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The following weather forecast is supplied by the Rev. D. C. Bates for 24 hours from 9 a.m. this day:—"Westerly moderate to strong winds. Glass little movement." ,

The "Star" will not be published on Friday next (Good Friday). Advertisers should make their arrangements accordingly.

The Auckland Choral Society's second concert of the season, 1908-9, consisting of Coleridge Taylor's "Hiawatha," parts 2 and 3, will be given in the Choral Hall on the evening of Tuesday next. The soloists are Mrs M. Hamilton Hodges, soprano; Mr SI. Hamilton Hodges, bass; M. W. Aspinall, tenor. The final "rehearsal tajces place this (Tuesday) evening.

Is a man too old at 85? The recent rearrangement of the Civil service, and the long list of officials who have been retired owing to .the fact that they have reached the age at which the State has decreed they must vacate their positions, reopens a question which is peculiar to the strenuous age in which we live. Those who would answer the question in tn*e negative will find in to-morrow's issue of the ''Weekly Graphic" a very strong argument in support of their contention in an illustrated article giving an account of some of the great achievements of men who refused to consider themselves out of the race simply because they had reached the shady side of 60. There are some very fine illustrations in the issue, the subjects touched on including the Governor's tour of the East Coast, mission life ia Fiji, opening up the Urewera, people who are prominent in the public e .ve, cyclonic storm at Lyttelton, Wellington public houses which lose their licenses next June as the result of the carrying of No-license in Wellington South and Wellington Suburbs.

"The a.s. Manuka will leave Wellington for Sydney on the night of Bth instant, not earlier than 11.30 p.m., in place of usual time on Friday, 9th idem. The Suez mail usually closing here on Thursday evening, will now close on Wednesday, 7 th."

The National Defence League have decided to call another public meeting to consider the question of universal military training on Wednesday, April 14th. At a meeting of the general council of the league yesterday it was resolved, "That while congratulating the Government on its desire to introduce a national system of defensive training, as foreshadowed in the Premier's speech of Friday Inst, the National Defence League, supported by the great body of the public, believes that nothing short of the universal and compulsory military training of the youth of the country can prove effective for the defence of the Dominion."

The plaque presented by the British and Foreign Sailors' Society, of London, for the essay competition on "What the Nation Owes to Nelson and Sailors," and which was awarded to iliss Leonora M. Sutherland, of Onehunga, as the author of the best essay frjm the North Island, will be presented to the winner at the opening of the, Auckland Girls' High School on Thursday afternoon. The Hon. George Fowlds, Minister for Education, will make the presentation.

Newmarket has gone ahead a great deal of late. New business premises have sprung up all along the main thoroughfare, replacing the old buildings, end a new post office has been erected. It is felt now that a bank is needed, and the Borough Council intends to see what can be done in the direction of supplying the require m.e.nt. Councillor Teed brought this matter up at the meeting cf the Council last night. The other councillors agreed with him that an institution of the kind was badly wanted, and were unanimous in the opinion that they should as a body move in the matter.

A special meeting of the Cambridge High School Committee was held last evening (Mr. John London presiding) to appoint a head teacher for the secondary department, rendered vacant by the resignation of Mr. Ransom, appointed to the Thames School. The Education Board submitted three names—viz., Charles Meredith (Paeroa), Miss Gavey (Cambridge), Miss Taylor. The ballot proved equal for Miss Gavey and Mr. Meredith, and. the chairman gave his casting vote in favour of the lady.

Volunteers of the Auckland district will be greatly pleased to hear of the liberality shown by several of our local prominent citizens, who have handsomely donated towards the purchasing of a shield, to be called the "Efficiency Shield," which is to be competed for by them at the Easter manoeuvres, rules "for which will shortly be issued. The Officer Commanding the District (Colonel Wolfe) has received most encouraging and pleasing letters from the following citizens, with donations, viz.:—Sir John Logan Campbell, £5; Messrs. Wilson and Horton, £3 3s; Sargood, Son, and Ewen (Ltd.), £2 2s; Leyland and O'Brien Timber Co., £2 2s; South British Insurance Co., £2 2s; Messrs. J. J. Craig, £1 Is; Arch. Clark and Sons, £1 Is; Kauri Timber Co., £1 Is; Hancock and Co., £1 Is; Brett Printing Co., £3 3s —total, £21 16s.

