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TURE GOSSID

<Bx WHALBBONBJ

In America, when a racing owner has he mischance to have a good horse claimed a a selling race, his boon companions who jsed to play marbles with him say: "My! le's lost his china alley now!" Mt. C. T. Clni, a Chinese sporstman, had he mount on his own representative, Hes.eras Magnus, in the Oakfleld National iurft Flat in England recently, but he had iot much opportunity of showing his ability n the saddle, for Hesperus Magnus was iways tolling In the rear. After touching on the subject of the egislation which debars the importation >f -loises from India to Australia, a Calcutta exchange adds: "India might, were >he so disposed, retaliate upon Austra'ia md demand that all -torses coming from there .should be compelled to. undergo a severe period of quarantine. 'Tick' and .kin diseases are by no means uncommon amongst horses landed in India from Australia, but there is no prohibitive legislation, and India takes the Colonial horse _n trust, asking no questions and hoping to be told no lies!" The Hon. Thomas Reibey, of Tasmania, who can claim the distinction of being one >f the oldest turfites In the Commonwealth, never permits his Jockeys to use either whip or spur, and, according to many' race followers in the tight little island, has thereby lost Innutnerahle races which he aright have won. One day during his absence, -.--wever, his trainer started a horse In eacli of three races at Carrie—, and, per medium of whip and spur, enabled the followers of the stable to land a pile of money. A few days later the veteran sport heard that his orders had been disobeyed, with the result that the trainer aud all the -table hands were summarily dismissed. The Johannesburg Autumn Handicap, of loOQsovs, run on April 26, was won by J. Gard's I___nteglos, by Knight of Malta— Dear Heart, Cheltenham being second, and Courtier third. The Goldfields Handicap on the second day was annexed by Crossjar, by Carbine—Saintfield. The Transvaal Handicap, two miles, on the third day, resulted in a dead heat between Crossgar and Make Up, and as the owners would not divide, the horses were brought out after the last race, with the result that after running together the full journey, and fighting out a desperate finish, the judge was unable to separate them, and again declared a dead heat. Both horses and riders received a great ovation on returning to scale. l_e dual dead heat was an unparalleled performance in South African racing. The impression that the stock of Ladas s delicate and flighty may have been due :o the fact that Lord Rosebery's own maxe_ tvere not exactly the soit to mate with o dorse so finely bred and so high y strung (says an English. writer). Some indication of this was given when one of them. Corstrophine, who dlt fered from the others in having a complete .utcross through her sire, Foxall, produced Costly Lady to Ladas. This was a hardy filly of high class, and an excellent stayer. It has also been against Ladas that until this season Lord Rosebery has not advertised his stallions. It is quite a mistake to suppose that a subscription list fills automatically. It may be so for a season or two, when the memory of a horse's great victories on the Turf is till fresh in men's minds, but other and more recent champions soon begin to occupy attention, and it Is then that the older horse needs to be kept before the public by advertisements and other means. In certain quarters in England a deadset has already been made against Neil Gow for the t>erby (says an English writer). »-c.mc assert that the colt has turned badtempered when at exercise, and excessively fractiouß before he sets off in his gallops, while others, who have not seen the colt since he won the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster, openly state that he has made little or no improvement during the recess. With regard to the first assertion I cantruthfully state that Neil Gow has not "contracted a bad. temper." That he has now and again, prior to Mdher being lifted into the saddle previous to a gallop, been a trifle upset and skittish is true, and before starting off to gallop he has skipped about 6oure.i_.at, but this amounts to nothing .more than playfulness, the son of Marco— Chelandry, being a most light-hearted animal, and it is this which has by some been construed into vice. Then, again, it has been said that the colt appears to have become somewhat sluggish after he has gone a certain distance in his galtops. This, iv my opinion, Is a good fault; horses of this description invariably race and stay much better than pull-away, tearing goers. So far as action is concerned, I strenuously contend that Neil Gow, when roused up and fully extended, is without exception one of the finest and beat movers seen at exercise, on Newmarket Heath, all statements to the contrary notwithstanding. The controversy in the English papers ns to the cause of all the falls in the Liverpool <Jrand National continues, and the opinion expressed by a once-pr-ininent rider that some were due to the forward seat adopted by many of the present-day steeplechase riders in the Old Country is probably not very wide of the .mark. The jumps at Aiutree had been made sqnarer at the tops, and when some of the competitors attempted to go through them, as they had been accustomed at other courses, they bluudered, and in such case a jockey doing the "Tod Sloan" business could not save himself, let alone his mount. One effect of the Alntree falls has been to cause many writers to suggest that the jumps at the other tracks should be made stiffer, but the "Special Commissioner" says owners, trxdners, and jockeys would kick against any such step. The big fences at Aintree are accepted as part of the game, but they are not prepared- to countenance them elsewhere, and there is no doubt the same feeling would obtain in Melbourne against any of the suburban clubs making their steeplechase jumps as stiff as these to be negotiated at Flemington. The | writer I have quoted says that when Sandown Park was first formed the fences '. were .us big and upstanding as those at Liverpool, but consequent on the objections i raised by owners, trainers, and Jockeys, they were reduced, as -were those at Lingfield and Portsmouth Park, and yet the same men who objected to those fences would not hesitate at riding over the more formidable Liverpool obstacles. The gambling evil in West Australia has been the general topic of conversation amongst racing men there whilst the churchpeopie have also taken the matter up seriously. The acting Premier (Mr. F. Wilson) had two deputations to him on Friday, April 22, one being from the Council of Cnurches (Nonconformist) and the other from the registered owners. Of course, the religious people had a very strong case, and made good use of it. Ou the other hand, the owners also put forward a good plea iE favour of bookmakers being allowed on registered courses, and that was that there were not enough wealthy men racing horses here to enable the totalisator to be worked without having recourse to 'ihe bookmakers. It was pointed out that the odds as recorded ou the betting-machine could not be compared with those received from a bookmaker by an owner who backed his horse; for, whereas he may have averaged 6 to 1 with the bookmakers, the totalisator dividend might only be about 2 to 1. 'the owners also pointed out that if the bookmakers were done away with it would be a great biow to the horsebreeding industry here. On Mouday Mr. Wilson received, s i deputation from the Whippet Club of Kal j goorlie, who denied that there was toe much gambling carried on at 'their meetings i Later the unregistered owners and those . conducting the meetings had an interview. ! with the Minister. They contended thai 1 the unregistered meetings were as well conducted as the registered, and that there \va_ loss gambling on the events run at tb.li courses than on the registered. They trustee ' that the Government would control thi ! racing. Mr. Wilson, In reply to all the I deputations, said that it was not the in tentiou of the Governmeut to interfere witl I clean sport, but the gambling evil had as I snmed such proportions that It was ueces sary for some steps to be taken. The wholi 1 matter would be considered by Cabinet V is not known yet whether the W.A.T.C will wait upou the acting head of the Gov eminent.

