Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

PERSONAL NOTES FROM LONDON.

■ t (From Our Special Correspondent.) LONDON, March 5. I The sth of April is the centenary of birth of George- Augustus Selwyn, Erst Bishop of New Zealand, founder of -the Melanesian Mission, and subsequently Bishop of "Lichfield. But as April sth, will fall on Monday in Holy Week, which is regarded as an unsuitable day for a commemoration, it has been deaided to celebrate the Selwyn Centenary on or about St. George's Day, April 23. Whatever offerings may be made at the commemoration services will be divided between the endowment fund of Selwyn College, Cambridge, and the building fund of the Patterson Memorial Wing of St. John's College, Auckland.

The scheme for the observance of the centenary in the old diocese of Lichfield will include a special celebration of communion, special services and thanksgiving services in every parish church in the diocese, and meetings with addresses on Sehvyn's life and work. The sermon on Sunday, April 25th, in Lichfield Cathedral will be preached hy Bishop iWelldon, Dean of Manchester, on lessons of Bishop SeVivyn's life. Special prayers will be offered up for "the missions to the natives who dwell in the isles afar off, -which are the fruits of the labours of George Augustus, first Bishop of New Zealand, and are now i committed.to the church in the dioceses' of "Wellington , Nelson, Christchureh, iWaiapu,' Dunedin, Auckland and Melanesia." There will also be a prayer of 'thanksgiving "for the life and- work of George Augustus Selwyn, who by his ready obedience to the Divine call, my iis zeal, and enthusiasm, by his fearlessmess in the face of danger both by land and sea, and by a fixity of purpose from which no weakness of worldly desires ;COuld turn him aside, was enabled to establish the church on a firm founda- . tion in. New Zealand and the islands of j the Pacific."

In the diocesan letter announcing the forthcoming centenary, the Bishop of 'Laehfiteld naively observes that "the object of the commemoration is not primarily to collect money."

r The sixty delegates from Greater Bri•tain to the Imperial Press Conference will find a heavy programme of festivities awaiting them on their arrival here. LAn inaugural banquet will be given in their honour by the Daily Press of Great Britain on June sth, when Lord Burnham. "will' preside, and the speech of the evening, welcoming the guests, will be "made by the Earl of Bosebery. The banquet 'will take place in the Hall of iMusio, at the Imperial International Exhibition, and it is expected that the hosts will' number close' upon 1000. On Sunday, June 6, the visitors will be

the guests of Lord Burnham, at Hall Bam. Next day a luncheon will be given at the House of Commons by members of both Houses who are associated with literature or journalism, and in the afternoon the delegates will be received by the Prince and Princess of Wales at a garden, party at Marlborough House. On Tuesday. June 8, an official banquet will be given by the Government, with the Earl of Crewe in the chair, and

on "Wednesday there will be a reception iscrfoU alA..tJie. - Mansion House, "given by the Ti»Td Mayor. Sir Balfour " -will preside at a luncheon to "be given by the Constitutional Club on the following day, and in the evening the Duke and Duchess of Sutherland will give a reception at Stafford House.

On tbe invitation of Mr Haldane a day is tr spent by the visiting editors at Alders'ot, where the ?"jests will be able to see something €_ the British army, and on Saturday, siine 12, the ■week will conclude with a visit to the fleet, as guests of the Admiralty. On the following Monday, Lord Northcliffe will entertain the delegates at luncheon at Sutton Place, Mr C. Arthur Pearson ■will give a dinner at Ranelagh. and an afternoon will be spent at the Horse Show, on the invitation of the Earl of Lonsdale.

On the completion of the stay Tn\j London, the colonial delegates will be I taken to a few of the most important i ■commercial centres of England and Scotland, as well as to a few of tbe historic | and picturesque parts of the kingdom as far as time will permit. The commit- j tee is now busily mapping out'this tour, | Which will be by no means the least important part of the visit.

The mornings of the week in London will be spent in a series of conferences and discussions on subjects affecting the Press of the Empire and Imperial interests, the details for which are now being arranged by a sub-committee, consisting of Messrs J. A. Spender, E. M. M. Grigg, E. B. Iwan Muller, Alfred Robins, J- St. Loe Strachey, and Harry E. Brittain (hon. secretary), and the Foreign, Office have kindly placed a room at the disposal of the committee for the purpose of these conferences.

Lieut. H". T. C. Knox, organising lecturer for the Navy League, who is now on his way Home from a lecture tour in New Zealand, says in a letter to the Home papers that throughout the whole Dominion, from Auckland to the Bluff, he found the utmost enthusiasm for the navy and the work of the Navy League. He adds that he received the most whole-hearted support from the people and the Press.

Recent callers at the High Commissioner's office:—Mr F. W. Calverley I (Otago), Mi and Mrs J. D. Milton' (Canterbury), Mr D. Grant (Whangarei). Mr P. Gordon "(Masterton), Mr D. j E Davis (Hawke's Bay), Mr C. D.I Lightband (Wellington). Mrs Sidney Pluminer (Miss Mary Whitelaw, Auckland) , Mr John Poden (Timaru), Mr W. Dymock (Napier), Mrs and the Misses Wilkins (Auckland), Mr and Mrs C. Clayton (Marlborough), Miss A. Brandon (Wellington). Mr and Mrs Norman Tltz-Herbert (WanganuH, Mr Leslie White (Auckland), Mr Eaymond F. McIntyre (Christchnrch), Dr. and Mrs Hams, Miss Isaac.

In view of the Imperial Press Conference to be held fn London during the coming summer, a meeting was held this week of members of all parties in the House of Commons who are or have been associated with . journalism and literature. Sir Gilbert Parker presided, and it was decided that the conference should at some convenient date be entertained at luncheon by members of the House thus" associated with journal, ism and literature j and a committee was iormed, consisting of Sir Gilbert Parker,

Mr T. P. O'Connor, Mr Phillip Sno-w- ---' gen, with Mr P. W, Wilson as honorary j secretary. Ths response to the circular

: poEsening this meetiag was of a very ;. pneeuraging' charade?, member fjisnlay* I |ng the. pKisi approval e-f" the „ jragesal, .___ __ •_ 7

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
1,111

PERSONAL NOTES FROM LONDON. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 87, 13 April 1909

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working