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TURF GOSSIP

Mr John. Hammond, the well known English punter, who died recently, left behind him close on a quarter of a million sterling. hS£e ls «n£ ,^uT ey to be Eot b7 backins

Some idea of vrhat the International Horse Show at Olympia, London, is like can be gamed by the fact that it cost to organise £30,600, and that over 1100 horses were stabled in the building. The prize money was £13,000. of which £4000 went to winners of jumping events.

i<^ whlch won the En Slish Derby of 1009, in Oie colours of the late King "Edward, is not to be raced again. Minora was held on leaee by his late Majesty, and the horse is now at the TuOy Stud in Irelaud, where he will do stud duty nest year.

hnWT he t^i 6 of 8 out oi private stnds held at Hoppegarren, near Berlin, recentlr, was rather unsatisfactory. Half the lobs ma not find bcj-ers, and. the other half were knocked down at moderate prices A Uermau sporting paper demands in consequence that the Prussian Government's send at Gradltz shouid be barred from racmg horses, beeanse its eompetiiion drives away nearly all private owners their chances against a stable which is kept up out of the ratepayers' pockets beiug hopeless.

On account -of the exceptional success of 7 \J c *£ s raci »S carnival at Ostend, and of the Grand Criterion in particular, the Belgian Royal Racing Society purpose adding to the importance of the meeting Next year the valne of the Criterion will be increased by £1000 to £3000; the distance of the Grand Prix -will b e increased Irom 3 mile 3 furlongs to a mile and a-half; and H is proposed to institute a new tbcee-year-old race of the value of £800, to be run on the same day as the Grand Criterion.

It is stated that the Calcutta Turf Club are about to revise the list of gentlemen riders who are allowed to ride on even terms with Jockeys (says the "Indian Planters' Gazette"). It is to be hoped the pruning knife win be applied without mercy to a tree which has an unconscionable amount of dead wood and decayinr branches. The G.R.s at present in active service m India w&o have any legitimate pretension to be put on an equality with jockeys can be counted on the fine°rs of one hand. There are some vocal gentlemen whose names figure in the list, who are a positive source of danger in a field of professionals, a danger to themselves, to jockeys, -and to horses. They should be given the boot relentlessly

In New York last month the crack jockey to. Ungan was suspended for what was termed "flagrant rcragfc riding." A writer in an exchange says it -was a foregone conclusion that -when trainer Kowe, of Mr J. H Keene's stable, made formal charges against Dujnn, because of alleged fbut riding a week previously, that the iockev •wonid eventually be catpeted and punished, as, although that complaint was dismissed, the stewards naturally watched Dugau more closely. Throughout the seaeon his rough rKKng has been the subject Oi. unfavourable comment, and, when recently ther e was a talk of a combination of some jockeys and professional betters, tne situation demanded close investigation and the stewards rose to the occasion' Dr.gan is a natural light-weight, darin~ and wonderfully clever. He is fiist jockey to Mr August Belmont. and also rides for Mr Harry Payne TOUtney snd Mr Sam a Hildretn, so that Ms suspension means a substantial financial loss to him

nn M « " J ? aron " I s invariably enthusiastic on the subject of Prince Foote, and in a recent letter to the "Special Commissioner" or the London "Sportsman," he made the ■following reference to the son of Sir Foote'l received a tvire from air Tuille the £loaToo ' tllcr meet to ' wf - a - races - ana resetted he went .wrong. Well, I hoM he will be all right next spring, and then he X £ "^ riko «' s Party, have the question settled by the two meeting In a twomile or three-mile weight-for-age race— tney like-for tHe 'Prince 1 will tHke them all on, and in a solid-run race give them an they want before the winning post is rea-chea, because he is, I think, the tw,, + 7° ever seen in Australia." lernaps the "Special Commissioner" will later on be able to give us Mr "Baron's" opinion of Duke Foote, and the only thin" trackers hope is that it -will reach here prior to the decision of the Melbourne Cup

rs£%? I e e ¥' Z e:lTnD?s are ben 5 shipped to ling and m fairly large numbers, and as special attendants are not sent over with them, the cost of. landin? them at Newmarket is less than £20 each. As the rearing of yearlings in America ie inexpensive, as compared with the cost fa England it is I suggested thai, in fairness to small breeders in the latter conntry, a registration fee of £10 or .£2O shonld be imposed on every American-bred yearling as against the 10/ at present charged. A writer in the London •■bportrman" is specially severe on native American blocd. and, in addition to remarking that it seldom or never produces a stayer and poisons the English breed says that though it is admitted to the' General Stud Book," it certainly ought not to be. Now that racing is settled in New iorlc, and th-cre ifi nearly sure to be a. marked increase in the importation of American-bred yearlings, possibly the English Jockey Club may make a move in the direction of an increased ic-gistration. fee.

