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PLUCKED HIS EYES OUT.

PRIEST'S REMARKABLE DEATH. At the Priory, Roehamptan, near Batnes, on Friday afternoon, February 26th, Mr John Troutbeck inquired into a case of most tinußunl character. The deceased was n patient named George Stacey, aged 50, a Roman Cathodie Driest. Dr. J. Morrison, resident medical officer at the asylum, produced the emergency order upon which, the deceased man was admitted on December IS. On Saturday at noon witness was called to him, aiid found him iv the bedroom grappling violently with two attendants. He was In bed. Both of his eye-sockets were completely empty, and his eycballe were flown on the floor a few feet away from where he had been standing. Witness called In additional medical aid, and everything possible was done for him, but death took place on the following Tuesday. Dr. Trevor, who made the autopsy, corroborated the evidence as to the orbits being empty. The eye cavities, he said, were perfectly healthy, showing that they had been carefully attended to. Beslde 3 the superficial reddening of the skin of both arms, where he had been restrained, there were no external marks of violence. The skull was natural and the cavities of the brain healthy. The brain itself was large and the convolutions normal. To the naked eye there was no evidence of disease of the ben In. ■Witness ngreea with the evidence of Dr. Morrison that death was due to heart failare following on exhaustion, accelerated by-the Injury. The Jury returned a verdict in accordance with the Coroner's suggestion that the deceased, being inaa, and not knowing what he was dolns, took bis eyes out, and that death followed.

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PLUCKED HIS EYES OUT. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 0, 17 April 1909

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