stat. '~ pawn-broking while it was struggling in , : the water and: before it had reached land? '. ' Mr. Massey. (Loud applause.) Only last election Mr. Massey declared tbat i the present Government was Socialistic. j and that all the measures which had , : been passed by it were Socialistic. Did , tbat statement of Mr. Massey's represent , his progressive mind? Let the people ' , of New Zealand be warned. They must I be .prepared to believe that the Ethiop | could change his skin and the leopard , ' his spots if they -were to believe that this . Beform party, were the true friends of ■ democracy and of the people of New > Zealand. (Prolonged applause.) | MASSEY-TAYLOR INCIDENT. ' MR. ISITT IN REPLY. (By Telegraph.—Press Association.) i , CHRISTCHURCH, Friday. ; Mr. L. M. Isitt has made a statement in reply to Mr. Massey regarding the j Massey-Taylor incident, in order "that . I men may judge whether I desire to make j political capital or am intensely anxious to clear the name of my friend." He • says when Mr. Massey spoke on the Bub- > I ject in the House after Mr. Taylor's death i j he was delighted, and without suspecting , I that there was any reservation he sent the • i wire quoted by Mr. Massey. When he f reached Wellington several members rei proached him with his failure to see that ; while Mr. Massey, in view of Mr. Tay- ] lor's death, had "unreservedly withdrawn the charge," he had carefully abstained • from the admission that he had been i misled, and that the charge was untrue. "If Mr. Massey were, as he says, on the point of a full understanding with i Mr. Taylor, he knows, and all who knew I . I Mr. Taylor know, that a full understand- , ing was only possible on Mr. Massey i saying: 'I was misled; you are innocent.' . Mr. Cole and others will bear mc out in '. the statement that it was an absolute ' mystery to Mr. Taylor what Mr. Massey had heard. He knew himself to be so j 1 clear of any wrongdoing in his conduct ' ' of the case alluded to. I "Now. if Mr. Massey were prepared to i bring about such an understanding and 1 reconciliation, then, by admitting Mr. \ ' Taylpr's innocence, why does he not make ! ' the admission now? Mr. Massey has not j yet asserted Mr. Taylor's inpocenci, and ! ! unless he either does this or proves his , • charge, the friends of Mr. Taylor will never be satisfied or regard Mr. Massey ■ as an honourable man." 1 AUCKLAND WEST. ' Mr. C. H. Poole addressed the elee- ! tors of Auckland West last night in the Church of Christ, Por_onby-road, ami received a good hearing from a fair; audience. Mr. Charles Rhodes pre- j sided. At the close of the address a i number of questions were answered, j after which Mr. Poole was accorded a hearty vote of thanks and confidence, only one hand being held up against it by a young lady sitting near the ! front. In moving a vote of thanks to | the chairman, Mr. Poole caused a laugh j by remarking it was a sad thing to see i a* young lady holding out her hand j alone. THE NATTY- LANDS. ; SPEECH BY SIR JAMES CARROLL. \3y Telegraph.— Association.) ; GISBORNE, Friday. \ { | Sir Jas. Carroll delivered a political ; , address in His Majesty's Theatre this [CV-ffling. The Mayor (Rev. W. Pettie) • i presided, and about 1,200 were present. ■ . Stir James was enthusiastically re- • ceived, and said it was a proud moment for him to be present to acknow- : ledge the great honour conferred «on : ihim by his unopposed election. He referred "to the fact that he was between . two conflicting —pakeha and ■ Maoriand had tried to assimilate them ; for the interest of both parties. He i had been in the unique position during I the past few days of being the onlymember of Parliament of to-day. (Ap- : plause.) By Mr. Ngata's return, there ' were two, and he believed