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POLICE COURT.

(Before Mr C. C. Kettie, S.M.) THE DRUNKARDS. Richard Gilfoylo, an aged man, who I was found in a drunken condition, bruised and battered, and was remanded for a week for medical treatment, looked still rather the worse for his spree this morning. Meantime the police have made inquiries as to his admission to the t'ostley ! Home, but the authorities will not take 1 him, chiefly on the ground that lie is addicted to drink. The Magistrate would not take the responsibility of turning him I adrift in his present weak and destitute I condition, and remanded him for another I week. Sidney Forrest, a remittance man, i went to the police station about a week I ago, apparently very drunk, and asked to l>1! locked up. Since then he has been in 1 hospital suffering from fits. He was con- • vietod and discharged, and ordered to pay expenses, £2 9/0. Andrew Arthur White had a fright- ; fully bruispil and battered face, which he came by on Saturday night. The charges agninst him were that he was disorderly while drunk in Queen-street, that he used obscene language, find thnt he assaulted a constable. His conduct was that of a lunatic on Saturday, and this morning he was not too reasonable, a fact which probably influenced the magistrate I in his decision to remand him for a week. William Henry Miller was charged with drunkenness, with breach of his prohibition order, and with being an habitual drunknrd. He was convicted on all charges, an<l ordered to come up for sentence when called upon. Frederick Thomns was fined 10/. One first olFender ; forfeited bis bail (£1), and another was fined 5/. VAGRANCY. Carroll was convicted some [lays iipn on si charge that she was an incorrigible rogue, and remanded to give her Him , to consider whether ulie would j consent In go to the Mount Mngtinln Home rather than to gaol. This morning she was anxious to make a bargain with | the court as to how long she would be required to stay in the home. She was willing to go to the home for 12 months, but rather than go there for an indefinite j period, she would prefer to r:> to Mount Edr-n. The Magistrate would not treat with her. hut finally, when she consented to go to the home for IS months, sent her to the institution for that period. Michael Francis Rush, the old man whom the police found somewhere a week ago in a very flea some condition, came up agiiin this morning. "lie's been clipped, ami wnshed nnd scrubbed." Rnid SubInspector Ilendrey, ''but I don't think he is quite clean yet". Probably another week of boiling up would do him pood." The Magistrate thought so too. and =ent him back to Mount LMen for another week. I OBSTRUCTING THE FOOTPATH.! "He's a pupswr, I think," said a constable, describing a young nnm named .'ohn Ijovelcck. charged with obstructing i the footpath of Qupeu-street at the foot | of Vulcan lane. "A guesser?" said his | Worship. "They guess the horses that; don't win; I think thal's the idea." said Inspector Hendrey. "They aru in league I with the various bookmakers, and they ■ tell the fools that they find on race-j -curses ami elsewhere, what are the sure ; things." The evidence was to the effect j Hint""defendant is one of the gentlemen i wlio put in their days nt the foot of | Vulcan Lane, using the thoroughfare as a loitering place to look out for people who are inclined to bet. The magistrate said that defendant was one of the persons whose c"se the by-law had been framed to meet. Defendant was convicted and fined £2. THEFT. Thomas George Little pleaded guilty to a charge that on the 7th October lie stole two pairs of fish-plates, value 12/, the property of the Electric Tramway Company. These fish-plates, which weigh about one hundredweight each, were lying at the tramway construction works in liobson-street. The man took them to a, second-hand dealer's, but did not dis-j pose of them. His excuse was that he had no idea that they belonged to anybody. He was sentenced to 14 days' imprisonment with hard labour. lledley Martin, convicted some days ago on" a charge of theft from the premises of Messrs. Winstone and Sons, was sent down for 14 days. ASSAULT. William Spittlehouse pleaded guilty to two charges of having assaulted the woman who lives with him as his wife, and one of having assaulted Constable Matthew. Drink and jealousy were the cniiH-s assigned for his violent treatment of his wife. He was convicted of the assault on his wife, and ordered to iind a surety of £25 that he would keep the peace towards her. Unfortunately for accused he had previously been in trouble for assaulting a police officer, and the magistrate treated this affair as more serious. Accused was lined £5.

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POLICE COURT. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 248, 18 October 1909

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