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TURE GOSSIP

The fact of Wootton thavtag been suspended from riding terminates his contract to lide for LoTd Derby. It may, of course, eventually be renewed, but it will be under different conditions. .

Luck runs in grooves. Mr Wootton Invariably backs liis son's mounts, and he had £50 on Valens for the Newbury Cup, which he won. Finding that the boy would not be allo-wed to ride, «je went lo the bootmaker and ecratched the bet. Entered to be sold for £50, a two-year-old named Marechal Strozzi (Strozzi —Bquinoxe) went to lClOgs before his owner was able to buy him in subsequent to winning a two-year-old selling race at Newbury (Eng.) last month.

We have been informed, says the "Sporting Times," but by no means voucli for the truth of the information, that the members of the Jockey Club discussed at Newmarket ttse desirability of resorting to flagellation as a punishment for light-weight jockeys and apprentices found guilty of foul riding or other offences. There is a certain amount of cockiness about all boys, more especially jockey boys, who look upon them selves as men, wliereas they are only lads and must be taught that.

Mr B. Allen, of Victoria, has been pricing Flotsam, who recently returned to England from Uruguay (South America), but as the sum of IO.OOOgs is asked, and the Victorian has only offered 7000gs, the chances seem against the' son of St. Frusquin and Float coming to Australia. At Buenos Aires last year, seven of Flotsam's colts averaged £1432 10/, the highest priced one of the lot realising £3850, and as Iα England this season his list quietly closed at lOOgs, his owner has no cause to be anxious to sell. Flotsam, -whose wins include the Middle Park .Plate, in which he beat Bock Sand, is now ten years old.

Tlie American jockey, C. H. Shilling, has been refused a license by the stewards of the New York Jockey Club. His application was not definitely denied, but was tabled, which action has the same effect, at least temporarily. Last fall Shilling, while in the employ of R, L. Thomas, had an altercation with his employer, in which he is alleged to have stabbed Thomas seriously. This charge is still hanging over him in the courts, and will come up ror trial during the spring. Shining rode at Juarez and Oakland during the winter months, and it was thought that he might ride during the coming season, provided he be granted a license for the coining season. Mr S. C. Hildreth had engaged him to ride during the coming season, provided he secured a license, and the tabling of his application .will leave Hildreth. without a first stable jockey.

The English official "Racing Calendar," ! which, appeared about Easter, contained the grave and extremely solemn announcement j that "P. Peck, hairing been reported to the stewards of the Jockey Club for exercising ihorses on enclosed ground, has been reprlmanded and fined ssovs." To appreciate the grim humour of this (says "The Tattler") it should be remembered thai Percy j Peck is Lord Durham's private trainer, and as Lord Durham fills a high place in connection with Jockey Club rule, the powers cannot Iv future be accused of partiality. No doubt, the trainer is extremely I sorry for his heinous offence — you will notice that the noises which assisted to commit the crime cere Lord Durham's — and he probably feels the sticg of the advertised reprimand as keenly as he promptly paid up the "fiver"; but as I cannot recall to mind that this particular trainer has ever befoile sinned in this way, does not the method of punishment seem like that which befel the butterfly over which a Juggernaut ear passed?

The latest from West Australia, is that, for the time being, at any rate, the Government is unlikely to interfere with bookmalcing on rececourses, but that the suppression of shop and street betting is to be vigorously prosecuted. Though, personally favouring the totalisator, I cannot see anything against a continuation of the present position of W.A. racecourses. The presence of the bookmakers enables owners to often get a better price than if speculation were entirely confined to the totalfeator, while small punters, with the knowledge that they wiil get much the same price about a favourite as from the Ring, and a much longer one about any outsider, naturally support the machine. In New Zealand majiy of the racing clubs are still anxious to get rid of the bootmakers, notwithstanding tie big fees; they pay, but if ever the totalisator is installed either in New South \vales or Victoria it will probably give satisfaction to racegoers if the bookmakers are still allowed to ply their calling.

