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TURF GOSSIP

Colonel Hall-Walker sold eight of his Irish-bred yearlings 'to an -English syndicate last season for lO.OOOsovs, and the pick of the youngsters is said to be the colt Charles O'Malley, a son of that good St. Simon hire Desmond.

In view ot the imposts now awarded Bribery (says a Melbourne correspondent), D. J. Price feels that it Is useless persevering any further with him In Australia, and he Is seriously contemplating sending the Malvolio gelding to i"i__ia_d.

It is not often that a Jociey is twice publicly applauded in one afternoon in England, yet there was considerable handclapping when Wootton dismounted from Sealed Orders and _ispet— at Liverpool, th» second outburst causing the boy to break into an amused smile.

A rumour is current in Victoria that Mr. J. "Wren's course at Ascot is likely to be soon recognised by the V.8.C., and if it is done, a Saturday afternoon or two will be alloted to that club during the season. But there is a further rumour, and that is that race meetings at Ascot are likely to be placed in opposition to meetings of the proprietary clubs.

The crack English Jockey, D. Maher, has a wonderful record in connection with the National Breeders' Produce Stakes at Sandown, for of the last eight races he has ridden the winner five times. In 1902 he was on Rabelais (won). In 1903 he had no mount, In 1904 _• won ou Cicero, and again in 1905 he did not have a mount. The following year he won on Traquair, and, after missing In 1907, won in 1908 on Bayardo, and this year was again successful.

As showing the different standards of prices which obtain as between an excited and a purely business-like market, a London writer instances the two sales of the mare, Film, who was put up at the Cobham Stud three years ago with a foal at foot, and was purchased by Mr. William Cooper on behalf of the late Sir Daniel Cooper for 400gn3. Since then two of her progeny have run without winning, but, nevertheless, when again sent Into the sale-ring, with the late Sir Daniel Cooper's other mares, at Newmarket last month, when competition was at fever heat, she realised 2800gns, or, in other words, nearly six times the money which had sufficed to transfer her from Cobbam to the Warren Stud.

Aa editorial on "Gamming In France," in the "Paris Journal," gives some very interesting and instructive figures. In the summer at the seaside resorts and watering places, and In winter, principally on the Cote d'Azur and Nice and its environs (not including, of course, Monte Carlo), from November 1, 1907, to October 31, 190S, the enormous amount of 370,429.815 francs was risked on the tapis verts of Its casinos at baccarat and ecarte (279;_70.075) and petils chevaux (91,-59,740). The Government collects 15 per cent of the profits, which it disburses for charitable purposes. The clubf of Paris and other cities do not figure in these totals. The amounts risked there »re enormous, and also unknown to the statisticians, who deal only with the public games stnetioned and controlled by law. If you add to the above 304,000,00 francs received and distributed by the pari-mutuel at the races, you jret the tidy sum of 674,----429.515 francs risked at summer and winter casinos and on racecourses, upon which the Government levies and disburses a percentage for the sacred cause of charity.

When a man wins a race with a horse, and all the owners' friends and acquaintances, and the friends' friends and acquaintances, and the acquaintances' acquaintances and friends, the trainers' friends and acquaintances, etc., the Jockey's friends and acquaintances, etc., the stable boys' friends and acquaintances, etc., and their sisters, cousins, and aunts are not in the Joke, then somebody's popularity is sure to drop a yard or two below zero. Some years ago a hard-headed racing man said to the writer that if three persons knew of a horse with a good winning chance in a race, experience of the game taught him to put the three units together and make it 111, and each additional unit has to be marked down In the same way: That's why the wise men in the racing world maintain sphinx-like silence, and keep their extra special information to themselves. They only tell, with a little air of goodnatured generosity, what la common property, and at times pass on the gossip of the racecourse as if it were a profound secret.—"Sentlner" In the "Otago "Witness."

English critics are very severe on Jockeys in the Old Country. In some places Maher was harshly criticised after he had easily won the Eclipse Stakes on Bayardo.

"There's a great Jockey," remarked one good Judge, as Bayardo passed the post.

"He deserved to be beaten for taking the risk of being shut in," was the counterblast ef several. As a matter of fact there was never the slightest danger of Bayardo being boxed In, though he was certainly behind Royal Realm, on the rails, Santo Strsto, and Your Majesty when they were running almost abreast when a quarter of a mile remained to be covered. Asked after the race why he kept Bayardo in the heels of his threo opponents while In the first half of the straight, Maher replied: ".Why not? Should I have come and won'my race three furlongs from home, and then perhaps have lost it again? Danger of being boxed In? Rubbish! When the other three drew almost into line I was some distance behind them. I gradually drew closer, and when 1 got to their heels ever co slight a deviation placed mc on the outside with a clear ran. In the meantime the others Were pacing mc and preventing toy horse staring up the coarse."