There was a little impromptu symposium in the Court of Appeal in Wellington on the question of punishment as inflicted by judicial sentence. Mr. Skerrett, K.C., was appealing for leniency on behalf of a solicitor who had erred, and spoke in effect of that quality which is not strained. Mr. Justice Edwards remarked that they had come to disregard that sort of feeling that a man who committed a crime ought to be punished, whether it was good for the State or not. Mr. Justice Denniston added that they had abandoned vindictive punishment and inflicted now only retributory and reformatory sentences. A similar line was taken by Mr. Justice Chapman, who said that the power of the court to punish appeared to be rapidly coming to be oneidered nonexistent. Mr. Justice Denniston: "Punishment rests with the jury.'' Mr. Justice Edwards: "Sentences are not inflicted for the purpose of pnuishment, but for the protection of the public. I hRVe often said so in Auckland." Mr. Skerrett: "Sentences necessarily involve punishment " Mr. Justice Chapman: "Sufferings." Mr. Skerrett added that a first offender should have a chance of redeeming his name and of eecaping punishment. The Court then proceeded to judgment.

There was a fair attendance at St. Andrew's Parish Hall last night, on the occasion of a lecture and demonstration by Professor Beaumont on the Gouin series method of teaching modern languages. The chief principle embodied in the system is the association of words with mental image. That is to say, the menial pictures that certain words in English represent are associated with foreign sounds, instead of an English printed word with a foreign printed word. A language is taught orally to commence with, reading and writing being taken up after the meaning and pronunciation are thoroughly known. This method has been applied in the French Government schools for over ten years, and has superseded all others. "The lecturer, after dealing with the different stages of instruction, gave a practical demonstration of a first lesson, assisted by members of the audience. He also announced that classes for the study of French language would be opened to-mprrow evening as i^dvertlsed..

'The City Council's enterprise in the direction of electric light and power supply is extending apparently beyond the four corners oi the city itself. Last night the Arch Hill Road Board received a communication from the metropolitan body asking permission to supply electricity to that district, and setting out the precautions for public safety under which they were prepared to convey that supply through the suburban body's territory. The Arch Hill Board very promptly decided to grant the request.

In connection with the drowning of Mr. R P. Clarkson, director of the Napier Technical School, on Saturday, it appears that the deceased and a young man named Espagne, a clerk in the employ of Dalgety and Company, were the only persons in the water at the time. On seeing that his companion was in difficulties, Espagne endeavoured to get him to roll over on his back so that he could support, him, but deceased, who was the bigger and stronger of the two, first clutched Espagne, and then gripped him round the side. Espagne realised the danger of the position, and finding himself powerlesß, set up a frenzied cry for help. People on the beach, however, failed to realise that a tragedy was being enacted, it unfortunately having been a practice amongst some bathers to sham drowning in the waves, and to set up mock screams for help. Thf: caretaker and others thought that Clarkson and Espagne were simply amusing themselves. Finally Clarkson slipped from his hold around Espagne's body, and grasped his would-be rescuer by the leg. A moment afterwards, however, the unfortunate victim's hold relaxed,' and Espagne reached the shore in an exhausted condition.

A decision of considerable importance to shopkeepers was delivered in the Magistrate's Court at Nelson yesterday. J. fi, Bethwaite, ironmonger, was charged with having kept his shop open op a Saturday afternoon in contravention to a. requisition from the only two other recognised ironmongers in the town, constituting a majority of the trade. Counsel for the defendant contended that several other shops, which sold ironmongery, among them being general stores, had not signed the requisition, and therefore the document was invalid, as it was not signed by t\ie majority. The magistrate held that any firm deal ing substantially in ironmongery, besides other goods, had a right to be regarded as ironmongers. Hence the requisition was not signed by the majority of the trade, and he dismissed the case. The question involved is whether shops, such as ironmongers, stationers, and booksellers, etc., specifically known as such, can claim to constitute, the majority on a requisition to choose the weekly halfholiday, and thus govern tKe smaller stores dealing iL such goods in addition to other lines.