A writer in the "Sporting Chronicle" considers F. Wootton was harshly dealt with, and in commenting on the case, says: 1 —While we commend the stewards of the 1 Jockey Club for their desire to have nothing 1 but fair riding on our race tracks, it really i does seem to ns that In this case of Woot- '. ton's the punishment is unduly severe. That i the young jockey deliberately attempted to • foul Maher on Saturday last we do not i imagine even the American jockey believes. < That he tried to prevent Maher from com- i ing through on the rails, where Wootton : evidently thought Blaher ihad no right to I try to force an opening, is certain; but : Wootton, as he was entitled to do, had taken that position by crossing over to the rails after he had secured a clear lead . on St. Elroy, and no doubt he considered ■ it was Ms right to retain that place. It is true that after having gained the rails St. Elroy bore away from them, as many other horses do in similar circumstances, either from weakness in finishing or from ■ a dislike to racing in that position, but the lad was doing his utmost to win, and when he saw Maher's attempt to get up-inside he obeyed the natural inclination to bear back again into his own course, and so baulk Maher of the opening. In this proceeding we grant that the boy committed an error of judgment, . and laid himself open to punishment because of the risk • snch tactics involved, but "what we cannot believe is that he deliberately rode a foul race with the intention suggested by the wording of the objection. To our mind the punishment meted out to Wootton Is far more severe than is warranted by all the circumstances. Commenting on Neil Cow's victory in the Craven Plate, ,an English writer says: — Xeil Gow has ever been a horse of extraordinary finishes, and not the least amazing of these was that in which, he beat W&isfc Broom and Tressafly in the Craven Stakes. He was. contrary to expectation, sedate enough in the paddock, and also at the post. He is too big and lengthy a horse to make a really nimble beginner, but he got well enough away. Maher was content to keep him wel in lialnd alongside Whisk I Broom while Tressady and Counterpoise \ made the" running at no great pace. When half the journey had been made Counter- j poise dropped out, and Tressady was left I clear of Neil Gow and Whisk Broom. At j the Bushes, which nre reached when a little over a quarter of a mile remains to be covered, Tressady shot ont with a four or five lengths' lead, and with Neil Gow losing ground by floundering as he descended the hill, Whisk Brood took second place, t At that point Nell Gow appeared to be j badly beaten by both Tressady and Whisk ! Broom. But a furlong from home there came a magical change. In the Dip, Tressady suu , -' denly darted across half the width of the : eonrse to the far side. Then It was that i the ascent began, ond up the incline Neil j Gow went with sucii enormous strides that] he not only caught Whisk Broom immedl-1 ately, but he went past Tressacr. and won, pulling up, by three lengths, while Whisk Broom beat Tressady by a neck for second place. Neil" Gow's victory, after being so completely out of the race, was wonderfnl, but that applies only to his work in the final furlong, his display while the earlier seven furlongs were being covered j beiug disquieting. At the same time he | proved, ns he did when he won after being ■ left at Kempton and Doncaster last year, : that if only he be in touch ■ with his op- ' ponents at the commencement of tie lest furlong, it will be a wonderful bone that! can then best him. ' J

A rather interesting case was decided In Prance recently, when M. Arthur' '"VeilPicard ana Madame Lemalre de Villiers, the owner of the St. Lucien Stud, thrashed out a difference la the Court of Appeal. The Continental correspondent o" the London "Sportsman" says that M. A. YellPicard bought a yeatling, Lβ Slcambre at the Deaville sales for 440sovs. The sale was made under certain conditions and guarantees, and the buyer sent home the colt. He was surprised to learn from his trainer that Le Sicambre was a roarer. Calling In the veterinary surgeon, he was satisned that such was the fact, and writing to the breeder declared that he conld not accept the colt owing to the impossibility of racing or breeding from him. Ma-dame Lemaira declined to reopen the transaction, declaring that when the yearling left her stud he was all right in his wind. She lost her case. On appeal counsel for the defence argued that she could only be responsible in the event of her having been aware that the colt was really a roarer, and that, though the knowledge of ench a vice « easily obtainable for a racehorse It was not the same with an unbroken colt, who had never bad the saddle on him or been galloped. M. A. Veil-Picanl, unable tb prove thnt the colt had been galloped or had had the tackle on him at the stud, was unable to show that the colt was a roarer when he was sent up for sale, and has consequently been condemned to pay all expenses ana retain possession of iis purchase.

Dealing with the subject of "Roaring ia Racehorses, How to Cure Them," Mr C. Vlnoent Cotterell (brother of the "operator" named below) states: — "Let mc draw your attention to the fact that in the eighties of the last century Edward Cotterell, the surgeon who lived and practised at Bicester (England), was-the first to discover the cause of roaring, and wrote a book on the subject, which was published at 1/, and sold, amongst other places, on all the railway bookstalls. Edward Cotterell was the first to successfully, operate on horses for roaring. He took Baron Schroder's furnished house in Bicester^which was next to his own. solely for the stabling, -which; in a short time he had full of horses on which he operated for roaring. The furnished house remained empty for some time, but was eventually taken by the Right Hon. "Walter Long, .who used/to watch the operations, and can vouch for the truth of the statements, and that after the horses~ had recovered from the operation no sign was visible, and they could be passed -by any 'vet.' as sound In wind. I am away- from home, so cannot send you a copy of the book on 'Roaring,' but you can verify my statement by a visit to the British Museum. ' Edward Cotterell took special lessons from 'Galvayne,' when over In this country, to enable him to throw a horse alone, and not distress ov excite the animal unduly before the operation. Edward Cotterell came to London to practise surgery, and gave up operating on horses. He was soon elected lon the staff of three hospitals, and became I a very noted surgeon in n. few years, but, ! alas, he died from the effects of Influenza over eleven years ago." ■ — ■', ■