At the recent sales In England, American bred yearlings, as a whole, went very cheaply, and several of the brood mares sent up by Mr J. B. Haggin were almost given away. The "Special Commissioner," who has no liking for these importations, says the result was such as to almost dissuade Americans from sending blood stock to England for sale, and then added: "I think everyone who knows him likes Mr John Mackey, who manages for Mr" Haggin, but it Is Idle to pretend that these invasions on our bloodstock market are popular, nor can there be anything but injurious to the breed at large so long as Messrs Weatherby keep on admitting to the Stud Book anything and everything that comes over with an American Stud Book certificate, though it contains lines in its pedigree which are outside our book. They do not honour Australian Stud Book certificates in this way, and we have seen such a horse «s Newhaven sent back to Australia because MessTs Westherby weuld not Tegister him. In this esse there was no real reason to doubt that he was a pure thoroughbred, but this could not be proved in every detail. With American pedigrees you can generally show beyond possibilities of dispute that there are certain strains quite foreign to the English Stud Book. Yet we accept them and reject the colonies. A vast amount of harm was done to our breed by the acceptance of Foxhall alone, and now that the Jockey Club stewards really control the Stud Book, It is not unreasonable to nope that they will respectfully and carefully close it to all but genuine representatives of pure blood."

It is said that Messrs. August Belmont ! and Jas. R. Keene are so satisfied with ' the racing outlook in New York that they are going t o race more extensively there next year, and correspondingly reduce their English stables. Shortly before leaving America for England la"st month, Mr. Belmont, who is chairman of the American Jockey Club, was interviewed, and. In answer to a question, replied that after his experience of the previous six weeks, he should say racing was more popular In New York than ever. "The racing," he said, "is getting along very well indeed, and we are. going 'to have plenty of it. Even without betting, the sport will always be popular here and in Europe. It consists of three principles In one—courage, stamina, and the gambling spirit, which is the lowest in the scale." Asked if he thought that the public would be able to bet openly in the future, Mr. Belmont said, "There must always be racing, and if obstacles are put in its way the thoroughbred would degenerate or disappear. When you touch upon actual gambling in its relation to racing, you reach the lowest Stratum in the sport. The fact is, racing was created by the betting spirit, and not the betting spirit by rac-

IBs WHALEBONE.)

THE GIRLS OF "LONG AGO.

ing. If people are not able to bet o_ racing, they will quickly find something else to bet on. It is racing that makes the thoroughbred possible, and the raising of thoroughbreds is most important to the country. Taken altogether, I think the outlook for the American Turf is most favourable and promising. We have won the fight."

The English colt Bayardo has a chanet of establishing a record in the matter o_ winning stake money for a three-year-old. His grand total Is £20,500. made up as follows:—1908, New Stakes (Ascot), £1,517t National Breeders' Produce Stake's (Sandown), £4375; Richmond Stakes (Goodwood), £652: Buckenham Stakes (Newmarket), £1500; Rous Memorial Stakes (Newmarket), £730; -Middle Park Plats (Newmarket), £2505; and ' Dewhurst Plate (Newmarket), £1-177. This year Bayardo has won the Prince of Wales' StaTics (Ascot.), £2150; Sandriugham Foal Stakes (Sandown), £1724; and Eclipse Stakes (Sandown), £BS7o—a grand total for the two years of £25,800. It is interesting to not? In this connection that Verdun, the Freuci three-year-old, has up to the present Worf £26,717 in stake money. ' Bayardo's further engagements this year are in the Duchess of York Plate (Hurst), £1300; Breeders- St. Leger (Derby), £1350; Doncaster St. Leger, £6500; Doncaster Stakes, £500 aud sweepstakes; Champion Slakes (Newmarket), £100 and sweepstakes; Lowther Stake* (Newmarket Second October), £500 and. sweepstakes; Sandown park Foal Stakes.' £2000; Limekiln Stakes (NewmarketHoughton), £500 and sweepstakes; and Liverpool St. Leger, £700. Pretty .Po'lry. up to the end of her three-year-old season was credited with £31.402, having won the following races in 1903:—British Donni' nion Stakes (Sandown), £014; National Breeders' Produce Stakes (Sandown), £4357; Mersey Stakes (Liverpool), £fißo;' Champagne Stakes (Doncaster), £2010; Autumn Breeders' Foal Plate (.Manchester). £BSB- Cheveley Park Stakes (Newmarket), £S4o; Middle Park Plate (Newmarket)r £->475- Criterion Stakes (Newmarket), £906; Moulton Stakes (Newmarket), £427-.-In -1904 (three-year-old). Pretty Polly won the One Thousand Guineas (Newmarket), £3800; Oaks (Epsom), £4950; CoronationStakes (Ascot), £3000; Nassau btake* (Goodwood), £530; Doncaster St. Loger, £4625" Pnrk Hill Stakes (Doncaster), £1085; and Free Handicap- Sweepstaker (Newmarket), £400.