We have at length got the true measure of the form of Lemberg and Neil Gow, says the -Sporting Times." They are equal, as practically they were in tlie Tyro Thousand Guineas. This does away -with all the nonsense that was talked about Lemberg not Dems flt when he ran at Newmarket, and of 'Neil Gow pressing upon him. To our thinking, as we said at the time, Lember" looked biff and well, and no horse- that was not thoroughly fit could hare battled with Nell Gcrw for the last furlong when it came to .1 head struggle as he did. Neil ww got his head in front halfway up the hill, and kept it there, with both horses doing their utmost. In the Derby Neil Gow was admitted-ly in -no sort of plight, and moreover, the finish was on a hill, the same as at -Newmarket. There was this difference hetween the finish for the Two Thousand Guineas and the Eclipse, that at Newmarket when Neil <3ow challenged on the hill, and got his head In front he kept it there. At Sandown, after he had made his effort and got level. Lemberg drew away from him again, and looked like easily. When, however, Lord Kosebery's colt 'came again," Lemberg did not resist this final challenge, as he' had done the previous one, and (he result was a dead heat._ On this -course last year, after getting off last for the great two-year-old race Neil <Jow finished first, and wou £5000. It ■was very nearly the same here, as once more getting off last, he tied for tile first place at the finish, and again won £5000. Any little advantage there may have -been in the start for the Eclipse "stakes was gamed by Lemoerg, and this may explain why his performance was a "head" better than at Newmarket.

In writing of 1.-emberg and Neil Gow, an English authority says: "There have been several instances in turf history of two great rivals constantly meeting," th e pair standing out far above their ri-vals. Such, for instance, was the case with Voltigenr and the Flying Dutchman in the middle of the last century. Such also was the case with Carbine and Abereorn in Australia twenty years ago. There have been few [ more notable instances than that of Bend Or and Robert the Devil. Bend Or (F Archer) and Robert the Devil (Bossiter) finished in the Derby of ISOO in the order written. They next met in the St Leger, Robert the Devil (T. Cannon) proving victorious. Bend Or -eras again the monnt of following month, Robert the Devil again beat Bend Or, the jockeys being the Game as last. In the Champion Stakes at the Newmarket Second October Mreting, Robert the Devil was again (he victor over Bend Or, Rosslter being on the former and Fordham on the latter. In the following year they were the only runners in the Bp'som Gold Cup, to which there were twentyeight subscribers. Bend Or (F. Archer in the saddle) on this occasion ivas returned the winner by a neck, while Robert the Devil (I. Cannon) started farorrrite. This was -the-last time they met,"

KBy WHALEBONE.)'

It -will be interesting to tJK>se.<wio-3iaTe Ho idea at the magnitude of racing affaire to know that there are 280 horses in regular work, at Sand-wick, and 283 at Flemtogton. As every suburban course in each State has also its own team, it will be safe to say that In New South Wales and Victoria there ■must be quite 800 liorses , in actual training. What a big item this is to feed merchants, farriers, and others interested <says a Sydney paper), does not require a specialist to point out.

la the English Derby of 1912, the entries for which appeared on July 1, His Majesty King George V. 'has the following, engagelf Colt by Fiorizel 11. out of Loch Doon, colt by Florizel 11. out of Guinea Hen. celt by Thrush out of Laodamla, colt by VoloSyavski out of Runaway Match, an"d colt b> Lord Bobs out of Mirabelle. There :tre altogether 364 entries, including 21 .'made in New York. In the Oaks for the same year 'His Majesty has entered a filly'by'Plying Fox ont of April Princess, filly by Florizel 11. out of Sweet Vernal, and filly by Martagon out of Mundon. There are altogether 269 entries, including 12-made In. New YorS.

There is a rumour (says the "Sydney Telegraph"), and oue with some degree of truth in it, to the effect that all is-not quite as it should be with Artillerie. Her owner is said to be experiencing an anxious time with Artillerie, aud if the trouble proves serious the fact will be generally regretted. That m.ire has come a long -way to engage at the spring meetinas, and her owner's enterprise is deserving "of at le.ost a share of good luck. .One" of "the fancy picks for Gaulfield Cnp is Artillerie, and-sha has been befriended accordingly; ~ -

The balance-sheet of the Wilßsasftewn Racing Club for the past year has been issued. It shows that a very successful year has Ireen experienced. The year started vnth a debit balance of £556, and finished with a credit baiance 61 £55, after paying ~320 in Government and other - taxes; "£-JisO as a subsidy .to, the Railway.'Department, £125 in maintaining the course, and £225 in improvements. During the- year the club gave £7653 in etakes, as against £5130 the previous year, and the profit over race meetings was only £263 less.' The assets of the club include £SOO2 at fixed deposit or m Government debentures; so that the financial outlook for the-future is. very satisfactory.