The idea of brightening the hours of those who spend their days in the Costley Home has often been favoured at the table of the Hospital Board, and now it seems that the inmates are to have a new piano. Mr. H. Schofield, a member of the last Board, forwarded to the Board meeting yesterday afternoon £21, which had been collected to help in the purchase ol a piano for the infirmary ward of the institution. The Government subsidy is 24/ in the pound, and Mr. Schofield states that the Board will be able to purchase a suitable piano with the amount collected and the subsidy of the State. The donation was received with thanks, and the donors, and Mr. Schofield particularly, thanked.

A return presented to the Christchurch Tramway Board showed the surplus on the year's operations, after providing for sinking fund, depreciation, and renewal, was £6,744. The Board decided to electrify the lines at present operated by steam, and to submit to ratepayers proposals for the extension of existing lines involving an expenditure of £05.000.

A raid was made by Constable Butler on Sunday last on a Karangahake "two-up" school, which had long baffled the police, owing to the scientific scouting of the players. By - a clever ruse, the constable arrived on the scene, as he was supposed to be at church. He took the names of 33 men and boys, who will he summoned to appear at Court this week.

. Messrs. T. Mandeno Jackson will sell a compact residence of 7 rooms and conveniences, having 33ft frontage to O'Neilstreet, Ponsonby, by a depth of 99ft, with view of the upper reaches of the Harbour, at their rooms, Customs-street, at 2 o'clock to-morrow.

At a railway crossing between Waiknmete and Henderson yesterday a baker's cart was being driven across the line by a man named Albert Mason, when a train suddenly appeared round a bend, and crashed into the horse-drawn vehidle. The vehicle was wrecked completely, the horse had a foot cut off, and Mason was thrown high into the air. He landed clear of the rails, and the extent of his injuries appear to be a few cuts and bruises.

A Wellington reporter has a gloomy account to give of the unskilled labouf conditions in that city. Eariy on Thursday morning he, in company with Mr. McLaren, M.P., paid a visit to the wharf, and he reports that there he found no fewer than 400 men—young, middle-aged, tough, strong men of all nationalities— all waiting in the "donkey-room" for a job to turn up. Some of these sons of toil are careless and indifferent, banging checkers and dominoes and laughing whole-heartedly; others are down-heart-ed, sitting with hopelesis-looking shoulders against the wall, nursing their tiouble; and here are the clear-eyed, alert, big-thewed men who, confident in their muscles, have no fear of to-mor-row. During the whole long day there would only tie a call for about forty of the toilers; the rest must subsist on hope ~..,, and there are the missuses and the children — and the winter. In fact, the outlook is not at all happy; as compared with last year the amount of targo arriving has decreased 33 per cent., while the number of hands has increased to a like amount. Mr. McLaren states that he has 18u0 names of applicants in his pocket ledgen This state of things, it is said, is owing to a large degree to the completion of the. Main Trunk railway; tradesmen also, squeezed out of their pwn corner by various exigencies, go to swell the general ranks.

A deputation waited upon Mr. Geo. Tutt, of Upper Symonde-street, yesterday, and presented a petition with over 500 signatures requesting Mr. Tutt to stand for a seat on the City Council and pledging themselves to endeavour to' secure his return. Mr. Tutt, who has been for rnajiy years in business in t-he district represented by the petition, decided to accede to the wishes of the deputation, and will be a candidate.

Easter. Both shops open to-morrow (Wednesday) till 6 p.m. Upper shop open Thursday till 9 p.m., and Saturday till 6 p.m. Lower shop open Saturday till 9 p.m. John Court, Ltd., Drapers, Clothiers, and Milliners, Queen-street. "—* (Ad,

A number of the residents of Manunui and Taumarunui are convening a meeting for the purpose of making arrangements to explore Mount Ngauriihoe during the Easter holidays. • The intention is to land by train as near the mountain as possible, and make the ascent in the shortest possible space of time, make a complete survey, and gather any information of a scientific, botanical, or geological nature, and view the numerous changes which have taken place since the recent activity. The eruption has completely subsided, and the absence of snow on the peak, which will not now be for long, renders the venture perfectly safe. Several members of the expedition are familiar with the district, and will be of great assistance. Each intending member will require to provide himself with a warm rug and sufficient food for at least two days. The promoters extend a hearty invitation to anyone who may desire to join them, and any further information of the arrangements will be gladly given by Mr. J. Copeland, of Taumarunui.

