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The weather forecast of the Rev. D. C. Bates (Government Meteoroligist) for 24 hours from l) a.m. to-day is as follows:—"Northerly strong -winds to gale; rain probably heavy; rivers risinc; glass fall."

A trap accident, which might have had serious results, occurred near St. Benedict's Church, below East-street, early last evening, when Mr. Charles French and a party o-f six were thrown out on to the road through one of the .back straps of the trap breaking. Fortunately, no one was seriously hurt, though Mrs. French was severely shaken, and had to be attended by Dr. Anderson. Strange to say, beyond the breaking of the strap, no damage was done either to the hfi-ge or.trap, though the frightened animal bolted down Upper Queenstreet and Karangahape-road. round Pittstreet corner and down to the bottom of Hobson-street, and then doubled ba-ek up Albert-street, where it was caught. The horse was outside the shafts all the time it was running away.

"We have a great many examinations in New Zealand, and some people call them evil, and evil only. I agree that it is desirable there should be as few as possible, but so long as we have so man}- things to qualify for, competitive examinations must be held."—Hon. Geo. Fowlds, Minister of Education.

On Thursday afternoon the Minister for Education (Hon. G. Fowlds) presented Miss Lenora M. Sutherland, of the Onehunga School, with a plaque for her essay on "What does the Nation Owe to Nelson and his Sailors?" The plaque contains copper from Nelson's old flagship, the Victory.

Only the smartness ,of engine driver George Evett saved Alfred Lloyd from death or severe injury on Thursday night. Lloyd, a young man employed in Mr. G. Anslip's str/i!Te.s at Onehunga, was travelling by the 1.1.10 train to Greenlane. On passing the Ellerslie racecourse, the train slowed down, and Lloyd jumped off, alighting on the down line,'not noticing the train from town which was coding along. The driver put the brakes on hard and averted a fatality, but Lloyd was caught by the cowcatcher and knocked down. He escaped with a badly braised thigh, and a scalp wound nearly lOin long, Dr. Clark attended to the injured man at the Ellerslie Railway Station, and he was taken to the Ellerslie Hotel for the night. In the morning he was able to be removed to his home at Onehunga, where his recovery is progressing satisfactorily.

A complimentary concert will be tendered to Madame Casier at the Choral Hall on Monday. April 19, when a choice musical programme will be contributed by Auckland's leading artists.

Speaking at St. Patrick's Cathedral yesterday morning, Bishop Lenihan deplored the growing tendency of a great number of people to regard Good Friday as a day for amusement. It was, indeed, sad to see people proceeding to picnics and other amusements on this day, which should be regarded by all Christians as a day of sadness and mourning. A man named E. Edlington met with a peculiar accident in the Taumarunui Timber Company's bush on Thursday. While he was in the act of taking "a wire rope ofl' a log, a tree fell across the rope, causing Edlington to be tossed in the air. He fell on a log, and fractured ills kneecap. Edlington was conveyed to the local hospital.

A young Native had a rather narrow escape from being killed at Taumarunui whilst mustering cattle. A bull whicli had a decided objection to being driven from his pasture to a slaughterhouse, on being hit with a stock whip, rushed at his assailant, and put one horn through the side of a horse mounted by the Native. The horse was taken a distance of three miles, and died next morning. Upon examination, it was found that the left lung of the horse was badly pierced.

"I saw that Island first when it was neither night nor morning," wrote RobPrt fy.iuis Ste> enson in ore of his stories t.f the South Pacific. " The land breeze blew in our faces, and smelt strong of wild lime and vanilla: other things besides, but these were the most plain. Here was a fresh experience; <?ven the tongue would be strange to us; and the look of those woods nnd mountains , and the rare smell of them renewed my blood." From this region, to him one of such enchantment that he rests there in a spot of his own choosing, the later Scotch wizard, a fanciful wanderer where he would, found a spell of earth, sea, sky and changeless summer that held him fast Ui Qib'tiitH-of his days. Not so long ago the l'aciiic seemed to be the remotest part of the globe, and tlu? fabled islands, little known, were peopled with warlike cannibals. Times have changed, and now peace and goodwill reign supreme in the Islands of the South Seas, the storied islands of perpetual summer. So more enchanting, heatlhgiving and instructive trip can be enjoyed by the New Zealand public than that offered by the monthly sailings of the Union S.S. (_'o.' s splendid new steamer Tofua, Atua, and Navua. During last winter large numbers availed themselves of the opportunities of seeing these beautiful islands, and were charmed and delighted with their experience. The Union to. announce the opening of th« tourist season this year by the Tofua, leaving Auckland on the 27th inst., and already a number of berths have been booked by her and by subsequent steamers.

At Thursday's night's meeting of the Birkenhead Borough Council, Cr. Walluce asked the Mayor (Mr. Alex. Keyes) to allow himself to be nominated for another term of office. He said that he felt at the present time it was especially important that the Mayor should con tinue to hold oflice for another term, owing to the important road improvements being effected and the negotiations for a water supply from Xorthcote. He felt that he was voicing the opinion of a large majority of the burgesses of Mirkenhead in asking the Mayor to allow himself to be nominated for another term of office, (.'rs. Kay. Taylor, Pitt, Hadfleld, Skeates, and Clements also spoke in support. 'Mr. Keyes, in reply, said he felt that the progressive policy they were carrying out was approved by a large majority of the burgesses o-f the borough. Whilst not himself approving of any monopoly of the mayoral chair, if it was the wish of the burgesses, he was willing to allow himself to be nominated for anothefterm, at *t\e close of which he hoped they woiifi have concluded satisfactory negotiations for a water supply for the district, whu'h he considered one of the most urgent requirements of the borough.