that if it . were left to them, they could settle ' all the affairs of State if only it wa_ acceptable to the people at large. The native land policy, said Mr. J . Carroll, had been denounced by the Op- . position, but he assured them that all, i the members of the Opposition who'were j . making the plank their principal one.' ■ and were condemning the Government's j • policy, did not, with one exception, | understand native land law. The j one exception was Mr. Herries. He veil ' i tared to say that within three years, '! or less than four years, the native land

j settlement question would cease to be a difficulty. He granted that on land . not yet in profitable use, there was something to say, but they should not ! forget that every year was bringing ia 'Hand to occupation. Last year 345,000 acres were brought into profitable use, and he hoped to put up a good record next year. The Opposition would not tell of these transactions because they did not want the public to know. There was really no native land question existent. Comparing the lands held by natives and Europeans, he said that 213 •Europeans were holding about 13 million acres, while 46,000 natives in the ■ Dominion were holding 7,000,000 acres. A vote of thanks was carried. . < The Hon. A. T. Ngata, who was present, t_anked the people for the con- ; fidenre placed in him. In regard to i present-day politics, he said that much i was being - said in the way of a com- ■ parison of the two leaders—the late ■ Mr. Seddon and Sir Joseph Ward. His > own opinion was that Mr. Seddon had i a way of bringing off masterpieces on . the stage, while Sir Joseph Ward . threw his masterpieces about like ; any reckless boy in the street, and this ; seemed to puzzle the average elector. A Vonce: "Who schooled him?" , "Oh, he was made that way." ' THE GAMBLING QUESTION. ' SIR JOHN FINDLAY REFUTES IMP ' TATIONS. | A question was put to Sir John Find- ' lay at St. Aidan's, Remnera, last night, | : similar to one that was put to him ; earlier in the campaign, asking him how . ! I he reconciled his present attitude on the j bookmaker question with a speech of j ' ■ his during the debate in the Legislative Council on the Gaming Bill. Sir John ' again pointed out that the intent of the | Gaming Act of 1908 was to lay responsibility on the racing clubs for endeavour- j ' ing to keep the sport of racing as clean . as possible by licensing reputable book- ■ '_ makers. Instead of doing so some of j M the large clubs deliberately licensed men 'of ill repute in order to bring discredit . I on the legislation, and the provisions re- . garding bookmakers were thereby ren- . 1 dered nugatory and absurd. In the . ' heat of debate he replied strongly to ' I those large horse-owners who had prac- : tically accused him of being the friend I of the bookmaker, and he. would like to I know what man who had been in Par- | liament any length of time did not nt , , times in the heat of debate express him- , , self too strongly. "I have never, how- . i ever, been inconsistent in regard to the ' ( totalisator," continued the speaker. "I '; have always contended that you can ' l never hope to suppress the gambling in- . ! stinct entirely in human'nature. What I I do contend is that every effort should : j be made to keep it in the daylight, and by proper regulation eliminate as much of the undesirable from it as possible." (Loud applause.) > FOWLDS ON MASSEY. A SLASHING SPEECH. A WEAK LEADER OF A WEAK PARTY. The Hon. George Foiwlds addressed the electors of Grey Lynn last night in the -East-street Mission Hail, and received a good hearing. Mr. S. C. Browr. presided. | Mr. Fowlds said he had not intended | to. speak -again., this campaign, but felt it only right to reply to Mr. Massey. It was too near Christmas to fe.