Opinions differ as to whether the Liverpool Grand National course is stiffer now. than in the past, but most of the-old-time cross-country jockeys will not -have --that It Is more formidable than in their day. The late King Edward's trainer, K. Marsh, is of opinion that, the task of getting a. horse round is not as difficult as when he rode over it about thirty years ago, and recently replied as follows to an enquiry from Mr A. F. Meyrick on tlje subject:— ' ' " : "

"Dear Mr Meyriek, — The Liverpool fences, in my opinion, are safer to jnmp now than they were when I used to ride. For one reason, any part of the fence now is jumpable, but in my clay, in many places, the old growth of yeara'- standing were left in them, and it was impossible tojump them, so one had to pick his way to several of the fences. Again, at' that period most of the course- was ploughed ■ land, making it much more difficult for the horses to get out of. Of the present course, however, I do think that the. first and last fences should be altered by cutting them to lean away from the horses. My reason for that is that old horses,. having had a stiff preparation for the race, do not get irarmed to their work until they Save gone about a quarter of a mile; besides which, they rattle along to the first fence,. It is that which gets horses out of their-balance, and that naturally does not give them, time to get up to jump at big fences to start with. Then as to the final fence. That, I-think, should be the same, for after.going .more .than four miles and jumping thirty-two fences, it is, indeed, hard lines on owner, trainer, and jockey to come to grief at' the final obstacle, simply not because the horse had not jumped at it, bnt because he simply; brushed it. — Yours truly, R. MARSH." On the same subject T. Cannon wrote to Mr Meyrick that he .thought the fences are now too high, especially the .first'twor or three. .. . .-, ; -..._■

A writer In the Otago "Witness" pens the • following: — During the, past week, two letters have arrived from the North. Island for publication in these columns/ and the gist of one is embodied in this note. The opinions expressed in both clearly' evidence what has been very obvious for' Some time, and that is a more stringent - control of racing is very desirable if the tone of the Turf is to be maintained It really, appears that the good done ■by one clnl» is counteracted by the-lscrity -of'-another* and in the writer's opiajton no permanent improvement will be effected nntil some arrangement is made whereby there will be a continuous control of our racing. Hi*, der the present circumstances no racing club concerns itself — at least, to"'ajjy.es- , tent — with, what transpires •at meetings i held by other clubs.. Strange to say, some racing stewards express strong opinions as to what takS* place on courses other than their own, but maintain a Sphinx-like silence as to the sometimes questionable doings on their own. It, is obvious at times that stewards are "not looting for trouble,' , as they are ■desirous of their partlculaE gathering passing off es smoothly as possible, and this lamentable state of affairs is in a great measure responsible.for existing evils. It is easily understood ,-why : •racing stewards do not always exercise a rigid observance of racing law. They have other things to attend to besides racing, and consequently the eport suffers. Even the writer passes over little happenings at times in order to avoid the appearance oE continually writing in a fault-flndijfg spirit. It is fairly easy to criticise, but the remedyis difficult to find. That Is not always so in racing. At times the faults are very ap-. parent to racing men, but they appear to escape official recognition, and evenwhea somebody is carpeted the guilt-correcting whip is not brought down hard enough to. make a suitable warning as to otXer offenders. But the greatest trouble of all ie the steward who doesn't know and won't be told. They are the brakes on the wheels of progress. The correspondent who is quoted below has been recognised as one of the most capable riders in New Zealand, I and has always been right In the Inner • circle. He speaks from experience and a clear knowledge 'of the subject, and the I tone of both letters accentuates the fact 1 that it Is really time racing stewards wok* lup to the necessity of a more rigid control of the sport. The correspondent says: -r"They have stopped mc betting. I send r pnt a moderate torse in a good field, and 1 Bβ walks in. wtVjreas I start a far better one in a poor field, and lie i-s never seen. An« !if yon ask your jooeey what happens* j blm" he can't tell you. The jockeys fire aa I thnt they term 'getting even , on each other. : And where the steward doesn*t know any- ' thing, If all those who don't know wner* j they are, or who were interfering with i them in a race, were made to stand down ! for a term, they would soon learn to know. I 1 always) etrald tell who trouble:! mc, anS j I could ride as well as any who are at it , i now." ■ -

Charles Thornton and Arthur Shorter, both aged twenty, have been sentenced at liiverpool to sis months' hard" labour ! for stealing £90 by means of a trick i from an office boy. They spent the '■ money visiting skating rinks wtH young women. They had also been responsible , for no fewer'than eighty btirgterieft is I Birkenhead.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AS19100528.2.108

Bibliographic details

TURE GOSSIP, Auckland Star, Volume XLI, Issue 125, 28 May 1910

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2,970

TURE GOSSIP Auckland Star, Volume XLI, Issue 125, 28 May 1910

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