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THE COUNTER REVOLUTION.

There seems to be very little doubt that, as we ventured to surmise last week, the mainspring of the Counter Revolution in Turkey is Abdul Hamid himself. That astute ruler, having had previous experience of Kiamil Pasha, evidently feels safer with him than with the more progressive and revolutionary of the Young Turks, and he has apparently worked upon the discontented members of the Reform party to secure the old Grand Vizier's recall. But beyond this it does not seem that the Sultan will be able to go. For the Counter Revolution, disconcerting as it must ba to the Young Turks, is in no senso a reactionary movement. The most remarks-bio feature of the whole situation Iβ bhr anxiaty displayed by the people of Turkey, irrespective of race and creed, that nothing Ehall happen to the Constitution. It is evident that the Turks, .Mohammedans as well as Christians, prize their newly-bestowed Constitution as an inestimable boon, and the reformers who directed the Revolution are not more in earnest about maintaining it than the priests, the theologians and the soldiers. One of the most significant episodes of the movement, so far, has been the descent upon Constantinople of a large body of troops who, having assured themselves that the Sultan was still aiive, and the Constitution was not abolished, at once retired peacefully from the capital. This curious mingling of personal loyalty to the Sultan with reverence for the new Constitution is surely a good omen; and though the rumours of another Armenian massacre may disturb the good feeling so recently established between Christians and Mohammedans, the whole country still presents the very remarkable spectacle of a nation still loyal to its sovereign, but in spite of racial and religious diflerenees, unanimously resolved to maintain and defend its rights and libeTties.

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THE COUNTER REVOLUTION. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 92, 19 April 1909

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