-l nasty or disagreeable, but still he must speak some plain truths. Outside of Auckland district, the idea of Mr. Massey as a political leader was not very seriously | regarded. Mr. Massey was not a j bad man, but blundered into awkward positions, such as his statement re- I garding the late Mr. T. E. Taylor. Even when it was known that Mr. Taylor; I was likely to die within the next 24 ! hours, Mr. Massey did not take that | opportunity to withdraw his statement, and express his regret. When the news came of Mr. Taylor's death, Mr. I Massey seconded the motion of condo- [ lence, but even then did not withdraw i his statement. Mr. Leonard Isitt, on | behalf of his dead friend, showed to several friends a letter which he pro-! posed to send to Mr. Massey, asking • I for a retraction. When the address- , . in-reply was made, Mr. Massey deliver. _ j la kind of formal withdrawal of 'his state-; , ment against Mr. Taylor. The letter j | referred to had then been posted. Mr. j i Fowlds said Mr. Massey was a fairly , I hard hitter, but had a disposition to ■ sulk after he had received a dressing- : | down, and when heated talked things j i Which he afterwards forgot. j Mr. Fowlds next referred to Mr. ' ! Massey's statement in an interview in j ' which he expressed regret that New j . Zealand's representative at the ImI perial Defence Conference had not seen i fit to join in with Australia in the mattor of naval defence. Mr. Fowlds sail ! that in replying to Mr. Massey, lie j I 6aid that gentleman was still prepare 11 i to make the Dominion an appendage of j ' • Australia. He considered that to be, : fair and reasonable comment, and was | : surprised when, a few days afterwards, : i Mr. Massey challenged him to prove ■ ' ! such a statement or apologise. Mr. j ' | Fowlds said he did reply from vol. 119, I page 13. of "Hansard." where Mr. Mas- ' i say, talking about Federation on Septem- ', her 26, 190 J. spoke of New Zealand's ! foolishness in refusing to loin with ' j the Australian Commonwealth in the • matter of federation. So far, Mr. • : ! Massey had not come forward and said that he was wrong and Mr. Fowlds was right. (Applause.) Mr. Fowlds also briefly referred to the Hine charges and Mokau business which he has dealt with in previous speeches during this campaign. He explained a matter referred to by Mr. Massey at his speech in the Tivoli on Thursday evening. It was Mr. Massey's statement rej garding him—(the speaker)having re-' [ I ferred to a Massey having received £4000 ; for selling his vote in the Irish Parlia-J I ment, Mr. Fowlds said it had been re- . ■ ferred to as an instance of genuine Tarn. ; manyism. It was in response to a cas- . tigation of the Clan McNab by Mr. , ! Massey. that someone looked up the . i history of the Clan Massey. (Laughter.) i ; Mr. Fowlds quoted from a speech by ; ' Mr. Massey in which he referred to tho , speaker as attending church and temper- . ancc meetings and taking care to be away . in South Africa when the Liquor Bill • came before the House. (Laughter, . : Mr. Fowlds said it was to be expected . I that Mr. Massey would sneer at any- , ■ thing shaping for righteousness. 11 Speaking on the Financial Statement, i j Mr. Massey had said that if the electors I would not put on the brake on the ex- . j travagance of the Government, it would i be a good thing for the country if the : | money lenders would do it. Mr. Fowlds • ! asked if it was patriotic for the Leader ,! of the Opposition to call upon the Lou , J don money lenders to put on the screw? , I He stated Mr. Massey's political phiio- { sophy was always ready to protect tho ' rights of the individual as against the .State, but he (the speaker) claimed it jwai e_u_Uy important that they should .

