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OUR EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM.

SPEECH BY.THE GOVEENOfR. (Bj: Telegraph.:;— Press Association.) .-;.-■ .■■ =WAI\G-ANUI, Tuesday. The celebrations in connection- with Wanganui College were continued today; *• the "'afternoon Lord Piunket •laid-the" foundatipn. stone- of- the new college- buildings,"-vyfiich are to cost £30,000. In the course of his speech, the Governor eaid it was always a pleasure to iim to show by any means in his power his admiration for the educational system of'UeW'Zeaiand. Touching on the work of the (Mr. Empson),. his Excellency said: ''What he >»nd, I may add, Mrs. Empson- have done for this school most of my audience know far more intimately than myself; but upon what he has done indirectly for 2s r ew Zealand and for the Empire, I would venture a few words. 2vo educational department, no system of routine instruction, can produce whaß has been created in this school —that definite tone, that subtle' atmosphere, which distinguishes our public schools at Home. It is difficult to define it to those who. have not .lived in.it themselves, but it has been one of the most important factors in England's glorious past, and it is one of the main bulwarks we still have against decadence in our race. Pride in his school and its old ■traditions, and jealousy of its honour, respect for religion, for authority, for woinenkuid, scorn for low thoughts and mean actions, "and contempt -for the impure minded, the coward, the tuftJiuttter, or the purse-proud; add to" : that loyalty to his house, and a perfect worship, for those who have won their way into the school cricket or football team, larid-'you obtain the class of boy the English, public schools turn out in thousands—not perfect if you like, and wanting, I fear, too often in' scholarship, but, after all, as Emerson wrote: 'The world's great men Iflave not commonly •been great scholars, nor itg great scholars great men, but those who have been taught not to funk, not to squeal, and have learnt to play the game.' that is the spirit which, thanks to Mr. Empson and his assistant masters, the Wanganui School has so fully imbibed, and, as on 6' ~who believes it. has greatly assisted in making our Empire, I pay him and his school lnyTespectful tribute." The celebrations were concluded tonight, _when the annual ball was held. The. old boys' subscription list toward the .erection, of the new. chapel has now Teached over £ 2000.

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OUR EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 88, 14 April 1909

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