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THE ART OF SAFE BLOWING.

AN INSTRUCTOR'S LIABILITY. (By Telegraph.—Press Association.) WELLINGTON, this day. The Court of Appeal resumed this' «aornhig, the case taken bein<r R ex v Chas. Baker. This case was tried in •Wanganui in March last, nine .indictments, containing eight counts, char°-in" accused with counselling and procuring tihe commission of a crime, to wit, bur° gla-ry, with aiding and abetting, and with breaking and entering the premises with intent to commit a crime. The criminal act charged against accused was that he .wrote a letter to William Morris Scott at Wanganui, explaining how explosives ehould be used to open a safe. Two days later Scott and another attempted to commit .burglary in WaDgauui, were caught in the act, found guilty, and sentenced to imprisonment. The "jmy found that the letter written by accused was not written in reference to the Wanganui burglary, but with reference to a crime contemplated generally. It was contended by counsel that the writing of the lefter was not a criminal act, and that indictment, whli exception of counts charging participation in the specific crime tor which Scott v.-a d sentenced, which the jury had found accused had no connection with, no offence. Mr. Justice Chnpman resprved the question for the Couri of Appeal, and aho the que-Li..!i whether evidence taken ai the trial ot accused was sufficient to 6how when hn wrote the letter he knew of the contemplated burglary at Wanganui. The case is proceeding.

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THE ART OF SAFE BLOWING. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 92, 19 April 1909

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