__23j%W." the first bi S I s?_ssr£ i _3_?3v£ ; | SS-TfpwS ■ _o i_eep pace with the times 'If snm_thi__ isn't done the I_ncoln_m_:e be left in the lurch,' be __U_Ttg __i t?_S? "* SJ** eitra £500 to comeliom? - TVe'll get it from the ring,' he reniifSy v« T' round for it Will yon aSk _S _£__i *«_§. father of the present Mr W T Ford. • 7%2S, to "■*** J" 1 MForAwls delighted, saying be felt the race should hi ' - ' one thousand added, but the estate couil fe ZS^^^ 1 'It would make j our meeting,' he remarked. 'Well it shTii ?? m S e u rns was **■ eafi y matter. Steel r i ?o__f AfSl* rh d were the coll& 4 IS V. er mcc Mr F ord said: 'It's •" P'■! the best meeting by a long, long'way we ll have ever had. In future, _ thousand _hlil •• always be added to the Lincolnshire Hanoi: * cap. And we can now afford the money ourselves. The value was raised to £ISOO - a few years back." •»»•"»<« | Writing of the death of Ayrshire which 4 occurred recently, "Cot 1 sidering the reputation of Ayrshire as a sire. V one is struck with the luck that he a'l 1 fh! n £. enjoyea ' n ?J only at the-stud-but oa .'-. the racecourse. He was one of the bic-est " winners ever known, but in ordertoentbie >> him to achieve those victories the best 1 h»m! °/ h . s . ye _. had t0 go amiss. FiS- M: •bably Ayrshire himself was unlucky when, $ he failed to win the £5000 Whiteunride I Plate at Manchester. He started first I favourite and ran third, a hea? behind _■ CaHteverock, who in turn was a ;# hind Briar Root The latter was bg ''I those animals that every now and-gaSTare -i. born to perplex the students of public I form Her victory over Ayrshte seerue- A right enough, because soon aftearwardsthJ "\ latter finished behind Iht f followmg y<ar, in the One ThoisaS &_£ I eas was behmd Briar Root, wh-ch started; I at an outside price. In the St. Leger sSi- § 'breeze beat Ayrshire, the latter _t_rtW f f °„ the pSe d! ' i •_" /" anch ?ster they were.first anl 1 second, Seabreeze winning. A similar staie f at Kempton the following year f won, though the stable to •! have a better in Mehmion. In tte Oaks f for which Briar Root started favourite' I she never saw the way that 1 went. With regard to the career MAy? "I ™rjlr, the stnd ' he ™ s for nmny ye _S one of the very high priced lot, and he got ." I more than an ordinary average of winnfra I Considering, however, that dnrto" the I Sr i f~. w .°. ? a °asand Guineas, Derby, or I St. Leger, it is marvellous that he kent hii I place in the way he did." .■ Two seasons ago, when the young Australlan was pressing Maher very hard to The . riding and suspended for a tern Th» : Maher - Frank ™ s by '- Maher. Tnis circumstance made the case assume a character in which persrall ele- ■ ments might sway the decision (°avs t!£ ; in S .??„ r t lng - + JUdSe " ) - MSh « W_s ing favourite, and very popular. For several ' seasons he had been on top, and good for another. The youngster was °o<n£ and h S weII « and J f Maher mised 3 / f ad ,te there wonld be very little -J Ther _- was Steat rivaLry between Maher and Wootton, and thi. public tate" was v^teen 06 T ° r the i°^y P p r eh?ier S hil» Jl keen - In 'an evil hour the youngster fell under the barm, and Mahe- we_Tfc on and won. It was the opinion of many competent judges that FraSk was nS to w Th %*">™ he rode when th, foulSfft, CCU ? ed was a sour-tempered brute with a disposition to hang fn. Despite : S^,"Hf h efforts he hnn S In sufficiently to Maher opportunity for complaint, and itnr,! al ' d ? «PPor.nni_y for punishment. I'oul nding is the most serious charge thatcau be made against a jockey. WheS sltH fied as to the guilt of the culprit, the stewards should give no quarter. luWsfiretsvS pension, Frank was one of the lncMest w an innocent victim. Suspension" for a few weeks as a punishment for foul riding is a traves.y. It is a charge which adndts of no extenuation. After Wootton's suspension he rattled up a good score, but Maher was too far up In front for Frank to get up Last season the Australian caught Maher early, led him into the fifties, then drew away, and the flnish was a cakewalk for him. The boy had a dear. and. unlnter- - rupted run, so far as complaints were concerned, but an accident late, in the season penalised him a number of victories. This season the youngster was off again for tha premiership, but was stopped very, early, and again on the complaint of Maher The stewards expressed their sense of Wootton's - dastardly conduct by suspending him for two months. We write "dastardly conduct"advisedly, as this Is not Wootton's first offence. To award a suspension of twa months to a second offender charged with foul riding Is virtually an acquittal. .Frank, you are certainly no favourite of Maher-! but you are a first favourite' with the stewards, or by this you would have gone out for life. " - —- - ■.