In all probability the buzz of the electric cars will not be heard in the City and suburbs on Friday next. The day i 6 Good Friday, and it is the custom of the Company's employees to hold their picnic on that day. Therefore the Company is soliciting the permission of the various local bodies to suspend the traffic on Friday, so that the whole staff will be free to go.

The new Inspector of Prisons, Dt. Hay, graduated in medicine at the University of Aberdeen in 1890. In 1904 he was appointed Assistant-Inspector-Gen-eral of Hospitals and Mental Hospitals, his chief being the late Dr. MacGregor. Before his actual graduation in 1890, Dr. Hay was selected as assistant to the Superintendent of the Perth Royal Asylum, Dr. Urqubart, one of the foremost of British authorities on mental science, asylum architecture, and asylum administration. In the occasional absence of Dr. Urquhart, Dr. Hay had to discharge the duties of acting-superinten-dent. In 1897 Dr. Hay was selected by Dr. Clouston, Superintendent of the Edinburgh Royal Asylum, to occupy the position of medical superintendent of Ashburn Hall, the famous private asylum founded at Dunedin by Dr. Alexander and the late James Hume, which position he resigned in 1904 to become Assistant-Inspector-General ot Asylums and Mental Asylums. He became Inspector-General in January, 1908.

There are in Auckland Hospital at present a family of newly-arrived immigrants laid low by scarlet fever. A letter from Dr. Purdy was read before 1 the Hospital Board this afternoon stating that Dr. Mason, Chief Health Officer, had asked him to inform, the Board that the Marine Superintendent of the Shaw, Savi.il and Albion Company, Ltd., had stated that his Company would defray 1 all expenses for the maintenance of the scarlet fever patients ex Corinthic, landed by the Monowai.

Speaking to a reporter in Christchurch, Sir William Russell said that the fruit industry wa6 making splendid progress in Hawke's Bay. A greater I knowledge was being obtained year by year of varieties of fruits, required for the canning industry, and large numbers of private persons, as well as the Frimley firm, were entering into the industry. Large quantities of pears and tomatoes were now cmltivated for the factory at Frimley. During the past year the output of green peas had increased about six-fold. The disease of the peach tree, by scientific treatment, had been almost extirpated, and large areas had been planted in peaches lately. The pear tree, if properly sprayed, gave excellent results in their districts. Quinces grew in places all over the plains and were very prolific. It was probable that every year saw a hundred acres of fresh land put under fruit. As the industry was becoming better understood, it was being systematized, and better result? were being obtained, and the prospects were very bright and hopeful.

Convalescence is generally slow after an exhausting illness. Steams' Wine of Cod Liver Extract helps the patient to recover quickly by aiding nature to build up the tissues and invigorate the whole system, jj

Men's and Boys' Clothing.—Grey and Ford (Ltd.) hold a large stock of all requirements in men's and hoys' clothing, and the prices are just what you want to pay. We ask your patronage. — The "Old Beehive," Newton.—(Ad.)

Don't you think our tie displays are great? Miles and miles of designs and colours. We have them from 6d. to 2/6 each. Geo. Fowlds.—.(Ad.)

Easter.—Our premises will be open all day to-morrow and till 9 p.m. on Saturday; closed Friday and Monday.—Rushbrook and Bridgman, Queen-street. — (Ad.)

Camping out, cheap rugs, 2s 6d 2s lid, 3s lid, 4s lid, 5s 6d, Ts 6d each; very special value, at Rushbrook and Bridgman's, opposite the Town Hal site.— (Ad.)

Rugs! Rugsl! Rugs!!! Camp rugs, 2s lid, 4s lid, 5s 11<L 7s lid, 9s lid, 12s 6d, 14s 6d each, very special value. Kapok pillows, Is 3d, Is Bd, Is lid, 2s 6d each.—Grey and Ford's (Ltd.), the "Old Beehive," Newton. Next Buchanan's.— (Ad.)

What about your boy's suit? Why not let us clothe him? Thousands of satisfied parents) Tunic suits from 6/li. Geo. Fowlds.—(Ad.)

Dross Goodsl Dress Goods! The newest materials for costumes and drosses now opened up and showing at Grey and Ford's (Ltd,), the "Old Beahive,'' Newton, We ask your Inspection, -(Ad.)

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Auckland Star Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 82, 6 April 1909

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