look after the rights of the State equally with the rights of the individual. In reply to Mr. Massey's statement that if single tax were adopted in New Zealand. every industry in Auckland would have to close its doors, Mr. Fowlds challenged the Leader of the Oppositon to read his pamphlet and prove the figures wrong. Mr. Fowlds said Mr. Massey used to post as a freetrader, but now it was tho poor working man's protected industries lie was anxious about. Mr. Fowlds said he would like Mr. Massey to define his policy, especially on the liquor question. (Applause.) He contended that Mr. Massey was a reactionary, supported by the remnant of a party which thought it had a divine right to rule the country. They wanted oil in the machinery of State and no sand; but it was said the Opposition threw it in from time to time. In conclusion, he urged the people to cast their votes for the democratic candidates. They had blazed the trail in many social reforms, and it was time io take another step forward to establish social rights for the people of New Zealand. (Great applause.) Mr. Fowlds answered a number of questions, and was unanimously accorded ' a hearty vote of thinks and confidence, on the motion of Mr. Peek. I — . j TO-NIGHT'S ADDRESSES. j Mr. W. F. Massey (Leader of the Op- I position), at Taumarunui; Mr. J. C. Gleeson (Auckland Central), at i»r_r; of Albert and Victoria streets; Mr. M. ' J. Savage (Auckland Central), at cor- j ncr of East-street and Karangahape- j road: Mr. Arthur Withy (Auckland | . I East), at the corner of Wellesley-street • j East and Syroonds-street; Mr. W. Rich- , ardson (Auckland Central), at corner of j Beresford and Pitt-streets; Mr. Alex, j , Harris (Waitemata), at Marine Parade, Devonport: Mr. J. W. McLarin (Franklin), at Patumahoe Hall; Mr. F. W. \ I Lang (Manukau), at the Otahuhu Hall; . 'Mr. Ralph D. Stewart (Manukau), at! • j Panmure Hall: Mr. J. B. Morton (Manukau), at the Kiosk, St. Helier's Bay. MAORI NOMINATIONS; (By Telegraph. Association.) WELLINGTON, this day. 11 The following nominations haTe been I received for the Maori seats: — NORTHERN MAORI. *Te Rangihiroa M Wirinehua L. John Moetara O. Huirua Tito I. Here-pete Rapihana I. Riapo Pohipi I. Eru Ibaka Reibana Netana Hemi Te Paa Wiremu Tuauru Kowhai.... Kaka Porowini WESTERN MAORI. •Henare Kaihau M. Pepene Eketone L Dr. Pomare '. L Ngaransi Taingakawa L. Pomare Hetar&ka ] ELECTION- NOTES. j ■In our electoral advertisement columns i Mr. Arthur Withy replied to-day to Mr. i I Arthur M. Myers' address at St. Andrew's Hall on Thursday. I Mr. J. B. Morton. Liberal and Labour i candidate for Manukau, addressed a largo audience at Panmure last eveni ing. being accorded a vote of thanks and ! con fide nee at the c!o c e of the meeting. I Mr. J. (". Gleeson addressed a large 1 and enthusiastic assemblage of electors at the corner of Hepburn and Phillipi streets last evening. I Mr. Alex. Harris addressed a large j audience in the open air on Cheltenham i Bench last night, and at the conclusion !of his remarks was accorded a unanimI ous vote of thanks and confidence, the i meeting ending with cheers for the canj didate. Mr. R. W. Smith, the Government I candidate for Waimarino, had an cxeepi tionally enthusiastic meeting at RauI rimu last night, when he addressed a j large meeting on the lines of his pre. i- | ous addresses. At the conclusion he was I accorded a unanimous vote of thanks • and confidence, a vote of confidence in : the Government being also carried. I Mr. John Payne, Labour candidate for I Grey Lynn, addressed a meeting of elec- ; tors in the St. Barnabas' Hall. Mount I Eden, Inst evening. A vote of thanks I and confidence was declared by the chair- ■ man to be unanimously carried, but a ' large portion of the audience refrained j from voting. , Mr. M. J. Savage addressed a large I audience at the corner of Wellington ! and Hepburn streets last night, the | candidate being heartily cheered by the I crowd at the conclusion of his speech. I Mr. W. Richardson addressed a fairly |-large assemblage at Pitt and Edwin | streets last night, dealing with a number ,of political questions, and emphasising , the need of both prohibition and protecj tion to local industries for the growth j and prosperity of the young nation. The j candidate later addressed a big audience lin Edinburgh-street, when touching on i the majority question, he expressed I the opinion that it needed careful con- j sideration by electorates that bad won on three-fifths, but for national option and continuance electorates he favoured bare majority at once.

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THE ELECTIONS., Auckland Star, Volume XLII, Issue 287, 2 December 1911

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THE ELECTIONS. Auckland Star, Volume XLII, Issue 287, 2 December 1911

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