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THE DEFENCE PROPOSALS.

PBIME MINISTER'S REPLY TO iIK. ALLEN.

! p y lelegraph.-Press Association.)

.' ■ WELLINGTON, Monday. ' t„ the course of an interview with a Jl Zealand Times" representative, the said he . had ™ d T e tto a general criticism ot Mr. James ffl_Ainterview regarding his speech at «Smt Hutt, excepting on one point, .fee to ™ shed t0 ha " a WlOng """ *f-ion removed. Mr. Allen was reC*_ to have said: "I do not agree ™I>Tthe Prime Minister when he says Srt regard to the Commonwealth that tat they, are doing is next door to Vliish" Sir Joseph said he did not how any such deduc- £ c«-d have been made by Mr. Allen %Voni the Press report; of my speech, t oEtinued Sir Joseph "the statement *Xi which Mr. Allen has evidently based is as follows: 'The Prime pointed out that any of the 'lit battleships could lie seven miles Xayfrom our principal ports and shell rte city and to urge that we should co-operate with the Australian Continent in having an inadet l uate s - r5t u em , or and destroyers, wtth the knowled? 6 oi what was going on in the cdentific development ot battleships, was lltdoor to childish." Sir Joseph said L was dealing with a statement pubBdv made the night before in Wellington that New Zealand should join with Australia in their defence proposals. He tjuted out that what Australia proved might be quite satistactory for Sat country, which was comparatively . lar-re continent with a population four l imes°as great as ours; but that in his wiiiioii it would not suit the circum-, stances or conditions of New Zealand. Sir Joseph Ward added that he recognised that it was Australia's duty to do whatever it considered best 111 its own interests, hut he was quite confident =0 far as New Zealand itself was concerned that ii we went in for proT idino destroyers and submarines only -''without auxiliary battleships, if the time, should ever arrive when it became necessary for New Zealand to defend herself an ordinary squadron of battle-: ships, or even against a single modern battleship, any man who attempted to put into practice for New Zealand's ex- j ternal defence such a proposal should! deservedly have the title of childish applied to him. Our real strength on the M a was the British navy.

J\" tINPATBIOTIC TRADESMEN.

(By Telegraph.—Press Association.)

CHKrSTCHURCH, this day. •"T/e Canterbury Trades and Labour Council resolved: "That this Council expresses its unqualified condemnation of the -unconstitutional action of Sir Joseph IWard and Cabinet in daring to dispose of public money by the presentation of battleships to Great Britain without the authority of Parliament or the people; that we -further endorse the action of Mr. T. E. Taylor, ILP., in placing the true facts of the position before the ißritish Prime Mmister.'' DtJNEDIN, this day. The- Paintes l —lndustrial Union of "R'orkers passed the following resolution at a meeting to-night: "That this union emphatically protests against the unwarranted action rif'Sir 7. G. Ward and his Cabinet in offering a Dreadnought, as the country is retarded for want of funds to carry out the work of the Dominion, as proved 'by the dearth of employment here." DMEDIN" OFFICERS INTERVIEWED i .(By Telegraph.—Press Association.) DUXEDIN, this day. Interviewed by a "Star" reporter regarding Sir Joseph Ward's speech, Lieut.colonel Myers, a Volunteer officer oi lengthy experience, said the Government iad not given sufficient encouragement to shooting, which was the first consideration in any effective scheme of defence. The greatest encouragement that could he given was to have teams from a distance shooting against one another.' Better provision should be found for youths after they leave school adult corps. If the Prime Minister would look after the lads in the intervening ages, he would find such abundance of material as would do away with all necessity for compulsory service. He ako thought every qualified Volunteer should have the right to travel free for a fortnight over all the railways of the dominion, and that the ranks "would be Jhled within a month. The_flon. J. B. Callan, who served 11 years in the Volunteer force said every youth between the ages of 18 and 25 Mould fc obliged to serve three or four fears in a Volunteer company. Were ™:a a proposal carried, our youth would fr r !^ owled S c of skirmishing «* attack formation, and a hundred i„ 7% !* tth woul <i "c of infinite use m,A £erTice ' He said if sir Joseph <> «d was going to establish a system » trainin S without- making it jf J; 01 ?' he was curious to see how !* proposed to set about it.

REFERENCES.