-■- .-.''.'. ~— ' : In reminiscences of the Gr___ Sational an E_aglls_i writer says.—. The average cross-conntiy course la from two and a-half to three" h-flea in length, and, judging by the condition of some of the horses when they finish, quita .nough, too. The National Hunt SteeDie> -hase, at Warwick, is four miles- In lengt-i, and the Slow-and-Sure Steeplechase is rnai over .a similar distance. At Puhchestown, the centre of Irish steeplechaslng, there axq races of four miles, and the National Hunt Cup is four and a quarter. ' But the famous A_ntr.ee course Is longer t-i-ifi that used for any other steeplechase In this country—lndeed, the longest, we believe in the world, and also much the most severe. The obstacles are higher and bigger than any others, the fences stronger, the water-Jumps wider. It is a course over whicl, -only j_ • very good horse can stay, and more animals come to grief in the Grand National than In any other race of the kind. Even the ordinary thorn-fences are diificult. They. - are so big that from the take-off side only a tall man can see over them, and so stiff that, if a horse fails to jump fairly.clean, the chances are that he takes a somersault. One of the worst obstacles is Becher'a Brcok, which is the sixth fence going from the stands, the spot at which the horses make the first turn to the left. "In IS3O, tho year in which the first Grand National was run, Captain Becher rode,a horse.called Conrad. He was leading when they cams to this particular jump, which 'then consisted of a stiff rail, a hedge, and beyond it a sixfoot brook. Conrad made a mess of it, and, failing to rise high enough, caught on the top rail, broke it, and went neck and crop into the water on the far side. His rider fell clear and lay quiet, while Lottery and several other horses, jumping at the same place, went right over him. When they were safely past, he lumped up, remounted, and galloped after. Ever since that particular jump has borne his name', and is knowa to-day as Becher's Brook. A large number o£ the entrants for the Grand National usually survives the first round. It is iv the st-cond that falls become frequent. Most accidents are caused by horses getting blown but a certain number results from collisions.' These conditions are usually due to one or both of the colliding horses being dead beat. The field being nearly always a large one, it takes good riding to avoid collision. Frequently, when a horse comes down, and gets rid of his rider, he will pick himself up aud go on. You will nearly always sc-e two or three riderless horses running alongside the competitors. About twelve or thirteen years ago one of these loose horses took every jump with the utmost precision, and, galloping through the ruck, headed aIR rivals, and oassed the post a winner. This particular animal had been heavily backed to win the race, it is a good proof of the difficulty of the Aintree course that you can usually get 2 to 1 against any particular horse whicii you like to name completing the course, no matter how good a fencer. Two years ago. . ' of tweottv-iour starters, only eight. _lHisb«_. the course, and one of these—Kirkiand, a former winner-fell at the last fence aad ; : was remounted. There were two rero- irK able iucidouts in that 1008 ra ?. e - Ri ;^' so m winner, was originally a trati horse and sold ielac d e Md S^Sgg

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TURE GOSSID, Auckland Star, Volume XLI, Issue 119, 21 May 1910

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TURE GOSSID Auckland Star, Volume XLI, Issue 119, 21 May 1910

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