[ The victory of Nnage in the Granxi P-lx has not been a source of unmitigated.' ioy to Frenchmen, for, let alone the "fact that his owner is Russian, the horse himself, like all thoroughbred racers, toeing of purely English descent, as likewise his trainer and jockey, makes the victory Brirish rather tLan Gallic. Alluding to >Juage's win. a distinguished French-sporting writer exclaims: "I am little concerned .to know if >iuage is of purely English origin, and if to England does not chiefly fall the .honour. For mc the soil of (France, our soil, our climate, it is which gave the horse <3zs requisite :rtreng£ii and power' of resistance to come YietorisEis out of this great itriaU"

One of the horses leased by Lord Derby from King George was successful at Newmarket on July 12. This was the unnamed colt by Plorizel 11. from Meadow Chat, who, in the hands of F. Wootton, won the Khedive Plate, for two-year-olds, by a head from Mr. Whitney's Persimmon colt There were ■Iβ runners. "Sporting Life" thu3 spoke of the performance:—"Meadow CTiat coft put in, such splendid work to overfianl Nerestan and the Persimmon—-Dame d'Or. filly in the Khedive Plate that he has only to make regulation improvement from two to three years of age to next season'carry King George's purple jacket -with distinction. He is a colt quite above average size, and has all tie makings of -a high-clas3 racehorse."

In England Taitersall's cemmitree have rescinded the fifteen minutes rule, and reverted to the old order of things. The "Winning Post," whi-cft was always tlltin" at the rule, cays "it is to be deprecated, that such a drastic m-easuce should ever have been introduced, for to demand that an owner should have to object against a horse within fifteen minutes of his welgh-ing-in, or he lost the bets, was as harsh, and arbitrary as giving the bets to a horse m tie Forfeit Ljfit, or one that was not the property of the nominator at the time of entry, which actually occurred. Such a state of things on the stage Would have been diverting, not say ludicrous, but, -when introduced Into real life, it caused honest men to laugh on the wrong side of their mouths." Such a rule was purely in the interest of the bookmakers.

It would seem, from recent happenings, that doping is not dead—at least, in. America. The following is from the "New York American" of July 10: "When the judg-es banded down a decision at Latonia a few days ago ruling a well known trainer and his horses off the turf for the alleged doping of Nadzu, it meant a temporary r.ussatton in the activities of one of' the nost successful, trainers, of the pas*-" few years. He was known all over the country os the wizard trainer. He could- get hold ox the worst cripple in the -game, and before many months would have the horse classed among'the winners."" How' he"'employed the has-beens was always a puzzle. But he did, and though there were many rumours that lie used stimulants, nothing was ever found against the man -until the solons at the Kentucky course adjudged him guilty of 'doping. , » J •-•*

A few weeks ago Mr Horatio BottomTey, M.P., made certain proposals in the English House of Commons for new taxation, including the taxation of racing stakes,-the State licensing of racecourses, the licensing of bookmakers, and the taxing of "betting transactions. When asked by an interviewer what his object was in making -these proposals, and -what he expected to accomplish supposing they were adopted 'he jreplied, "My object is twofold. First, I -wisS this country to follow the example of France and Germany, and secure a large revenue for the State; and, secondly, I desire to place racing and betting upon a more satisfactory basis than-is at present the case. Look what France does. At present it derives several millions sterltri~ a year, of which the poor and the hospitals get a. larje proportion, and a substantial sum goes to tte encouragement of horsebreeding. Tht result is that legitimate betting transactions are looked upon in that country as nothing to be ashamed of, althongh. owing to the existence of the parimutuels, the State has so far declined to legalise bookmakers, preferring to keep the business in its own hands." Asked ther there was any hostility to racing, in his proposals, his reply was, "[ am not ia any way hostile to the interests of racing," and he <went on to add, "In the next jumping season I hope to have my colours well to the fore, and to introduce next year a considerable number of young horses from my own stud farm.'.the progeny of my old favourites—Wargrare (a son of Carbine), Hawfinch, and Le Blizon "

Says a Melbourne writer: "Tie feature of the V.R.C. races at Flemington on Saturday was the form of tie A.j.C. and V.U.C. Derby candidate, Blairgour. A fortnight previously, at Caulfield. lie had run last, but In the Three and Four-Year-old Handicap at Flemington,. 'lie and the imported horse, Eye Glass (in Scobie's stable), were always lie favourites. Eye Glass eventually going out in the better demand. Blairgour could not apparently get ont of his own way at CaTiliield. and ran last in his two races at different meetings. He has been, doing a fair amount of work since his-last appearance, and this evidently sharpened 'him up, as lie hopped out in -front tis soon as the barrier rose, and Gtayed at the head of affairs until a few strides from tie post, •when both Balmoral and Santos beat him, the judge's verdict being a head and a halfhead. Blairgour hae a dirty disposition, •and tried to get off at the home turn, and Imn-g out a good deal all the way op the straight. Balmoral really had the race won at the distance, but his apprentice rider ttiok things remarkably easy, and only, got there by a hsad. Blsirgour will probably have another ran in pnhlic foefore lie goes to Sydney, and if he continues to make the same Improvement he must win next time. There is no doobt he is a good colt, but his disposition will always be against him, Hβ has pace, yet has still to sbxrw "fiat he can stay. I should : want to see ihim prove himself more before pronouncing mm good enough to hold his own with Beverage, Desert Rose, and -ffSl^vgpfta.-flaes.Jn.jJa Sidney Derhx. .i- ; „_._;__■■.-'

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TURF GOSSIP, Auckland Star, Volume XLI, Issue 209, 3 September 1910

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TURF GOSSIP Auckland Star, Volume XLI, Issue 209, 3 September 1910

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