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A MAORI ADVENTURER.

DRIVING IN. CABS AND iDETNKING

CHAMPAGNE.

&J. Telegraph.—Press Association^

DIENEDIN, this day. In the Police Court to-day Tamati Wiremu Wirehana , W as charged wit! obtaining £15 from -Geo. Tairua by false pretence, and also £5 from Ernest Hutton by similar means. It was stated by the police that accused had represented himself to be a relation of Mrs. G P. Donnelly, of Hawke's Bay. Several other citizens who would' not face publicity had been taken down. Accused, who spent the money obtained in driving in cabs and drinking champagne, was a perfect adventurer, who in fiH>2 was imprisoned for forgery. Accused, who pleaded guilty, was sentenced to sis months' imprisonment. An elegant liner was leaving London for New Zealand recently (says the "Napier Telegraph-) when a young Maori presented himself at the office of a wellknown shipping company, and said that he was in an awkward position. He was. to leave by the boat, and every minute expected a cable from Mr G. P. Donnelly, of Hawke's Bay, New Zealand, guaranteeing his passage money. The young man gave his name as Tareha, and said that Mr Donnelly was married to his sister. The boat was leaving, and tEe cable had not flashed across the ocean. He was forced to lay Ms position before the company. The young man had a polished style thai was not to be denied, and the shipping officials yielded to the graces of what was stated to be a Je Aute College education. They hastily gave the young man a ticket for a firstclass berth, and placed their faith in the lineage of a Tareha. The name of Mr G. P. Donnelly also sounded good, and the young man said that the cable would arrive after he had sailed. The voyage out was a delightful one, and the Tareha lived on the best. The stewards were particularly attentive, and the prepossessing appearance of the native won the regard of his fellow passengers. Arriving at Dunedin, the native set up a pretentious masquerade, and, Mr G. P. Donnelly became aware that his name was being taken in vain. A well-known public man in the south, anxious to assist a supposed relative of Mr Donnelly's, lent the young man a substantial sum to take him to Hawke's Bay. The game of native bluff was carried on until it played itself out, and the young man was arrested in Wellington. Even in gaol he appears to have made a final effort. Mr Donnelly received a telegram from the Hon. . Carroll stating "Tareha has been arrested for a debt of of £30." Mr Donnelly replied that there are only two Tarehas whoare relatives of his, and they are both in Hawke's Bay* The Wellington usurper of the title may therefore be considered a fraud.

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A MAORI ADVENTURER. Auckland Star, Volume XL, Issue 80, 3 April 1909

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