Only five of the present members of the Gre\- Lynn Borough Council have decided to seek re-election—namely, Councillors G. J. Garland. W. J. Holdsworth, J. H. Muldoon, \\". H. Murray, and H. Sehofield. These gentlemen have formed a ticket with Messrs. George Baildon, H. T. Buckley, E. liewcastle, and J. A. Warnock. Messrs. Baildon and Warnock have previously been members of the Grey Lynn Council. It is, however, cer tain that there will be other candidates, so that an election will be necessary. Mr. A. Donald, who for IS years has been a member of the Council, does not intend to seek re-election. Mr R. Entrican notifies that he will be a candidate.

The new Native School, which is being erected by the Porirua /Trustees at Otaki, is now nearing com/lotion. It is expected that the work /ill be finished in June, several weeks in advance of the contract time. The buildings consist of a schoolroom to seat 100 pupils and a house for 20 boarders with rooms for the principal. The Trustees, as will be seen in our advertising columns, are now advertising for a principal to take duties at the beginning of August.

The boxing mat in this evenings sports edition, including as it does a snappy account of the featherweight championship of the world in Xew York, and a stirring match in London, will be found of great interest. A varied selection of sporting matter of' general interest besides results is arranged for this issue.

The conference of the Churches of Christ enthusiastically passed a resolution expressing pleasure that a society had been formed in Auckland under the name of the Christian Unity Association. The hope was expressed that it might lead to the visible union of all God's people.

The Antarctic exploration ship Xinirod will leave Lyttelton to-day for Sydney direct. She will return to England from Australia, via Cape Horn. Mr. S. Richardson has joined the Ximrod as second officer. He was formerly an officer in the service of the P. and O. Company, but came out from Home in the service of the Union. Steam Ship Company. Until a few weeks ago he was third officer of the Waihora.

Speaking to a reporter, Mr. J. A. Hanan, M.P. for Invercargill, expressed his unqualified approval of the course taken by the Government in stopping the work on the Lawrence-Roxburgh railway. • "Records of Parliament," said Mr. Hanan, "show plainly that the original intention Was to construct the railway from Heriot to Roxburgh. A section of that railway was taken as far as Edievale, and then, for reasons yet to be disclosed, work was stopped at that point. 1 regarded the Lawrence-Rox-burgh proposal as a shameless waste of public money. The other route was shorter. It lay through good agricultural country, and construction work was easier. The Lawrence-Rosburgh line was an unwarranted item of expenditure, and any fair-minded person, after going over the rival routes, must admit that it was the duty of the Government not to proceed further on the route authorised. Sir Joseph Ward should be commended for his action in stopping the work, even at this late hour, as by doing so he prevents the Dominion from being burdened with a line which would ;be permanently unpayable."

At a meeting of the Lvttelton Habour Board, Mr. T. E. Taylor,'MjP., moved: — 'That the Board urges the Government to abolish the present antiquated method of nominating members of harbour boards possessed by various local 'bodies, and give Parliamentary electors of the Dominion power to appoint all members of harbour boards of the Dominion." The motion was rejected in favour of the following amendment:—"That the question of the method of electing members of harbour .boards is outside the province of the board, being more or less of a political nature, .and the Board, therefore, prefers leaving the matter in the hands of the people to deal with through their representatives in Parliament, that being the proper constitutional procedure."

Hie Minister of Education, Hon. George Fowlds, says that the people of Auckland have never taken the interest in higher education which they should hsve. They were not as keen as the people of other places, and Auckland's secondary schools were not filled so well. However, he thought that the University would be better attended if there was a better "building, to which end he would be glad to assist.

A man in the Police Court' this movfling expressed the opinion that Auckland was very poorly off in the matter of accommodation for men who were about the. streets looking for work. Mr Kettle, the presiding Magistrate, said he quite agreed that it would be a very good thing indeed if there could be some place where men out of work could go and be found when they were wanted. His Worship went on to say that he would make one more effort to see if something could not be ddne to accomplish such a desirable tiling.

Mr H. Bradney has given notice that at next meeting of the Harbour Board he will move: "That the secretary be instructed to prepare a statement showing the number of existing contracts between the Ferro-C'onerete Co. and the Board, the amount paid on each contract, and the progress made."

Mr. P. J. Xerheny notifies his candidature for a seat in the City Council. A meeting of Mr. Nerheny's friends and supporters will be held in the Oddfellows' Hall, Cook-street, on Wednesday next, the 14th inst., at 8 p.m.

After a hard day's work when your head aches "fit to split," remember yon can get quick relief by taking a wafer of Steams' Headache Cure. Twenty million people now use it. 1/- a bos.

Sple.ndid selection of ready-to-wears just opened. 5/11,6/11,7/11, to'2s/6. The smartest and daintest novelties in millinery. Leading shapes, styles and colours at McCullagh and Gower's. — (Ad.)

Don't you think our tie displays are great? Miles and miles of designs and colours. We have them from 6d. to 2/6 each. Geo. Fowlds.—(Ad.)

Coast and Jackette. —A very large variety of stylish- lines from leading manufacturers. Samples. Only one of a kind. Plain cloth, prettily trimmed nnd cut, 29/9, 45/, to 7gns. Others, 14/11 up. —McCullagh and. Gower, importers.— (Ad.)

Have you bought 3 r our new hard hat? Then let us fit you. Try our black derbies at 9/6. ' Geo. Fowlds.—(Ad.)

Per s.s. Tokomaru, big shipment of gloves. Kid. all colours. 2/U, 3/11. 4/11 up; long fabric, in green, pale blue, lielio.. pink. etc.. 2/11 pair: short do., 1/11, 2/6. McCullagh and Cower for gloves.— (Ad.)

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Auckland Star Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 85, 10 April 1909

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