With regard to the new rule requlrim* horses to run thrice before they can be handicapped, it seems to mc, writes "Kapler" In the "Sporting and Dramatic News," that there is a good ground for argument. On the face.of It there is.no. controverting the fact that handicappers cannot properly weight horses about whom they know nothing. That is self-evident, and it is a charmingly simple and agreeablsIdea to run a horse three times In suitahla., welght-for-cge races co that it may be seen, Just precisely vzhat he is. If, all horse* belonged to Lord Durham and to sportsmeaof like mind, the only difficulty would ba to find the .races in which to run; but, aa was pointed out by other speakers, it would be far from an easy thing to discover such., races, because, indeed, programmes as at present devised do not contain a sufficient, number of them. This matter will have to be rectified if the rule Is adopted. I am not sure whether... It requires confirmation —and It will not ba, easy for Clerks of Courses to get good entries for such stakes, as I am sure Lord' Durham knows better than I do. As. -one of the speakers pointed out, choice would often rest between maiden plate.s, for which, horses would be apt to become disqualified by reason of winning, and selling plates, - entry in which might lead to the ownee being obliged to pay a high price to buy his horse in If he won, or to risk havlu_' it claimed.

• We want.good entries to keep thing*.going, and unless a number of welght-for* - age races are started—and it has been," observed that it will in all probability be extremely hard to fill them—entries are, Ir; think, sure to be adversely affected by the; -, new rule? Programmes would have to be *> remodelled. As Mr Leonard Brassey" . pointed out after making the calculation,-"- • out of 195 races at Newmarket last year—l... believe It was last year—there were only twenty welght-for-age events for three-year- " olds and upwards which closed within four... months of the day of running. It must not.however, be forgotten that a majority of the horses to be handicapped will have; run In welght-for-age races as two-year-olds.;

No doubt Lord Durham was to a great extent Justified in what he said about the American horses. His instances were carefully chosen; but he fully realised witti - what an extremely difficult task the hahdl-' cappers had been presented, and he would-, doubtless be surprised to find how littler Joyner agrees with him! Joyner Is not aa,' unprejudiced critic, but he told mc witli the utmost' sincerity that, though-he did" ' not In the least blame the handicappers,,:,he felt that they were very hard on most of his horses, and, indeed, when I was chit* ting to one of them in the plantation atthe First July, Joyner, whom I came across,...v expressed the same views to us—without,. I. am sure, altering the weights by an ounctv.' What is needed Is that the kandicappets should much more freely exercise the dls-v-"* cretion with which tbe Jockey Club readily ,' Invests them. They are in an exceedinglyawkward position, for the reason that they •' have many friends amongst owners and Sitrainers and men connected with different stables; at every meeting they associate intimately with these personages; and it'" would be horribly unpleasant for them it they put up a friend's horse some 141b after It had made a questionable exhibition.' '" The implication would, of course, be that., it had been stopped. If it had been, the . owner would be nil the more irate. There! are not many owners 'whose horses make. ' exhibitions of this sort; but there are a- . few, and the great essential in present-day. racing is to get at them and convince them" -' that the game Is a dangerous one. They do - not find it so, and consequently they play, :' It.

I was grimly amused at a little episode . , which occurred uot very long since. 'A) * horse was allowed to win after having been more, than once down the course. it. - started at a long price, just as if its recent , form had been approximately correct, amL - after the race, owner and trainer expressed, tolerably well acted astonishment, declaring that they had not backed it for a shilling.: - I happen to know a friend of the owner, a • man who goes racing only occasionally; ; and Is not well acquainted with the Turf. .. He completely gave the show away by telling mc what a good stake he had landed, the owner having very kindly taken ■"* the trouble to write and ndvlse him to back .„ the animal.

Now, the handlcappers, men of the' world, who see how things are going, mittht ' easily get to. know the truth of sucUt matters, and what they ought to do Is not to raise the horses of this sbrt of owner':.. 51b or 'fib, but to keep them conspicuouslywell at the top. It is difficult to imagine.' that they are not aware of the characters; of owners and the "hot stables" where X these games are played. As Mr Leopold- r de Rothschild said, handicappers "ought to know what owners ran their horses in a* ~* straightforward manner, and what owners- " ran with a view to handicaps"; knowing,'-,-., they ought to act on their knowledge.

Where are the girls that we used to 71 know; The pink-frocked girls of the long.ago? ""7" The little lass with the eyes of blue, And wind-tossed hair of a golden hue? „_ '" Have the fates been kind to her, telf

mc, pray, That maid I loved, in the bygone day?

Where is the maiden that stammered 50,.. _ The little lady called "pigeon-toe"? ~ The plain little miss with the pigtail ... •braid, The shy little girl who was half-afraid To speak to the boy that she didn't know ? . .7," Where are the sweethearts of long ago? -

I can see them all in my dreams to-day, Jennie and Marion, Ruth and "May, And I wonder often as I look back, Has the world been kind to that merry pack ?

Come, tell mc, seer, for I want to know, Where are the sweethearts of lon« a*a|

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

TURF GOSSIP, Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 211, 4 September 1909

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2,825

TURF GOSSIP Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 211, 4 September 1909

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