"ASSIST IN EVERY WAY

lectof v PP^ mtive remarks °n the -üb--SSS- Zealand ' s Dreadnought offer SL^" 64 b ' V ' at the kst « "■ the Darnell Borough Council evening, when it was reported that HfcOfcG.W.B Ml £, hadfor . Uubrt «"jP»tulator>- message on ""tPOint to the Prime Minister, from' i? Uo ?™g reply had been received or-Joseph Ward:—"l sincerely lation » V 0 your message of congratu3S.*_?* of Parne!l - appreciative offering a< ?° n of the Government in p?S E /,, te t«eship, and I heartily ap- »* £iw tttiments cx P ress;d in a -\° r < ilr ' R - S- Briggs) iorsei n Major's action be enBritjsher and J the , s P eaker > was a any «„ he ' vould never like see 'Ourfr;! f 0 r rride the Britisli nation. BriaSi ' he added ' '•fought for fouid tw emac y at sea - and what "*ateh , - * hnk i! they were able to ** to l-!° W -! nd if we did -°t do our Wlr? 1 ' to g«her. As a nation rf2*3? w ulder t0 sho,lld€r to *ay wp n h Government in every m&oZff™ ll t0 the "tent of four IfcW ° f one '" *fe exDr P5 ,' b sec °nding the **™ approval, and the y ""gat think it a * **as mm SUch a YOun g country, but fc «c of =J°° 11 to P a j " the de*we ffiTi** and liberty. If to «onal ,-, ° c an y great contest for Is tie \t„";.'P ™ aCy h would l»e fought Hip • "ea. , W , a f unanimously. Utfr Sir jnTt. ™ d to congratuISttS ---fT* 0 Ward on the Dread)fett was the Newmarket

Borough Council, and they have since received from the Premier a reply stating that, he had read the terms of the resolu tion with gratification, and desired to express his thanks to the Council for its expression of approval of the Governments action.

UNIVERSAL MILITARY TRAINING.

COLONEL ALLEN BELL'S SCHEME.

Colonel Bell has supplied the "Waikato Times" with details of his scheme for a system of universal military training from 18 to 21 years with the creation of a Reserve Force composed of men from 21 to 45 years of age. Colonel Bell has received figures from the RegistrarGeneral giving the estimated number of males of 18 and under 19 years of age in the Dominion on December 31st, 1908. This estimated number is arrived' at by the Registrar-General by raising the figures of the census of 1906 by the percentage increase of the population and the result arrived at is 9951. Numerically the scheme would work out as follows:—

Number of males of 18 and under 19 years of age as at December 31st 1908. 0951; number physically unfit, say, 15 per cent. 1493; number'fit for training, 5458; or in round numbers, 8500 men. Taking the three years' course in the regulations: In the first year there would be under training, 8500 men; in the second year there would be under training, 17,000 men; in the third year there would be under training, 25.500 men.

Note.—Enrolled strength Defence Forces 2Sth February, 1908, including Defence Cadets (3158) and Reserves (215). equal 19.947. estimated cost for year ended 2Sth February. 1909, £214,----470.

In the fourth year 8500 (plus the percentage increase in population) new recruits would enter the ranks and the same number of trained men go into the first Reserve where they would remain with a diminished course of training for a further three years. After completing the course of training in the first Reserve they would be drafted to the second Reserve where they would remain for seven years and then go into the third reserve for a period of fifteen years. Colonel Bell's scheme for the training of this force which he assures us would be effective and provide one of the finest armies in the world is as follows: —

Regulars. ISth, iflth and 20th years: One month in military instructional camp; quarterly instructional field days; forty-five parades each year, which may be held in the evening or another time which will not interfere with the youth attending to his means of livelihood. Note.—The above forty-five parades, include the course of rifle practice. I First Reserve: 21st, 22nd and 2Srd years, two instructional field days per year, six parades each year (evening or otherwise) quarterly course of rifle practice.

Second Reserve: 23rd to 30th years, one instructional field day per year, sixmonthly course of rifle practice.

Third Reserve: 30th to 45th year, annual course rifle practice.

It must be noted that the scheme provides for the recruit starting at the age of 18 years (when he would leave his cadet corps) and it is not tbe intention to start and train men who have advanced beyond this age without training and w"ho would find it more difficult to learn. Under this scheme in a few years we should have our whole male population who were physically fit, efficiently trained and without any undue hardship being placed on the individual. The numerical strength would automatically increase by the growth of population which would also provide the financial increase necessary.

Some of the results and advantages of the universal system: Security of the Empire from invasion. Strengthening the navy by giving its freedom of movement. Revolutionise the national character of our people. Every man trained to high ideals of duty, obedience to authority and discipline which would be of incalculable benefit in the industrial! world. Improvement of the physique of the nation. No youths slouching along with their heads down about their j boots. Straight-backed, broad-shoulder-' ed fellows, men of ideals, imbued with a spirit of self-reliance and self-sacrifice | for the good of the country and its people The raising of the lower classes in the slums of the cities, by breaking down the dividing line that exists be-1 tween ricli and poor and bringing the masses into contact with men of high ideals, integrity, and sense of nationa and public duty. Raising the physical and moral degenerates congregated in the slums of cities and training them to I be of service to themselves and their country. Imbuing them with the idea that every man in whatever station in life, who "will attempt to ra.se himself may fill an honourable position in that country and a place of honour in the Pa-n-Bri tannic militia-"the Army of the Empire."

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THE DEFENCE PROPOSALS. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 82, 6 April 1909

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